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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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New Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
p his hat Lincoin drolly observed, It was out of respect for the eggs, not care for my hat. Having loaded the vessel with pork in barrels, corn, and hogs, these sturdy boatmen swung out into the stream. On April 19 they reached the town of New Salem, a place destined to be an important spot in the career of Lincoln. There they met with their first serious delay. The boat stranded on Rutledge's mill-dam and hung helplessly over it a day and a night. We unloaded the boat, narrated one of ved by the alternating swells and depressions of the landscape. Between peak and peak, through its bed of limestone, sand, and clay, sometimes kissing the feet of one bluff and then hugging the other, rolls the Sangamon river. The village of New Salem, which once stood on the ridge, was laid out in 1828; it became a trading place, and in 1836 contained twenty houses and a hundred inhabitants. In the days of land offices and stage-coaches it was a sprightly village with a busy market. Its p
Salem, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e remainder of the year there they must head her down-stream. In this emergency recourse was had to my cousin Rowan Herndon, who had had no little experience as a boatman, and who recommended the employment of Lincoln as a skilful assistant. These two inland navigators undertook therefore the contract of piloting the vessel — which had now become elephantine in proportions — through the uncertain channel of the Sangamon to the Illinois river. The average speed was four miles a day. At new Salem safe passage over the mill-dam was deemed impossible unless the same could be lowered or a portion removed. The affair at New Salem is thus described by Oliphant in the poem before referred to: And when we came to Salem dam, Up we went against it jam: We tried to cross with all our might, But found we couldn't and staid all night. To this, Cameron and Rutledge, owners of the mill, entered their most strenuous protest. The boat's officers responded that under the Federal Constitution
Beardstown (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
gh. the navigability of the Sangamon fully demonstrated. the vessel reaches Beardstown. After a fortnight of rough and fatiguing travel the colony of Indiana emi and floated down-stream. From the Sangamon they passed to the Illinois. At Beardstown their unique craft, with its sails made of planks and cloth, excited the amusuncement that he had purchased a stock of goods which were to follow him from Beardstown. He had again retained the services of Lincoln to assist him when his merchaoln was hired to pilot the vessel through to the Illinois river. Arriving at Beardstown the pilot was discharged, and returned on foot across the sand and hills to ti, a number of citizens — among the number Lincolnhad gone down the river to Beardstown to meet the vessel as she emerged from the Illinois. These were armed with ath her. Lincoln and Herndon, in charge of the vessel, piloted her through to Beardstown. There they were paid forty dollars each, according to contract, and bidding
Coles (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ned to the glowing descriptions of prosperity in the adjoining counties, and before his death moved three times in search of better times and a healthy location. In 1851 we find him living on forty acres of land on Goose Nest prairie, in Coles county, Illinois. The land bore the usual incumbrance — a mortgage for two hundred dollars, which his son afterwards paid. On the 17th of January, after suffering for many weeks from a disorder of the kidneys, he passed away at the ripe old age — as hiver. At St. Louis they disembarked, Offut remaining behind while Lincoln, Hanks, and Johnston started across Illinois on foot. At Edwardsville they separated, Hanks going to Springfield, while Lincoln and his stepbrother followed the road to Coles county, to which point old Thomas Lincoln had meanwhile removed. Here Abe did not tarry long, probably not over a month, but long enough to dispose most effectually of one Daniel Needham, a famous wrestler who had challenged the returned boatman to
Sangamon (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
he had selected was on a bluff overlooking the Sangamon river,--for these early settlers must always be in si death, his subject being the navigation of the Sangamon river. The man, after Abe's speech was through, took man, whose operations extended up and down the Sangamon river for many miles. Having heard glowing reports oe trip to New Orleans. Abe and I came down the Sangamon river in a canoe in March, 1831; landed at what is not neighborhood. In August the waters of the Sangamon river washed Lincoln in to New Salem. This once sprastures. Skirting the base of the bluff is the Sangamon river, which, coming around a sudden bend from the sone bluff and then hugging the other, rolls the Sangamon river. The village of New Salem, which once stood on the news of the coming of a steamboat down the Sangamon river — proof incontestable that the stream was navig and all the other towns along the now interesting Sangamon The final syllable of this name was then pronou
Sangamon County (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
sive man by all odds in the village. He was certainly an odd character, if we accept the judgment of his contemporaries. By some he is given the character of a clear-headed, brisk man of affairs. By others he is variously described as wild, noisy, and reckless, or windy, rattle-brained, unsteady, and Improvident. Despite the unenviable traits ascribed to him he was good at heart and a generous friend of Lincoln. His boast that the latter could outrun, whip, or throw down any man in Sangamon county was soon tested, as we shall presently see, for, as another has truthfully expressed it, honors such as Offut accorded to Abe were to be won before they were worn at New Salem. In the neighborhood of the village, or rather a few miles to the south-west, lay a strip of timber called Clary's Grove. The boys who lived there were a terror to the entire region — seemingly a necessary product of frontier civilization. They were friendly and good-natured; they could trench a pond, dig a bo
Macon county, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
the navigability of the Sangamon fully demonstrated. the vessel reaches Beardstown. After a fortnight of rough and fatiguing travel the colony of Indiana emigrants reached a point in Illinois five miles north-west of the town of Decatur in Macon county. John Hanks, son of that Joseph Hanks in whose shop at Elizabethtown Thomas Lincoln had learned what he knew of the carpenter's art, met and sheltered them until they were safely housed on a piece of land which he had selected for them five mng to the usual audience of undemonstrative stumps and voiceless trees. His first attempt at public speaking after landing in Illinois is thus described to me by John Hanks, whose language I incorporate: After Abe got to Decatur, or rather to Macon county, a man by the name of Posey came into our neighborhood and made a speech. It was a bad one, and I said Abe could beat it. I turned down a box and Abe made his speech. The other man was a candidate — Abe wasn't. Abe beat him to death, his sub
Anne Rutledge (search for this): chapter 5
oportions — through the uncertain channel of the Sangamon to the Illinois river. The average speed was four miles a day. At new Salem safe passage over the mill-dam was deemed impossible unless the same could be lowered or a portion removed. The affair at New Salem is thus described by Oliphant in the poem before referred to: And when we came to Salem dam, Up we went against it jam: We tried to cross with all our might, But found we couldn't and staid all night. To this, Cameron and Rutledge, owners of the mill, entered their most strenuous protest. The boat's officers responded that under the Federal Constitution and laws no one had the right to dam up or in any way obstruct a navigable stream, and they argued that, as they had just demonstrated that the Sangamon was navigable (?), they proposed to remove enough of the obstruction to let the boat through. Rowan Herndon, describing it to me in 1865, said: When we struck the dam she hung. We then backed off and threw the anc
tatement that he made three thousand rails for Major Warnick walking daily three miles to his work. During the intervals of leisure he read the few books obtainable, and continued the practice of extemporaneous speaking to the usual audience of undemonstrative stumps and voiceless trees. His first attempt at public speaking after landing in Illinois is thus described to me by John Hanks, whose language I incorporate: After Abe got to Decatur, or rather to Macon county, a man by the name of Posey came into our neighborhood and made a speech. It was a bad one, and I said Abe could beat it. I turned down a box and Abe made his speech. The other man was a candidate — Abe wasn't. Abe beat him to death, his subject being the navigation of the Sangamon river. The man, after Abe's speech was through, took him aside and asked him where he had learned so much and how he could do so well. Abe replied, stating his manner and method of reading, and what he had read. The man encouraged him t
E. P. Oliphant (search for this): chapter 5
man in Offut's store. the wrestle with Jack Armstrong. studying in the store. disappearance of Offut. the Talisman. Oliphant's poetry. the reception at Springfield. the Captain's wife. return trip of the Talisman. Rowan Herndon and Lincoln p arrival. A few lines under date of April 5, 1832, unsigned, but supposed to have been the product of a local poet--one Oliphant E. P. Oliphant, a lawyer.--were sung to the tune of Clar de Kitchen. I cannot refrain from inflicting a stanza or twE. P. Oliphant, a lawyer.--were sung to the tune of Clar de Kitchen. I cannot refrain from inflicting a stanza or two of this ode on the reader: O, Captain Bogue he gave the load, And Captain Bogue he showed the road; And we came up with a right good will, And tied our boat up to his mill. Now we are up the Sangamo, And here we'll have a grand hurra, So fill deemed impossible unless the same could be lowered or a portion removed. The affair at New Salem is thus described by Oliphant in the poem before referred to: And when we came to Salem dam, Up we went against it jam: We tried to cross with all
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