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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Clinton, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
e unique: No contract.--Not professional services.--Unreasonable charge.--Money retained by Deft not given by Pl'ff.--Revolutionary War.--Describe Valley Forge privations.--Ice-Soldier's bleeding feet.--Pl'ffs husband.--Soldier leaving home for army.--Skin Deft.--Close. It must not be inferred from this that Lincoln was in the habit of slopping over. He never hunted up acts of injustice, but if they came to him he was easily enlisted. In 1855 he was attending court at the town of Clinton, Illinois. Fifteen ladies from a neighboring village in the county had been indicated for trespass. Their offence consisted in sweeping down on one Tanner, the keeper of a saloon in the village, and knocking in the heads of his barrels. Lincoln was not employed in the case, but sat watching the trial as it proceeded. In defending the ladies their attorney seemed to evince a little want of tact, and this prompted one of the former to invite Mr. Lincoln to add a few words to the jury, if he tho
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
h Lincoln. The latter came to Cincinnati a few days before the argument took place, and stopped at the house of a friend. The case was one of great importance pecuniarily, relates a lawyer W. M. Dickson. in Cincinnati, who was a member of the bar at the time, and in the law questions involved. Reverdy Johnson represented the plaintiff. Mr. Lincoln had prepared himself with the greatest care; his ambition was up to speak in the case and to measure swords with the renowned lawyer from Baltimore. It was understood between his client and himself before his coming that Mr. Harding, of Philadelphia, was to be associated with him in the case, and was to make the mechanical argument. After reaching Cincinnati, Mr. Lincoln was a little surprised and annoyed to learn that his client had also associated with him Mr. Edwin M. Stanton, of Pittsburg, and a lawyer of our own bar, the reason assigned being that the importance of the case required a man of the experience and power of Mr. Sta
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ress from northern Illinois. The case was to be tried before Judge McLean at Cincinnati, in the Circuit Court of the United States. The counsel for McCormick was Readelphia, were associated on the other side with Lincoln. The latter came to Cincinnati a few days before the argument took place, and stopped at the house of a frieas one of great importance pecuniarily, relates a lawyer W. M. Dickson. in Cincinnati, who was a member of the bar at the time, and in the law questions involved. th him in the case, and was to make the mechanical argument. After reaching Cincinnati, Mr. Lincoln was a little surprised and annoyed to learn that his client had your request for me to come again, I must say to you I never expect to be in Cincinnati again. I have nothing against the city, but things have so happened here as resembled a map of the continent. Mr. Lincoln, adds Mr. Dickson, remained in Cincinnati about a week, moving freely around, yet not twenty men knew him personally or
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
eeting with Edwin M. Stanton. defense of William Armstrong. last law-suit in Illinois. the dinner at Arnold's in Chicago. A law office is a dull, dry place so f at the bar. He was greatest in my opinion as a lawyer in the Supreme Court of Illinois. There the cases were never hurried. The attorneys generally prepared their d Virginia. But now she is poor and defenceless. Out here on the prairies of Illinois, many hundreds of miles away from the scenes of her childhood, she appeals to n recommended to Manny by E. B. Washburne, then a member of Congress from northern Illinois. The case was to be tried before Judge McLean at Cincinnati, in the Circrusque and abrupt way, it is said, described him as a long, lank creature from Illinois, wearing a dirty linen duster for a coat, on the back of which the perspiratiotable will and self-confidence, he gained such ascendency among the lawyers of Illinois. The reader is enabled thereby to understand the philosophy of his growth.
Henry C. Whitney (search for this): chapter 12
last day of the term, ask to plead to the merits, which is denied by the court on the ground that the offer comes too late, and therefore, as by nil dicet, judgment is rendered for Pl'ff. Clerk assess damages. A. Lincoln, Judge protem. H. C. Whitney, Ms., letter, Nov. 13, 1865. The lawyer who reads this singular entry will appreciate its oddity if no one else does. After making it one of the lawyers, on recovering his astonishment, ventured to enquire, Well, Lincoln, how can we get thihe prosecutor never found out the dodge until the trials were over, and immense fun and rejoicing were indulged in at the result. The same gentleman who furnishes this last incident, and who was afterward a trusted friend of Mr. Lincoln, Henry C. Whitney, has described most happily the delights of a life on the circuit. A bit of it, referring to Lincoln, I apprehend, cannot be deemed out of place here. In October, 1854, Abraham Lincoln, he relates, drove into our town (Urbana) to attend co
nded for his effectiveness in managing a law suit entirely on the stimulus and inspiration of the final hour. He paid but little attention to the fees and money matters of the firm — usually leaving all such to me. He never entered an item in the account book. If any one paid money to him which belonged to the firm, on arriving at the office he divided it with me. If I was not there, he would wrap up my share in a piece of paper and place it in my drawer — marking it with a pencil, Case of Roe vs. Doe.--Herndon's half. On many topics he was not a good conversationalist, because he felt that he was not learned enough. Neither was he a good listener. Putting it a little strongly, he was often not even polite. If present with others, or participating in a conversation, he was rather abrupt, and in his anxiety to say something apt or to illustrate the subject under discussion, would burst in with a story. In our office I have known him to consume the whole forenoon relating stor
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 12
ud, much to my discomfort. Singularly enough Lincoln never read any other way but aloud. This hableast aid in carrying that. Any man who took Lincoln for a simple-minded man would very soon wake e, and knocking in the heads of his barrels. Lincoln was not employed in the case, but sat watchinon. Early in 1858 at Danville, Ill., I met Lincoln, Swett, and others who had returned from courw who owned a piece of valuable land employed Lincoln and myself to examine the title to the propers, everybody ate at a long table. The judge, Lincoln, and I had the ladies' parlor fitted up with themselves and play till late in the night. Lincoln, Davis, and a few local wits would spend the Lincoln and Swett were the great lawyers, and Lincoln always wanted Swett in jury cases. We who sthe reapers. So this motion excluded either Mr. Lincoln or Mr. Stanton, -which? By the custom of tends of both Lincoln and Douglas. Arnold's Lincoln, p. 90. I could fill this volume with rem[91 more...]
s barrels. Lincoln was not employed in the case, but sat watching the trial as it proceeded. In defending the ladies their attorney seemed to evince a little want of tact, and this prompted one of the former to invite Mr. Lincoln to add a few words to the jury, if he thought he could aid their cause. He was too gallant to refuse and, their attorney having consented, he made use of the following argument: In this case I would change the order of indictment and have it read The State vs. Mr. Whiskey, instead-of The State vs. The Ladies; and touching these there are three laws: The Law of self-protection; the law of the land, or statute law; and the moral law, or law of God. First, the law of self-protection is a law of necessity, as evinced by our forefathers in casting the tea overboard and asserting their right to the pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness. In this case it is the only defense the ladies have, for Tanner neither feared God nor regarded man. Second, the law of the
inside. The knob was gone from the handle, and when closed a piece of cord was usually tied around it in the middle to keep it from flying open. In the other hand he carried a literal carpet-bag, in which were stored the few papers to be used in court, and underclothing enough to last till his returns to Springfield. He slept in a long, coarse, yellow flannel shirt, which reached half-way between his knees and ankles. It probably was not made to fit his bony figure as completely as Beau Brummel's shirt, and hence we can somewhat appreciate the sensation of a young lawyer who, on seeing him thus arrayed for the first time, observed afterwards that, He was the ungodliest figure I ever saw. He never complained of the food, bed, or lodgings. If every other fellow grumbled at the bill-of-fare which greeted us at many of the dingy taverns, says David Davis, Lincoln said nothing. He was once presiding as judge in the absence of Davis, and the case before him was an action brought by
Buckmaster (search for this): chapter 12
ted about Wyant; that his sleep had been disturbed by the fear that he had been too bitter and unrelenting in his prosecution of him. I acted, he said, on the theory that he was possuming insanity, and now I fear I have been too severe and that the poor fellow may be insane after all. If he cannot realize the wrong of his crime, then I was wrong in aiding to punish him.--Hon. Joseph E. McDonald. August, 1888. Statement to J. W. W. He would abandon his case first. He did so in the case of Buckmaster for the use of Dedham vs. Beemes and Arthur, in our Supreme Court, in which I happened to be opposed to him. Another gentlemen, less fastidious, took Mr. Lincoln's place and gained the case. A widow who owned a piece of valuable land employed Lincoln and myself to examine the title to the property, with the view of ascertaining whether certain alleged tax liens were just or not. In tracing back the title we were not satisfied with the description of the ground in one of the deeds of con
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