hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John A. Logan 1,269 25 Browse Search
Nellie Grant 462 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 342 6 Browse Search
Chicago (Illinois, United States) 216 0 Browse Search
Illinois (Illinois, United States) 208 0 Browse Search
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) 198 0 Browse Search
Robert T. Lincoln 153 3 Browse Search
James G. Blaine 150 4 Browse Search
United States (United States) 128 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 126 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography. Search the whole document.

Found 506 total hits in 139 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Williamson (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ry one in a state of excitement and apprehension. The very thought of civil war carried with it a heart-sickening terror, and completely demoralized the people. Senator Douglas had died very suddenly in Washington, and Mr. Logan was left almost alone to face the excited, reckless people of southern Illinois. Finally the day arrived upon which Mr. Logan was to reach home. J. H. White, later lieutenant-colonel of the 31st Infantry, which Mr. Logan raised; Mr. Swindell, sheriff of Williamson County; one or two others; and myself had canvassed the county on horseback. Going to the houses of the coolest-headed and most reliable men, we asked them to come to the town of Marion on that day that they might hear Mr. Logan, who was advertised to speak to the people in the public square; also asking them to be ready to protect him or to quell any disturbance should mob violence be attempted if he failed to impress them favorably. It was one of those hot, dusty days in that semitropi
Marion, Williamson County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
e election returns were in and Mr. Logan was declared elected to represent the Ninth Congressional District in the Thirty-seventh Congress, he began to arrange his affairs to go on to Washington to be sworn in March 4, 1859. We went to Marion, Williamson County, to spend the Christmas holidays with my father and mother, and to visit Mother Logan who lived twenty-four miles west of Marion, at Murphysboro, Jackson County. On account of the discomfort of travelling in winter, we were afraid to ommit themselves to secession. Mr. Logan, however, returned to Washington to take part in the proceedings of Congress at the extra session to provide ways and means for supporting, arming, and equipping the troops. Arriving at Marion, Williamson County, Illinois, where we then resided, we were not prepared for the state of public mind that greeted us. Constituents hitherto full of enthusiasm and cordial greeting met us with restraint, expressing eagerness to know what was going to be done
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
the thirty-seventh congress the journey to Washington Railway travel in 1859 installed at Brown' he began to arrange his affairs to go on to Washington to be sworn in March 4, 1859. We went to Ma would be passable, I waited until I reached Washington to obtain what I should require further. lroad, to the national capital. Going to Washington in those days was a very different affair frast stopping-place for meals before reaching Washington. Hungry and weary, we all responded with avd honey and hurry to the train. Reaching Washington in the early evening, we had scarcely descend abetting revolution. He then departed for Washington, promising them his faithful devotion to thend fault-finding with what was being done in Washington, to interpret the meaning of every move Nort. Senator Douglas had died very suddenly in Washington, and Mr. Logan was left almost alone to face the State, and the Secretary of War, at Washington, D. C. Consequently and fortunately, I had but [9 more...]
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ral social festivities on the verge of war the theatres firing on Sumter public opinion at home Logan's stand for the union his speech at remember well how, during the whole winter preceding the firing on Sumter, day after day he pleaded with leaders for a compromise, and with wsed secession resolutions. Then came echoes of the fatal firing on Sumter and all the fearful consequences that followed. Mr. Lincoln, with nd Dixon line. Fortunately, the electric shock of the firing on Sumter startled the whole country, awakened the latent patriotism of the n rumors of the coming conflict, the defiant threatenings of seizing Sumter, and the seceding of States from the Union effectually stopped all greater, reaching a higher pitch when the sound of the firing upon Sumter was flashed across the country. The seizure of the forts in Charlefused. At the same time they blamed the South for the attack on Fort Sumter. Many of them had kindred in the South whom they dearly loved,
Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
recently occupied by the late Justice Bradley. Their home was one of the most ambitious in the city, with its lovely picture gallery, spacious drawing-rooms, fine library, and luxurious surroundings. Adjoining was the home of Senator Rice, of Minnesota; that of Senator Breckenridge, of Kentucky, adjoined Rice's. All day the callers came and went. Mrs. Douglas, one of the most diplomatic women of her time, received her guests with matchless grace and cordiality, presenting them to her assistanating wife, nee Miss Parker; the Livingstons; Minister Bodisco and his charming wife; Cochrane, of New York; Banks, of Alabama; General Magruder; Mr. Clingman; Mr. and Mrs. Vance; Mr. Harris, of Virginia; John C. Breckenridge; Senator Rice, of Minnesota; Chief Justice Taney; Barkesdale, member of Congress from Mississippi, who was later killed in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Stephen A. Douglas; Hon. William Kellogg, of Illinois; Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Pryor; Doctor Garnett; Senat
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Colonel Ross and J. C. Robinson, members of Congress from Illinois; Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Turner, of Louisville, Kentucky; Mr. each other suggested continuation of their discussions. Illinois was then represented in the United States Senate by Willi should be inaugurated at all hazards.“ As a senator from Illinois, he was most active on the committee of arrangements for e Civil War; Stephen A. Douglas; Hon. William Kellogg, of Illinois; Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Pryor; Doctor Garnett; Senator Judter's death in the early sixties; Mr. and Mrs. Foulke, of Illinois; Senator Edward Baker, killed at Ball's Bluff in 1862; Coe soldiers at the front. Returning to our home in southern Illinois, we found that the proximity of that section to the s almost alone to face the excited, reckless people of southern Illinois. Finally the day arrived upon which Mr. Logan wasthe details of raising his regiment, and so sure that southern Illinois would be true to the Union, that he seemed almost hap
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ts designing costumes, hats, and other necessities for a lady's wardrobe. We were too far from Saint Louis or Chicago for me to avail myself of city dressmakers and milliners; consequently, after getting together what I thought would be passable, I waited until I reached Washington to obtain what I should require further. A few days before Thanksgiving we bade good-by to the numerous friends and neighbors and started, via the Illinois Central and the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad, to Cincinnati; thence, via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to the national capital. Going to Washington in those days was a very different affair from that of the present. The crude railroading, the uncomfortable, barren, low-berthed sleeping-cars can never be forgotten. The road-beds were rough, and the rolling-stock worse. This, together with the zigzag track of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad through the Alleghany Mountains, made travelling a question of physical endurance; getting over groun
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
lled at Brown's Hotel the capital dominated by slaveholders a cab adventure President Buchanan and Miss Lane at the White House reception at Senator Douglas's re-election of Douglas to the Senate his loyalty to Lincoln arrival of Lincoln in Wlace in the social world at the capital. New Year's, 1860, I first witnessed the ceremonies of that day. Going to the White House, upon invitation of Mr. Buchanan, we watched with admiration the President, with all the dignity natural to him, and M experienced women who chaperoned me on occasions of great importance. No more courtly President has ever been in the White House than James Buchanan, whose innate refinement and dignified manners had been greatly enhanced by his experience at the court of Saint James. His charming niece, Miss Harriet Lane, who presided as mistress of the White House, was so queenly and gracious always that she has had no superior as the first lady of the land. I shall ever bless them for the cordial greeti
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
hth, P. B. Foulke; Ninth, John A. Logan-forming a galaxy of as strong men as the State has ever had in Congress; and it was not surprising that such representatives were destined to be conspicuous in the thrilling events that took place in the decade following. While the legislature was Democratic, Mr. Lincoln having carried the State by the popular vote the fear that Mr. Douglas would not be returned to the Senate was greatly augmented. When the legislature convened, there assembled at Springfield a great number of persons from all over the State who desired to influence its action. It was evident to the most stupid observer that Mr. Lincoln had made a national reputation during the campaign, and especially in the joint discussions, and that in his questions put to Douglas on the subject of slavery in the Territories he had set many men to questioning whether or not the policy of Mr. Douglas was a safe one for the best interests of the country north of the Mason and Dixon line; wh
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
a dernier ressort as a guarantee for the preservation of life and the protection of homes seems an anomaly, but such was the condition of things that from that hour we hoped for the best, and felt relieved from cruel suspense and agonizing forebodings. Colonel Logan was so absorbed with the details of raising his regiment, and so sure that southern Illinois would be true to the Union, that he seemed almost happy, keeping me busy driving back and forth between Carbondale, the telegraph station on the Illinois Central Railroad, and other points where he went to recruit the ten companies of which his regiment was composed. He would not trust any one else to send or receive the despatches he was constantly sending and receiving from the governor and adjutant-general of the State, who was at Springfield, the capital of the State, and the Secretary of War, at Washington, D. C. Consequently and fortunately, I had but little time to think of the future and all that it might hold for me.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...