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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ular vote of 1,857,610 for Lincoln; 1,291,574 for Douglas; 850,022 for Breckenridge; and 646,124 for Bell. In the electoral college Lincoln received 180 votes, Breckenridge 72, Bell 39, and Douglas 12. Lincoln electors were chosen in seventeen of the free States, as follows: Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, California, Oregon; and in one State,--New Jersey,--owing to a fusion between Democrats, Lincoln secured four and Douglas three of the electors. Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia. Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North and South Carolina, and Texas went for Breckenridge; Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia for Bell; while Douglas secured only one entire State--Missouri. Mr. Lincoln having now been elected, there remained, before taking up the reins of government, the details of his departure from Springfield, and the selection of a cabinet.
Atchison, Kan. (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
paper slips of all the speeches made during the debate, and proposed to him their publication in book form; but the man declined, fearing there would be no demand for such a book. Subsequently, when the speeches were gotten out in book form in Ohio, Mr. Lincoln procured a copy and gave it to his Springfield friend, writing on the fly-leaf, Compliments of A. Lincoln. thus proving anew that a prophet is not without honor, save in his own country. In December he visited Kansas, speaking at Atchison, Troy, Leavenworth, and other towns near the border. His speeches there served to extend his reputation still further westward. Though his arguments were; repetitions of the doctrine laid down in the contest with Douglas, yet they were new to the majority of his Kansas How Mr. Lincoln stood on the questions of the hour, after his defeat by Douglas, is clearly shown in a letter written on the 14th of May, 1859, to a friend in Kansas, who had forwarded him an invitation to attend a Repub
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
l a little woman down the street the news! In the evening his friends and neighbors called to congratulate him. He thanked them feelingly and shook them each by the hand. A day later the committee from the convention, with George Ashmun, of Massachusetts, at its head, called, and delivered formal notice of his nomination. This meeting took place at his house. His response was couched in polite and dignified language; and many of the committee, who now met him for the first time, departed wi50,022 for Breckenridge; and 646,124 for Bell. In the electoral college Lincoln received 180 votes, Breckenridge 72, Bell 39, and Douglas 12. Lincoln electors were chosen in seventeen of the free States, as follows: Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, California, Oregon; and in one State,--New Jersey,--owing to a fusion between Democrats, Lincoln secured four and Doug
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
excuse, and he retired from the field. Springfield, March 28, 1859. W. M. Morris, Esq., Det he had failed to induce any publisher in Springfield to undertake the enterprise, A gentleman Lincoln procured a copy and gave it to his Springfield friend, writing on the fly-leaf, Complimente was back again in the dingy law office in Springfield. The opening of the year 1860 found Mr.left for California. Lincoln's return to Springfield after his dazzling success in the East was ails that Lincoln sat still in his chair in Springfield, and that one of those unlooked-for-tides iand was read to us. But Lincoln was down in Springfield, some distance away from Chicago, and couldoflowing is a copy of the original Ms.: Springfield, Ill., October 10, 1860. Dear William: I cawing is Lincoln's letter of acceptance: Springfield, Ill., June 23, 1860. Sir: I accept the nomeins of government, the details of his departure from Springfield, and the selection of a cabinet. [5 more...]
Clinton, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
part of the State, but it was so commonplace, and met with such indifferent success, that he soon dropped it altogether. As we were going to Danville court I read to Lincoln a lecture by Bancroft on the wonderful progress of man, delivered in the preceding November. Sometime later he told us-Swett and me — that he had been thinking much on the subject and believed he would write a lecture on Man and His Progress. Afterwards I re a~d in a paper that he had come to either Bloomington or Clinton to lecture and no one turned out. The paper added, That doesn't look much like his being President. I once joked him about it;, e s? id good-naturedly Don't; that plagues me. --Henry a. Whitney letter, Aug. 27, 1867. The effort met with the disapproval of his friends, and he himself was filled with disgust. If his address in 1852, over the death of Clay, proved that he was no eulogist, then this last effort demonstrated that he was no lecturer. Invitations to deliver the lecture — prom
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
nces of deep and unusual emotion. As the balloting progressed he had gone to the office of the Journal, and was sitting in a large arm-chair there when the news of his nomination came. What a line of scenes, stretching from the barren glade in Kentucky to the jubilant and enthusiastic throng in the Wigwam at Chicago, must have broken in upon his vision as he hastened from the newspaper office to tell a little woman down the street the news! In the evening his friends and neighbors called to cew Jersey,--owing to a fusion between Democrats, Lincoln secured four and Douglas three of the electors. Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia. Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North and South Carolina, and Texas went for Breckenridge; Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia for Bell; while Douglas secured only one entire State--Missouri. Mr. Lincoln having now been elected, there remained, before taking up the reins of government, the details of his departure from Springfield, and the selec
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
peaking in New England. Looming up. preparing for Chicago. letters to a friend. the Decatur convention. Jodid not exceed $3,000; yet the party's committee in Chicago were dunning their late standard-bearer, who, besidof the generous and wealthy members of the party in Chicago or elsewhere did not come forward and volunteer they say this: If you shall be appointed a delegate to Chicago I will furnish one hundred dollars to bear the expeincoln, promising to bring the Kansas delegation to Chicago for him if he would only pay his expenses. Lincolnthe hosts were gathered for the great convention in Chicago. David Davis had rented rooms in the Tremont Houseon the editor of the Springfield Journal arrived in Chicago with a copy of the Missouri Democrat, in which Lincln was down in Springfield, some distance away from Chicago, and could therefore not appreciate the gravity of e jubilant and enthusiastic throng in the Wigwam at Chicago, must have broken in upon his vision as he hastened
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ut honor, save in his own country. In December he visited Kansas, speaking at Atchison, Troy, Leavenworth, and other towns est with Douglas, yet they were new to the majority of his Kansas How Mr. Lincoln stood on the questions of the hour, aft a letter written on the 14th of May, 1859, to a friend in Kansas, who had forwarded him an invitation to attend a RepublicaA letter written by Lincoln about this time to a friend in Kansas serves to illustrate his methods, and measures the extent f the problem. In the middle of April he again writes his Kansas friend: Reaching home last night I found yours of the 7th.s course in the contest with Douglas. Lincoln's friend in Kansas, instead of securing that delegation for him, had sufferedes Lincoln, in a burst of surprise, that, since you wrote, Kansas has appointed delegates and instructed for Seward. Don't March 13, 1861. —, Esq. My Dear Sir: You will start for Kansas before I see you again; and when I saw you a moment this m
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
lar vote of 1,857,610 for Lincoln; 1,291,574 for Douglas; 850,022 for Breckenridge; and 646,124 for Bell. In the electoral college Lincoln received 180 votes, Breckenridge 72, Bell 39, and Douglas 12. Lincoln electors were chosen in seventeen of the free States, as follows: Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, California, Oregon; and in one State,--New Jersey,--owing to a fusion between Democrats, Lincoln secured four and Douglas three of the electors. Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia. Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North and South Carolina, and Texas went for Breckenridge; Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia for Bell; while Douglas secured only one entire State--Missouri. Mr. Lincoln having now been elected, there remained, before taking up the reins of government, the details of his departure from Springfield, and the selection of a cabinet.
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
he 6th of November. The result showed a popular vote of 1,857,610 for Lincoln; 1,291,574 for Douglas; 850,022 for Breckenridge; and 646,124 for Bell. In the electoral college Lincoln received 180 votes, Breckenridge 72, Bell 39, and Douglas 12. Lincoln electors were chosen in seventeen of the free States, as follows: Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, California, Oregon; and in one State,--New Jersey,--owing to a fusion between Democrats, Lincoln secured four and Douglas three of the electors. Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia. Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North and South Carolina, and Texas went for Breckenridge; Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia for Bell; while Douglas secured only one entire State--Missouri. Mr. Lincoln having now been elected, there remained, before taking up the reins of government, the details of his departure from S
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