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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Abe Lincoln (search for this): chapter 16
still living, who at the time of the debate between Lincoln and Douglas, was a book publisher in Springfield. Lincoln had collected newspaper slips of all the speeches made during the debate, and proposed to him their publication in book form; but the man declined, fearing there would be no demand for such a book. Subsequently, when the speeches were gotten out in book form in Ohio, Mr. Lincoln procured a copy and gave it to his Springfield friend, writing on the fly-leaf, Compliments of A. Lincoln. thus proving anew that a prophet is not without honor, save in his own country. In December he visited Kansas, speaking at Atchison, Troy, Leavenworth, and other towns near the border. His speeches there served to extend his reputation still further westward. Though his arguments were; repetitions of the doctrine laid down in the contest with Douglas, yet they were new to the majority of his Kansas How Mr. Lincoln stood on the questions of the hour, after his defeat by Douglas, is
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 16
15. Effect of the canvass of 1858 on Lincoln's pocket-book. attempts to lecture. on the As we were going to Danville court I read to Lincoln a lecture by Bancroft on the wonderful progreti in their intercourse. Nine months after Mr. Lincoln left us, after he had been nominated for ths incident is in the letter it brought from Mr. Lincoln, revealing his indignation at the seeming ie, had gone to Ohio, and thither in September Lincoln, in response to the demands of party friends ouglas, was a book publisher in Springfield. Lincoln had collected newspaper slips of all the speeeches were gotten out in book form in Ohio, Mr. Lincoln procured a copy and gave it to his Springfi Breckenridge 72, Bell 39, and Douglas 12. Lincoln electors were chosen in seventeen of the freeJersey,--owing to a fusion between Democrats, Lincoln secured four and Douglas three of the electoras secured only one entire State--Missouri. Mr. Lincoln having now been elected, there remained, be[8 more...]
Stephen T. Logan (search for this): chapter 16
e hosts were gathered for the great convention in Chicago. David Davis had rented rooms in the Tremont House and opened up Lincoln's headquarters. I was not a delegate, but belonged to the contingent which had Lincoln's interests in charge. Judge Logan was the Springfield delegate, and to him Lincoln had given a letter authorizing the withdrawal of his name whenever his friends deemed such action necessary or proper. Davis was the active man, and had the business management in charge. If aritten in pencil, I agree with Seward in his Irrepressible Conflict, but I do not endorse his Higher Law doctrine. Then he added in words underscored. Make no contracts that will bind me. This paper was brought into the room where Davis, Judd, Logan, and I were gathered, and was read to us. But Lincoln was down in Springfield, some distance away from Chicago, and could therefore not appreciate the gravity of the situation; at least so Davis argued, and, viewing it in that light, the latter w
r questions which the people are just now caring about, and it will result in gaining no single electoral vote in the South, and losing every one in the North. --Ms. letter to M. W. Delahay.--hearers and were enthusiastically approved. By the close of the year he was back again in the dingy law office in Springfield. The opening of the year 1860 found Mr. Lincoln's name freely mentioned in connection with the Republican nomination for the Presidency. To be classed with Seward, Chase, McLean, and other celebrities was enough to stimulate any Illinois lawyer's pride; but in Mr. Lincoln's case, if it had any such effect, he was most artful in concealing it. Now and then some ardent friend, an editor, for example, would run his name up to the mast-head, but in all cases he discouraged the attempt. In regard to the matter you spoke of, he answered one man who proposed his name, I beg that you will not give it a further mention. Seriously, I do not think I am fit for the Presidency
W. M. Morris (search for this): chapter 16
as filled with disgust. If his address in 1852, over the death of Clay, proved that he was no eulogist, then this last effort demonstrated that he was no lecturer. Invitations to deliver the lecture — prompted no doubt by the advertisement given him in the contest with Douglas — came in very freely; but beyond the three attempts named, he declined them all. Press of business in the courts afforded him a convenient excuse, and he retired from the field. Springfield, March 28, 1859. W. M. Morris, Esq., Dear Sir:--Your kind note inviting me to deliver a lecture at Galesburg is received. I regret to say I cannot do so now; I must stick to the courts awhile. I read a sort of lecture to three different audiences during the last month and this; but I did so under circumstances which made it a waste of no time whatever. Yours very truly, A. Lincoln. He returned to the city two years after with a fame as wide as the continent, with the laurels of the Douglas contest on h
John G. Nicolay (search for this): chapter 16
convention, to the rights of all the states and territories and people of the nation, to the inviolability of the Constitution, and the perpetual union, prosperity, and harmony of all, I am most happy to cooperate for the practical success of the principles declared by the convention. Your obliged friend and fellow-citizen, Abraham Lincoln. Hon. George Ashmun. Mr. Lincoln moved his headquarters from our office to a room in the State House building, and there, with his secretary, John G. Nicolay, he spent the busy and exciting days of his campaign. Of course he attended to no law business, but still he loved to come to our office of evenings, and spend an hour with a few choice friends in a friendly privacy which was denied him at his public quarters. These were among the last meetings we had with Lincoln as our friend and fellow at the bar; and they are also the most delightful recollections any of us have retained of him. One of what Lincoln regarded as the remarkable fe
Ebenezer Peek (search for this): chapter 16
nswered one man who proposed his name, I beg that you will not give it a further mention. Seriously, I do not think I am fit for the Presidency. Letter. March 5, 1859, to Thomas J. Pickett. The first effort in his behalf as a Presidential aspirant was the action taken by his friends at a meeting held in the State House early in 1860, in the rooms of O. M. Hatch, then Secretary of State. Besides Hatch there were present Norman B. Judd, chairman of the Republican State Committee, Ebenezer Peek, Jackson Grimshaw, and others of equal prominence in the party, we all expressed a personal preference for Mr. Lincoln, relates one who was a participant in the meeting, Jackson Grimshaw. Letter, Quincy, Ill., April 28, 1866, Ms. as the Illinois candidate for the Presidency, and asked him if his name might be used at once in connection with the nomination and election. With his characteristic modesty he doubted whether he could get the nomination even if he wished it, and asked unti
Thomas J. Pickett (search for this): chapter 16
stimulate any Illinois lawyer's pride; but in Mr. Lincoln's case, if it had any such effect, he was most artful in concealing it. Now and then some ardent friend, an editor, for example, would run his name up to the mast-head, but in all cases he discouraged the attempt. In regard to the matter you spoke of, he answered one man who proposed his name, I beg that you will not give it a further mention. Seriously, I do not think I am fit for the Presidency. Letter. March 5, 1859, to Thomas J. Pickett. The first effort in his behalf as a Presidential aspirant was the action taken by his friends at a meeting held in the State House early in 1860, in the rooms of O. M. Hatch, then Secretary of State. Besides Hatch there were present Norman B. Judd, chairman of the Republican State Committee, Ebenezer Peek, Jackson Grimshaw, and others of equal prominence in the party, we all expressed a personal preference for Mr. Lincoln, relates one who was a participant in the meeting, Jac
Schoolmaster (search for this): chapter 16
tures of his canvass for President was the attitude of some of his neighbors in Springfield. A poll of the voters had been made in a little book and given to him. On running over the names he found that the greater part of the clergy of the city — in fact all but three--were against him. This depressed him somewhat, and he called in Dr. Newton Bateman, who as Superintendent of Public Instruction occupied the room adjoining his own in the State House, and whom he habitually addressed as Mr. Schoolmaster. He commented bitterly on the attitude of the preachers and many of their followers, who, pretending to be believers in the Bible and God-fearing Christians, yet by their votes demonstrated that they cared not whether slavery was voted up or down. God cares and humanity cares, he reflected, and if they do not they surely have not read their Bible aright. At last the turmoil and excitement and fatigue of the campaign were over: the enthusiastic political workers threw aside their ca
nation for the Presidency. To be classed with Seward, Chase, McLean, and other celebrities was enout congratulations on the part of his friends. Seward was the great man of the day, but Lincoln had s irrepressible conflict attracted warriors to Seward's standard in the Mississippi valley. It was d any kind of personal organization whatever. Seward had all these things, and, behind them all, a l as well. His eye was constantly fastened on Seward, who had already freely exercised the rights oland are a drawback upon the prospects of Governor Seward; and Trumbull writes Dubois to the same etates are safe enough in the fall. But, while Seward may have lost ground near his home, he was acqsas has appointed delegates and instructed for Seward. Don't stir them up to anger, but come along is already well familiar. On the first ballot Seward led, but was closely followed by Lincoln; on tLincoln had marked three passages referring to Seward's position on the slavery question. On the ma[1 more...]
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