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Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
extravagant prices for their rooms and board as are paid for the far more comfortable apartments of to-day. They had not the privacy and convenience offered by the furnished housekeeping apartments, now so numerous. General John A. Rawlins, Secretary of War, lived in a modest house on the corner of M and Twelfth Streets. Mrs. Rawlins, like her husband, had very poor health. They had four children, the care of whom occupied much of Mrs. Rawlins's time. George M. Robeson, of Trenton, New Jersey, was appointed Secretary of the Navy. He was a widower at the time of his appointment, but afterward married Mrs. Aulick, widow of Commodore Aulick. Mr. Robeson rented a commodious house on K Street, formerly occupied by Secretary Stanton, of Mr. Lincoln's cabinet. Both the Secretary and Mrs. Robeson were fond of society and understood the art of entertaining royally. They had travelled extensively and had always lived handsomely. Mr. Robeson was a veritable bon vivant. Soon after
Christmas (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
days of adversity. Nothing she could do for these dear friends, who had been so much to her before fortune had smiled upon them, seemed onerous. Her only grief was that the President could not provide each one of the many with lucrative positions, and thereby improve their conditions in life. Many sought her aid, and were never turned away impatiently. She at least made an appeal for them. Every member of President Grant's cabinet had stories to tell of Mrs. Grant's kind heart. Every Christmas the asylums, hospitals, and charitable institutions in Washington received donations from Mrs. Grant, while the members of her family and her friends and their children were most generously remembered. She was the veritable Lady bountiful in more than one household. Her greatest fault, if she had faults, was her extreme leniency. She could never discipline either her servants or her children, her kind heart always suggesting some excuse for misdemeanors or neglect of duty. She was nev
Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
that it would take a much longer time than it really has taken to adjust political affairs in the late Confederate States. The tragedies of the early days of reconstruction are matters of history, and are not a part of my story. I make this digression to recall the chaos which confronted President Grant, who had had previously no sort of experience in legislative or executive affairs beyond those of a military character. Reports of outrages in almost every State south of the Mason and Dixon line, the evident wrong on both sides, and the responsibility for the protection of human life weighed heavily upon the chief executive. Grant appreciated that he was without power to issue orders as he had done when he was in command of a great army. All the winter of 1869-70 we were subject to daily startling reports of public scandals, defalcations, and high-handed outrages. The reckless extravagance practised during the war had so demoralized the money-making people of the country
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
d at night. The committee on the part of the Senate was composed of Hon. Richard Yates, of Illinois; A. H. Cragin, of New Hampshire; and T. C. McCreary, of Kentucky. They attended to the detailscame in together. Horace Greeley, Julia Ward Howe, Governors Jewell of Connecticut, Oglesby of Illinois, Curtin of Pennsylvania, Fenton of New York, and innumerable others, including many army and navy heroes were there, among them that illustrious Illinois soldier Major-General James H. Wilson, whose daring as a cavalry-officer placed him in the front rank of officers of that arm of the service.mmander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, and a representative-at-large from the State of Illinois, he had an innumerable constituency who made insatiable demands upon him. It required all elves disagreeable by expressing their distaste for their duties. General Horace Capron, of Illinois, was chosen commissioner of the Agricultural Bureau, then a bureau of the Interior Department.
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
sented themselves to President Grant at the White House, there was a large number of distinguished had occurred. Among the callers at the White House soon after the occupancy by President Grantiation that was made for the repairs in the White House. Congress had at that time a very differenhen President and Mrs. Grant moved into the White House, March 5, 1869, they consequently found it ate that we were constantly summoned to the White House for formal and informal dinners, lunches, adency, and their final establishment in the White House, she was still the unpretentious, sincere f a large theatre-party of children from the White House and the homes of the cabinet officers, espe of royalty than any other occupants of the White House. Among them were the Duke of Edinburgh, Eathing that had previously been given in the White House. Lady Thornton, with her tall, spare figureurteenth Street. Thus we were very near the White House. General Butler's residence on I Street, Za[11 more...]
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ajority, in fact all but Mrs. Williams, agreed with Mrs. Grant that they had no power to change Jefferson's code of official etiquette. Mrs. Williams said she, for one, would not make the first call on the families of senators. She very unwisely so informed many of the senators' wives and insisted they must call first on her, as the wife of the Attorney-General. This provoked the indignation of the senatorial ladies and many of their husbands, among them Senator Matthew H. Carpenter, of Wisconsin. Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase died, and General Williams's name, on account of his ability as a jurist and man of high character, was sent to the Senate as the proposed successor of Mr. Chase. The moment the Senate went into executive session Senator Carpenter made a violent speech against the confirmation of General Williams's name, making many charges against Mrs. Williams, accusing her of numberless peccadilloes, acceptance of presents without General Williams's knowledge from per
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
d which made Mr. Colfax the legal Vice-President of the United States, the Senate arose and, preceded by Chief Justice Chase,d prolonged conferences were held as to the duty of the United States in the matter of the various troubles in that unfortunar. Fish bitterly opposed any recognition of Cuba by the United States and finally carried his point, notwithstanding the urgee positions and always to the credit of himself and the United States. I saw not long since in the newspapers a most interesrant's entering upon his duties as the President of the United States the political caldron began to boil; and, while the Reply has taken to adjust political affairs in the late Confederate States. The tragedies of the early days of reconstructiven her on account of Senator Christiancy's position as United States senator. She was a shrinking, modest young woman, who evation from obscurity on the frontier to the wife of a United States senator had inspired her with an ambition which was des
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ostmaster-General, and Judge E. R. Hoar Attorney-General. Everybody applauded these appointments, and the political skies seemed clearer than they had been since the assassination of Mr. Lincoln. Few persons knew that Senator J. F. Wilson, of Iowa, then a member of the House, and one of the impeachment committee, was very strongly urged by President Grant to accept the position of Secretary of State. He even consented at one time to consider the matter favorably, but, subsequently learningroblem in assigning the chairmanships of the committees, with such men to choose from as Logan, Garfield, Banks, Schenck, Dawes, Allison, Windom, Holman, Brooks of New York, Williams, Orth, Myers, O'Neil, Shellabarger, Wilson of Indiana, Wilson of Iowa, Butler, Lochridge, Bingham, Stoughton, Paine, Wheeler of New York, Ingersoll, Cook, Cullom, Farnsworth, Frye, Hale, Judd, and a legion too numerous to mention. Mr. Blaine was then young and vigorous, and probably the most promising statesman of
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
was superb. There was a very great crowd, and, but for the solidity of the building and the perfect management it might have been most uncomfortable. About ten o'clock President Grant entered the reception-room assigned him. He was accompanied by Senator Morgan, of New York, and one or two others; Mrs. Grant was escorted by General George H. Thomas. Mr. and Mrs. Colfax came in together. Horace Greeley, Julia Ward Howe, Governors Jewell of Connecticut, Oglesby of Illinois, Curtin of Pennsylvania, Fenton of New York, and innumerable others, including many army and navy heroes were there, among them that illustrious Illinois soldier Major-General James H. Wilson, whose daring as a cavalry-officer placed him in the front rank of officers of that arm of the service. The capture of President Jefferson Davis, as he was fleeing from Richmond, was the crowning glory of his brilliant career. I remember seeing a group of such men as Porter, Farragut, Du Pont, Dahlgren, and Rogers togethe
Mason (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
he feeling that it would take a much longer time than it really has taken to adjust political affairs in the late Confederate States. The tragedies of the early days of reconstruction are matters of history, and are not a part of my story. I make this digression to recall the chaos which confronted President Grant, who had had previously no sort of experience in legislative or executive affairs beyond those of a military character. Reports of outrages in almost every State south of the Mason and Dixon line, the evident wrong on both sides, and the responsibility for the protection of human life weighed heavily upon the chief executive. Grant appreciated that he was without power to issue orders as he had done when he was in command of a great army. All the winter of 1869-70 we were subject to daily startling reports of public scandals, defalcations, and high-handed outrages. The reckless extravagance practised during the war had so demoralized the money-making people of t
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