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Browsing named entities in Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography.

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George Washington (search for this): chapter 1
enerally by dinner-giving, much feasting, and dancing-parties in the evening. The custom of making ceremonious calls on New Year's Day did not obtain in this country until later years. Usually the evening was taken up with social affairs as a finale to the festivities of the preceding holiday week. Washington's Birthday had its annual celebration by banquets, which were great events. Eloquent and patriotic speeches were made in response to the toasts. Thrilling stories were told of Washington and the battles of the Revolutionary War. A grand ball invariably followed the banquets, either at the mansion of some private individual or in a hall, and was attended by the eligible society people of every community. Extensive preparations, consuming much time of the most prominent members of society, were made for these celebrations of the natal day of the Father of His Country. Training Day, which usually occurred in midsummer, was anticipated with the wildest enthusiasm and outb
ut out those familiar scenes. He was one of nature's noblemen, and did the work of his Master most effectively. Father Thatcher, that learned and eccentric Methodist divine, whose rugged character was reflected in a most remarkable physiognomy e, was another of that wonderful phalanx of men who preached and prayed and worked for the church in those days. Father Thatcher was always so absorbed with some theological question or in the study of the Bible which he invariably carried with ing the fact that they all hunted for him, the old white horse could not be found by the boys of his host's family. Father Thatcher had to preach that day, so he forgot all about his horse being gone until, just as he was closing his sermon, he sawd brother, taking in the situation, stepped into the pulpit and pronounced the benediction. On another occasion, as Father Thatcher was walking along the street, through the open door of a comfortable home he saw a good mother and daughters sitting
McCormick (search for this): chapter 1
with the world was limited. Agriculture was the chief resource of the people. Every child was, to a certain extent, a producer, and children had to work part of each year before they had reached their teens. From early spring until the crops were in and the grain harvested the girls and boys had to assist in putting in the wheat and small grain that must be sown in the fall, and in gathering and garnering the corn and other products, and all without the aid of machinery. There were no McCormick reapers and harvesters, or Hough's ploughs and planters; but with oxen, mules, and horses men and boys ploughed all day long, while the women and weaker or aged men followed in the furrows, dropping the seeds by hand. The harvesting was done with cradle, scythe, or sickle, while men followed the skilful cradler, and by hand bound the bundles of rye, oats, and wheat. Others followed and shocked them in the fields till they had passed through the sweat and were ready for the thrashing-yard
frequent protracted meetings and revivals prominent preachers Doctor Bascom, the friend of Clay pulpit debates organization of the Campbelmortals, and some of their sermons were real inspirations. Reverend Doctor Bascom, of Kentucky, the friend of Henry Clay, was one of the mosttter opportunities of speakers and preachers. It is told of Doctor Bascom that, after he was made chaplain of the Senate, through the infmuch chagrined, but in no sense felt the keen mortification which Mr. Bascom himself experienced. He returned to his lodgings, and prostratedprayer to be forgiven for his vainglorious attempt to preach with Mr. Bascom uppermost in his mind. In the afternoon Mr. Clay sought his friehe were ill as the solution of the fiasco. As soon as he entered Mr. Bascom's apartments, the minister came forward to greet him cordially, sw completely I failed in my sermon this morning. I was preaching Mr. Bascom in all his glory, but wait until next Sunday, and I will preach J
George P. Dorris (search for this): chapter 1
ance I was born in Petersburgh, Boone County, Missouri, on the 15th day of August, 1838, of Irish-French ancestry. My father was a native of Lincoln County, Tennessee, but when quite a young man migrated to Petersburgh, as an employee of George P. Dorris, a merchant king of that day. Mr. Dorris had a dry-goods establishment in the town of Petersburgh, where my father met my mother, Elizabeth Hicks La Fontaine. Grandfather La Fontaine was one of the French Huguenots who settled in western IlMr. Dorris had a dry-goods establishment in the town of Petersburgh, where my father met my mother, Elizabeth Hicks La Fontaine. Grandfather La Fontaine was one of the French Huguenots who settled in western Illinois and Missouri at a very early date. My grandfather owned large tracts of land in Missouri and many slaves. My Grandmother La Fontaine was a cousin of General Sterling Price, of Mexican War and Confederate fame. When my father and mother were married, grandfather gave my mother, as a wedding-present, a colored man, his wife, and two children. Soon after my birth, my Grandfather Cunningham, having liberated his slaves in Tennessee, removed to southern Illinois, and became urgent for
Elizabeth Hicks La Fontaine (search for this): chapter 1
Church teachers from Massachusetts progress in education since pioneer days wide-spread ignorance I was born in Petersburgh, Boone County, Missouri, on the 15th day of August, 1838, of Irish-French ancestry. My father was a native of Lincoln County, Tennessee, but when quite a young man migrated to Petersburgh, as an employee of George P. Dorris, a merchant king of that day. Mr. Dorris had a dry-goods establishment in the town of Petersburgh, where my father met my mother, Elizabeth Hicks La Fontaine. Grandfather La Fontaine was one of the French Huguenots who settled in western Illinois and Missouri at a very early date. My grandfather owned large tracts of land in Missouri and many slaves. My Grandmother La Fontaine was a cousin of General Sterling Price, of Mexican War and Confederate fame. When my father and mother were married, grandfather gave my mother, as a wedding-present, a colored man, his wife, and two children. Soon after my birth, my Grandfather Cunningh
La Fontaine (search for this): chapter 1
a young man migrated to Petersburgh, as an employee of George P. Dorris, a merchant king of that day. Mr. Dorris had a dry-goods establishment in the town of Petersburgh, where my father met my mother, Elizabeth Hicks La Fontaine. Grandfather La Fontaine was one of the French Huguenots who settled in western Illinois and Missouri at a very early date. My grandfather owned large tracts of land in Missouri and many slaves. My Grandmother La Fontaine was a cousin of General Sterling Price, of MLa Fontaine was a cousin of General Sterling Price, of Mexican War and Confederate fame. When my father and mother were married, grandfather gave my mother, as a wedding-present, a colored man, his wife, and two children. Soon after my birth, my Grandfather Cunningham, having liberated his slaves in Tennessee, removed to southern Illinois, and became urgent for my father to come to him to look after him in his declining years. Full of filial affection, father decided that he could not resist Grandfather Cunningham's appeal. He therefore disp
John M. Cunningham (search for this): chapter 1
ousin of General Sterling Price, of Mexican War and Confederate fame. When my father and mother were married, grandfather gave my mother, as a wedding-present, a colored man, his wife, and two children. Soon after my birth, my Grandfather Cunningham, having liberated his slaves in Tennessee, removed to southern Illinois, and became urgent for my father to come to him to look after him in his declining years. Full of filial affection, father decided that he could not resist Grandfather CunCunningham's appeal. He therefore disposed of his business, liberated his slaves, and returned to southern Illinois. The country was new and population sparse; but my father, full of courage, made every effort to overcome all difficulties and hew his way to success. In his efforts he was ably seconded by my self-denying, loyal, and courageous mother, whose brilliant mind enabled her to devise ways and means of meeting every emergency. In a brief time my father became one of the most popular
ulture was the chief resource of the people. Every child was, to a certain extent, a producer, and children had to work part of each year before they had reached their teens. From early spring until the crops were in and the grain harvested the girls and boys had to assist in putting in the wheat and small grain that must be sown in the fall, and in gathering and garnering the corn and other products, and all without the aid of machinery. There were no McCormick reapers and harvesters, or Hough's ploughs and planters; but with oxen, mules, and horses men and boys ploughed all day long, while the women and weaker or aged men followed in the furrows, dropping the seeds by hand. The harvesting was done with cradle, scythe, or sickle, while men followed the skilful cradler, and by hand bound the bundles of rye, oats, and wheat. Others followed and shocked them in the fields till they had passed through the sweat and were ready for the thrashing-yard. Here was heard the stamp of many
Theodore Roosevelt (search for this): chapter 1
ng the corn with a hoe, or following the reapers, turning and raking the grain as it fell before the sickle. The blessed wives of pioneers fulfilled to the letter their marriage vows of devotion in sickness and in health, for richer or poorer. They were handmaidens when the family were in health, nurses and ofttimes physicians when any of the family were ill; even undertakers when death visited a household, unless, forsooth, that office was performed by some friend or neighbor. Ex-President Roosevelt's heart would have been delighted with the large families which were the rule, and not the exception, in those days. I have often heard mothers say they had no more trouble in caring for half a dozen children than for one because, in either case, it took all their time to look after the home and baby. When there were more than one the children took care of each other, and they could only give all their time under any circumstances. These children were reared by their own parents,
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