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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Jason Duncan (search for this): chapter 7
l oration, he broke down in the midst of his address. His voice was choked with deep emotion; he stood a few moments while his lips quivered in the effort to form the words of fervent praise he sought to utter, and the tears ran down his yellow and shrivelled cheeks. Every heart was hushed at the spectacle. After repeated efforts he found it impossible to speak, and strode away, bitterly sobbing, to the widow's carriage and was driven from the scene. It was shortly after this that Dr. Jason Duncan placed in Lincoln's hands a poem called Immortality. The piece starts out with the line, Oh! Why should the spirit of mortal be proud. Lincoln's love for this poem has certainly made it immortal. He committed these lines to memory, and any reference to or mention of Miss Rutledge would suggest them, as if to celebrate a grief which lay with continual heaviness on his heart. There is no question that from this time forward Mr. Lincoln's spells of melancholy became more intense than
Joshua F. Speed (search for this): chapter 7
on his heart. There is no question that from this time forward Mr. Lincoln's spells of melancholy became more intense than ever. In fact a tinge of this desperate feeling of sadness followed him to Springfield. He himself was somewhat superstitious about it, and in 1840-41 wrote to Dr. Drake, a celebrated physician in Cincinnati, describing his mental condition in a long letter. Dr. Drake responded, saying substantially, I cannot prescribe in your case without a personal interview. Joshua F. Speed, to whom Lincoln showed the letter addressed to Dr. Drake, writing to me from Louisville, November 30, 1866, says: I think he (Lincoln) must have informed Dr. Drake of his early love for Miss Rutledge, as there was a part of the letter which he would not read. It is shown by the declaration of Mr. Lincoln himself made to a fellow member Robert L. Wilson, Ms., letter, Feb. 10, 1866. of the Legislature within two years after Anne Rutledge's death that although he seemed to others to e
Mentor Graham (search for this): chapter 7
to work at once, and within a short time had accumulated by commendable effort a comfortable amount of property. Within three years he owned a farm, and a half interest with Samuel Hill in the leading store. He had good capacity for business, and was a valuable addition to that already pretentious village — New Salem. It was while living at James Cameron's house that this plucky and industrious young business man first saw Anne Rutledge. At that time she was attending the school of Mentor Graham, a pedagogue of local renown whose name is frequently met with in these pages, and who flourished in and around New Salem from 1829 to 1860. McNeil fell deeply in love with the school-girl — she was then only seventeen--and paid her the usual unremitting attentions young lovers of that age had done before him and are still doing today. His partner in the store, Samuel Hill, a young man of equal force of character, who afterwards amassed a comfortable fortune, and also wielded no little
R. B. Rutledge (search for this): chapter 7
d, is the language of this friend, and I was not surprised when it was rumored subsequently that his reason was in danger. One of Miss Rutledge's brothers R. B. Rutledge, Ms., letter, Oct. 21, 1866. says: The effect upon Mr. Lincoln's mind was terrible. He became plunged in despair, and many of his friends feared that reason pirit of mortal be proud. Lincoln's love for this poem has certainly made it immortal. He committed these lines to memory, and any reference to or mention of Miss Rutledge would suggest them, as if to celebrate a grief which lay with continual heaviness on his heart. There is no question that from this time forward Mr. Lincoln' letter addressed to Dr. Drake, writing to me from Louisville, November 30, 1866, says: I think he (Lincoln) must have informed Dr. Drake of his early love for Miss Rutledge, as there was a part of the letter which he would not read. It is shown by the declaration of Mr. Lincoln himself made to a fellow member Robert L. Wilson,
John M. Rutledge (search for this): chapter 7
forbear. You will find it in one of the standard hymn-books. It was likewise the last thing she ever sung.--Letter, John M. Rutledge, Ms., Nov. 25, 1866. The most astonishing and sad sequel to this courtship was the disastrous effect of Miss RuMiss Rutledge's death on Mr. Lincoln's mind. It operated strangely on one of his calm and stoical make-up. As he returned from the visit to the bedside of Miss Rutledge, he stopped at the house of a friend, who relates that his face showed signs of no liMiss Rutledge, he stopped at the house of a friend, who relates that his face showed signs of no little mental agony. He was very much distressed, is the language of this friend, and I was not surprised when it was rumored subsequently that his reason was in danger. One of Miss Rutledge's brothers R. B. Rutledge, Ms., letter, Oct. 21, 1866. Miss Rutledge's brothers R. B. Rutledge, Ms., letter, Oct. 21, 1866. says: The effect upon Mr. Lincoln's mind was terrible. He became plunged in despair, and many of his friends feared that reason would desert her throne. His extraordinary emotions were regarded as strong evidence of the existence of the tenderest
store to Hill, determined to return to New York, his native State, for a visit. He had accumulated up to this time, as near as we can learn, ten or possibly twelve thousand dollars. Before leaving he made to Anne a singular revelation. He told her the name McNeil was an assumed one; that his real name was McNamar. I left behind me in New York, he said, my parents and brothers and sisters. They are poor, and were in more or less need when I left them in 1829. I vowed that I would come West, make a fortune, and go back to help them. I am going to start now and intend, if I can, to bring them with me on my return to Illinois and place them on my farm. He expressed a sense of deep satisfaction in being able to clear up all mysteries which might have formed in the mind of her to whom he confided his love. He would keep nothing, he said, from her. They were engaged to be married, and she should know it all. The change of his name was occasioned by the fear that if the family in N
this time forward. He was acquiring property and money day by day. As one of the pioneers puts it, Men were honest then, and paid their debts at least once a year. The merchant surrounded by a rich country suffered little from competition. As he placed his goods on the shelf he added an advance of from seventy-five to one hundred and fifty per cent over cost price, and thus managed to get along. After managing thus for several years, McNeil, having disposed of his interest in the store to Hill, determined to return to New York, his native State, for a visit. He had accumulated up to this time, as near as we can learn, ten or possibly twelve thousand dollars. Before leaving he made to Anne a singular revelation. He told her the name McNeil was an assumed one; that his real name was McNamar. I left behind me in New York, he said, my parents and brothers and sisters. They are poor, and were in more or less need when I left them in 1829. I vowed that I would come West, make a f
November 25th, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 7
known as the Concord grave-yard, about seven miles north-west of the town of Petersburg. I have heard mother say that Anne would frequently sing for Lincoln's benefit. She had a clear, ringing voice. Early in her illness he called, and she sang a hymn for which he always expressed a great preference. It begins: Vain man, thy fond pursuits forbear. You will find it in one of the standard hymn-books. It was likewise the last thing she ever sung.--Letter, John M. Rutledge, Ms., Nov. 25, 1866. The most astonishing and sad sequel to this courtship was the disastrous effect of Miss Rutledge's death on Mr. Lincoln's mind. It operated strangely on one of his calm and stoical make-up. As he returned from the visit to the bedside of Miss Rutledge, he stopped at the house of a friend, who relates that his face showed signs of no little mental agony. He was very much distressed, is the language of this friend, and I was not surprised when it was rumored subsequently that his
uld not read. It is shown by the declaration of Mr. Lincoln himself made to a fellow member Robert L. Wilson, Ms., letter, Feb. 10, 1866. of the Legislature within two years after Anne Rutledge's death that although he seemed to others to enjoy life rapturously, yet when alone he was so overcome by mental depression he never dared to carry a pocket knife. It may not be amiss to suggest before I pass from mention of McNamar that, true to his promise, he drove into New Salem in the fall of 1835 with his mother and brothers and sisters. They had come through from New York in a wagon, with all their portable goods. Anne Rutledge had meanwhile died, and McNamar could only muse in silence over the fading visions of what might have been. On his arrival he met Lincoln, who, with the memory of their mutual friend, now dead, constantly before him, seemed desolate and sorely distressed. The little acre of ground in Concord cemetery contained the form of his first love, rudely torn from
incoln's love for this poem has certainly made it immortal. He committed these lines to memory, and any reference to or mention of Miss Rutledge would suggest them, as if to celebrate a grief which lay with continual heaviness on his heart. There is no question that from this time forward Mr. Lincoln's spells of melancholy became more intense than ever. In fact a tinge of this desperate feeling of sadness followed him to Springfield. He himself was somewhat superstitious about it, and in 1840-41 wrote to Dr. Drake, a celebrated physician in Cincinnati, describing his mental condition in a long letter. Dr. Drake responded, saying substantially, I cannot prescribe in your case without a personal interview. Joshua F. Speed, to whom Lincoln showed the letter addressed to Dr. Drake, writing to me from Louisville, November 30, 1866, says: I think he (Lincoln) must have informed Dr. Drake of his early love for Miss Rutledge, as there was a part of the letter which he would not read. I
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