hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Abraham Lincoln 1,765 1 Browse Search
A. Lincoln 650 0 Browse Search
Thomas Lincoln 535 1 Browse Search
Springfield (Illinois, United States) 395 13 Browse Search
Stephen A. Douglas 280 0 Browse Search
Illinois (Illinois, United States) 258 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 212 0 Browse Search
James Shields 172 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 126 0 Browse Search
David Davis 109 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

Found 402 total hits in 103 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
rbed by the fear that he had been too bitter and unrelenting in his prosecution of him. I acted, he said, on the theory that he was possuming insanity, and now I fear I have been too severe and that the poor fellow may be insane after all. If he cannot realize the wrong of his crime, then I was wrong in aiding to punish him.--Hon. Joseph E. McDonald. August, 1888. Statement to J. W. W. He would abandon his case first. He did so in the case of Buckmaster for the use of Dedham vs. Beemes and Arthur, in our Supreme Court, in which I happened to be opposed to him. Another gentlemen, less fastidious, took Mr. Lincoln's place and gained the case. A widow who owned a piece of valuable land employed Lincoln and myself to examine the title to the property, with the view of ascertaining whether certain alleged tax liens were just or not. In tracing back the title we were not satisfied with the description of the ground in one of the deeds of conveyance. Lincoln, to settle the matter, took
his effectiveness in managing a law suit entirely on the stimulus and inspiration of the final hour. He paid but little attention to the fees and money matters of the firm — usually leaving all such to me. He never entered an item in the account book. If any one paid money to him which belonged to the firm, on arriving at the office he divided it with me. If I was not there, he would wrap up my share in a piece of paper and place it in my drawer — marking it with a pencil, Case of Roe vs. Doe.--Herndon's half. On many topics he was not a good conversationalist, because he felt that he was not learned enough. Neither was he a good listener. Putting it a little strongly, he was often not even polite. If present with others, or participating in a conversation, he was rather abrupt, and in his anxiety to say something apt or to illustrate the subject under discussion, would burst in with a story. In our office I have known him to consume the whole forenoon relating stories. If
f great corporations, we both thanked the Lord for letting the Illinois Central Railroad fall into our hands. In the summer of 1857 Lincoln was employed by one Manny, of Chicago, to defend him in an action brought by McCormick, The case, McCormick vs. Manny, is reported in 6 McLean's Rep., p. 539. who was the inventor of theManny, is reported in 6 McLean's Rep., p. 539. who was the inventor of the reaping machine, for infringement of patent. Lincoln had been recommended to Manny by E. B. Washburne, then a member of Congress from northern Illinois. The case was to be tried before Judge McLean at Cincinnati, in the Circuit Court of the United States. The counsel for McCormick was Reverdy Johnson. Edwin M. Stanton and GeorManny by E. B. Washburne, then a member of Congress from northern Illinois. The case was to be tried before Judge McLean at Cincinnati, in the Circuit Court of the United States. The counsel for McCormick was Reverdy Johnson. Edwin M. Stanton and George Harding, of Philadelphia, were associated on the other side with Lincoln. The latter came to Cincinnati a few days before the argument took place, and stopped at the house of a friend. The case was one of great importance pecuniarily, relates a lawyer W. M. Dickson. in Cincinnati, who was a member of the bar at the time, an
David Davis (search for this): chapter 12
great and a very insignificant lawyer. Judge David Davis, in his eulogy on Lincoln at Indianapoli spoken under other circumstances. In 1866 Judge Davis said in a statement made to me in his home uit with him, but of course not so much as Judge Davis, who held the court, and whom Lincoln follove or ten minutes justified the declaration of Davis, that he was hurtful in denunciation and merciood investments and lucky terms, some of them, Davis, for example, were rapidly becoming wealthy; beeted us at many of the dingy taverns, says David Davis, Lincoln said nothing. He was once presiding as judge in the absence of Davis, and the case before him was an action brought by a merchant aged Lincoln once while he was holding court for Davis by attempting to defend against a note to whicr the first time in June of the same year. David Davis and Leonard Swett had just preceded him. Thd while there, usually roomed with Lincoln and Davis. We stopped at McCormick's hotel, an old-fash[4 more...]
Reverdy Johnson (search for this): chapter 12
e tried before Judge McLean at Cincinnati, in the Circuit Court of the United States. The counsel for McCormick was Reverdy Johnson. Edwin M. Stanton and George Harding, of Philadelphia, were associated on the other side with Lincoln. The latter lawyer W. M. Dickson. in Cincinnati, who was a member of the bar at the time, and in the law questions involved. Reverdy Johnson represented the plaintiff. Mr. Lincoln had prepared himself with the greatest care; his ambition was up to speak ineason assigned being that the importance of the case required a man of the experience and power of Mr. Stanton to meet Mr. Johnson. The Cincinnati lawyer was appointed for his local influence. These reasons did not remove the slight conveyed in thwn who he was had his name been given to them. He came with the fond hope of making fame in a forensic contest with Reverdy Johnson. He was pushed aside, humiliated and mortified. He attached to the innocent city the displeasure that filled his b
Abe Lincoln (search for this): chapter 12
he nap usually worn or rubbed off. He wore a short cloak and sometimes a shawl. His coat and vest hung loosely on his gaunt frame, and his trousers were invariably too short. On the circuit he carried in one hand a faded green umbrella, with A. Lincoln in large white cotton or muslin letters sewed on the inside. The knob was gone from the handle, and when closed a piece of cord was usually tied around it in the middle to keep it from flying open. In the other hand he carried a literal carpenow, at 8 o'clock, P. M., of the last day of the term, ask to plead to the merits, which is denied by the court on the ground that the offer comes too late, and therefore, as by nil dicet, judgment is rendered for Pl'ff. Clerk assess damages. A. Lincoln, Judge protem. H. C. Whitney, Ms., letter, Nov. 13, 1865. The lawyer who reads this singular entry will appreciate its oddity if no one else does. After making it one of the lawyers, on recovering his astonishment, ventured to enquire, Wel
William Armstrong (search for this): chapter 12
aracteristics as a lawyer. one of Lincoln's briefs. the Wright case. defending the ladies. reminiscences of the circuit. the suit against the Illinois Central railroad. the Manny case. First meeting with Edwin M. Stanton. defense of William Armstrong. last law-suit in Illinois. the dinner at Arnold's in Chicago. A law office is a dull, dry place so far as pleasurable or interesting incidents are concerned. If one is in search of stories of fraud, deceit, cruelty, broken promises, donned a new shirt, and by mistake had drawn it over his head with the pleated bosom behind. The general laugh which followed destroyed the effect of Logan's eloquence over the jury — the very point at which Lincoln aimed. The trial of William Armstrong This incident in Lincoln's career has been most happily utilized by Dr. Edward Eggleston in his story The Graysons, recently published in the Century Magazine. for the murder of James P. Metzler, in May, 1858, at Beardstown, Illinois, i
summer of 1857 Lincoln was employed by one Manny, of Chicago, to defend him in an action brought by McCormick, The case, McCormick vs. Manny, is reported in 6 McLean's Rep., p. 539. who was the inventor of the reaping machine, for infringement of patent. Lincoln had been recommended to Manny by E. B. Washburne, then a member of Congress from northern Illinois. The case was to be tried before Judge McLean at Cincinnati, in the Circuit Court of the United States. The counsel for McCormick was Reverdy Johnson. Edwin M. Stanton and George Harding, of Philadelphia, were associated on the other side with Lincoln. The latter came to Cincinnati a few daysinquire of another, Where did that long-armed creature come from, and what can he expect to do in this case? During the trial Lincoln formed a poor opinion of Judge McLean. He characterized him as an old granny, with considerable vigor of mind, but no perception at all. If you were to point your finger at him, he put it, and a d
Joseph Gillespie (search for this): chapter 12
s is probably a law for the violation of which the jury can fix no punishment. Lincoln gave some of his own observations on the ruinous effects of whiskey in society, and demanded its early suppression. After he had concluded, the Court, without awaiting the return of the jury, dismissed the ladies, saying: Ladies, go home. I will require no bond of you, and if any fine is ever wanted of you, we will let you know. After Lincoln's death a fellow-lawyer paid this tribute to him: Joseph Gillespie, Ms., Letter, Oct. 8, 1886. He was wonderfully kind, careful, and just. He had an immense stock of commonsense, and he had faith enough in it to trust it in every emergency. Mr. Lincoln's love of justice and fair-play was his predominating trait. I have often listened to him when I thought he would certainly state his case out of court. It was not in his nature to assume or attempt to bolster up a false position. Early in 1858 at Danville, Ill., I met Lincoln, Swett, and others w
Andrew McCormick (search for this): chapter 12
the Illinois Central Railroad fall into our hands. In the summer of 1857 Lincoln was employed by one Manny, of Chicago, to defend him in an action brought by McCormick, The case, McCormick vs. Manny, is reported in 6 McLean's Rep., p. 539. who was the inventor of the reaping machine, for infringement of patent. Lincoln had McCormick vs. Manny, is reported in 6 McLean's Rep., p. 539. who was the inventor of the reaping machine, for infringement of patent. Lincoln had been recommended to Manny by E. B. Washburne, then a member of Congress from northern Illinois. The case was to be tried before Judge McLean at Cincinnati, in the Circuit Court of the United States. The counsel for McCormick was Reverdy Johnson. Edwin M. Stanton and George Harding, of Philadelphia, were associated on the other sMcCormick was Reverdy Johnson. Edwin M. Stanton and George Harding, of Philadelphia, were associated on the other side with Lincoln. The latter came to Cincinnati a few days before the argument took place, and stopped at the house of a friend. The case was one of great importance pecuniarily, relates a lawyer W. M. Dickson. in Cincinnati, who was a member of the bar at the time, and in the law questions involved. Reverdy Johnson represent
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11