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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
plainer figure put it: Just before I struck the old mare my will through the mind had set the muscles of my tongue to utter the expression, and when her heels came in contact with my head the whole thing stopped half-cocked, as it were, and was only fired off when mental energy or force returned. By the time he had reached his seventeenth year he had attained the physical proportions of a full-grown man. He was employed to assist James Taylor in the management of a ferry-boat across the Ohio river near the mouth of Anderson's creek, but was not allowed a man's wages for the work. He received thirty-seven cents a day for what he afterwards told me was the roughest work a young man could be made to do. In the midst of whatever work he was engaged on he still found time to utilize his pen, He prepared a composition on the American Government, calling attention to the necessity of preserving the Constitution and perpetuating the Union, which with characteristic modesty he turned over
Warrick (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
would frequently make political speeches to the boys; he was always calm, logical, and clear. His jokes and stories were so odd, original, and witty all the people in town would gather around him. He would keep them till midnight. Abe was a good talker, a good reasoner, and a kind of newsboy. He attended all the trials before the squire, as that important functionary was called, and frequently wandered off to Boonville, a town on the river, distant fifteen miles, and the county seat of Warrick County, to hear and see how the courts were conducted there. On one occasion, at the latter place, he remained during the trial of a murderer and attentively absorbed the proceedings. A lawyer named Breckenridge represented the defense, and his speech so pleased and thrilled his young listener that the latter could not refrain from approaching the eloquent advocate at the close of his address and congratulating him on his signal success. How Breckenridge accepted the felicitations of the awk
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ment. the journey with Allen Gentry to New Orleans. return to Indiana. Customs and superstition of the pioneers. reappearance of the milk sick. removal to Illinois. Abe and his pet dog. The first law book Lincoln ever read was The statutes of Indiana. He obtained the volume from his friend David Turnham, who testifies prospect and grieving over the loss of his stock, proposed a move further westward. Returning emigrants had brought encouraging news of the newly developed state of Illinois. Vast stretches of rich alluvial lands were to be had there on the easiest of terms. Besides this, Indiana no longer afforded any inducements to the poos Gentry, and his grain and stock to young David Turnham, he loaded his household effects into a wagon drawn by two yoke of oxen, and in March, 1830, started for Illinois. The two daughters of Mrs. Lincoln had meanwhile married Dennis Hanks and Levi Hall, and with these additions the party numbered thirteen in all. Abe had just p
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
d attentively absorbed the proceedings. A lawyer named Breckenridge represented the defense, and his speech so pleased and thrilled his young listener that the latter could not refrain from approaching the eloquent advocate at the close of his address and congratulating him on his signal success. How Breckenridge accepted the felicitations of the awkward, hapless youth we shall probably never know. The story is told that during Lincoln's term as President, he was favored one day at the White House with a visit by this same Breckenridge, then a resident of Texas, who had called to pay his respects. In a conversation about early days in Indiana, the President, recalling Breckenridge's argument in the murder trial, remarked, If I could, as I then thought, have made as good a speech as that, my soul would have been satisfied; for it was up to that time the best speech I had ever heard. No feature of his backwoods life pleased Abe so well as going to mill. It released him from a d
Rockport, Ind. (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
oor that he could not be spared from the farm on which they lived. He related to me in my office one day, says Pitcher, an account of his payment to Crawford of the damage done to the latter's book-Weems' Life of Washington. Lincoln said, You see, I am tall and long-armed, and I went to work in earnest. At the end of the two days there was not a corn-blade left on a stalk in the field. I wanted to pay full damage for all the wetting the book got, and I made a clean sweep. a lawyer at Rockport, who with faintly concealed enthusiasm, declared the world couldn't beat it. An article on Temperance was shown under similar circumstance to Aaron Farmer, a Baptist preacher of local renown, and by him furnished to an Ohio newspaper for publication. The thing, however, which gave him such prominencea prominence too which could have been attained in no other way — was his remarkable physical strength, for he was becoming not only one of the longest, but one of the strongest men around Ge
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
with Allen Gentry to New Orleans. return to Indiana. Customs and superstition of the pioneers. aw book Lincoln ever read was The statutes of Indiana. He obtained the volume from his friend Davire from an interesting old lady whom I met in Indiana in 1865. She was the wife of Josiah Crawfordhments for a woman reared in the backwoods of Indiana. She was not only impressed with Abe's earlyers. April 16, 1829. Records Spencer Co., Indiana. Reuben and Charles Grigsby on the same dor lost for years. Shortly before my trip to Indiana in 1865 a carpenter in Gentryville was rebuilpects. In a conversation about early days in Indiana, the President, recalling Breckenridge's argu, said an old lady whom I interviewed when in Indiana, of going eight or ten miles to church. The day, and it caused the usual stampede in southern Indiana. Dennis Hanks, discouraged by the prospeen induced to leave Kentucky for the hills of Indiana by the same rosy and alluring reports. He ha[2 more...]
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
he voyage. Abe's desire to make a river trip was at last satisfied, and he accompanied the proprietor's son, serving as bow hand. His pay was eight dollars a month and board. In due course of time the navigators returned from their expedition with the evidence of profitable results to gladden the heart of the owner. The only occurrence of interest they could relate of the voyage was the encounter with a party of marauding negroes at the plantation of Madame Duchesne, a few miles below Baton Rouge. Abe and Gentry, having tied up for the night, were fast asleep on their boat when aroused by the arrival of a crowd of negroes bent on plunder. They set to work with clubs, and not only drove off the intruders, but pursued them inland, then hastily returning to their quarters they cut loose their craft and floated down-stream till daylight. Before passing on further it may not be amiss to glance for a moment at the social side of life as it existed in Gentryville in Abe's day. We t
Adams Head (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
was formed, And yet no mate was found. The Lord then was not willing That man should be alone, But caused a sleep upon him, And from him took a bone. And closed the flesh instead thereof, And then he took the same And of it made a woman, And brought her to the man. Then Adam he rejoiced To see his loving bride A part of his own body, The product of his side. The woman was not taken From Adam's feet we see, So he must not abuse her, The meaning seems to be. The woman was not taken From Adam's head, we know, To show she must not rule him-- 'Tis evidently so. The woman she was taken From under Adam's arm, So she must be protected From injuries and harm. Poor Sarah, at whose wedding this song was sung, never lived to see the glory nor share in the honor that afterwards fell to the lot of her tall and angular brother. Within two years after her marriage she died in childbirth. Something in the conduct of the Grigsbys and their treatment of his sister gave Abe great offense, and
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ver the loss of his stock, proposed a move further westward. Returning emigrants had brought encouraging news of the newly developed state of Illinois. Vast stretches of rich alluvial lands were to be had there on the easiest of terms. Besides this, Indiana no longer afforded any inducements to the poor man. The proposition of Dennis met with the general assent of the Lincoln family, and especially suited the roving and migratory spirit of Thomas Lincoln. He had been induced to leave Kentucky for the hills of Indiana by the same rosy and alluring reports. He had moved four times since his marriage and in point of worldly goods was not better off than when he started in life. His land groaned under the weight of a long neglected incumbrance and, like many of his neighbors, he was ready for another change. Having disposed of his land to James Gentry, and his grain and stock to young David Turnham, he loaded his household effects into a wagon drawn by two yoke of oxen, and in Ma
Eden (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
to take of history. If we expect to know Lincoln thoroughly we must be prepared to take him as he really was. In 1826 Abe's sister Sarah was married to Aaron Gigsby, and at the wedding the Lincoln family sang a song composed in honor of the event by Abe himself. It is a tiresome doggerel and full of painful rhymes. I reproduce it here from the manuscript furnished me by Mrs. Crawford. The author and composer called it Adam and eve's wedding song. When Adam was created He dwelt in Eden's shade, As Moses has recorded, And soon a bride was made. Ten thousand times ten thousand Of creatures swarmed around Before a bride was formed, And yet no mate was found. The Lord then was not willing That man should be alone, But caused a sleep upon him, And from him took a bone. And closed the flesh instead thereof, And then he took the same And of it made a woman, And brought her to the man. Then Adam he rejoiced To see his loving bride A part of his own body, The product of his side.
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