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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
the head of his victorious army call for recognition. Maryland would have put out some of her resources, and her gallant youth would have helped swell the Southern ranks,--the twenty thousand soldiers who had dropped from the Confederate ranks during the severe marches of the summer would have been with us. Volunteers from all parts of the South would have come, swimming the Potomac to find their President and his field-marshal, while Union troops would have been called from Kentucky and Tennessee, and would have left easy march for the Confederate armies of the West to the Ohio River. Even though the Confederates were not successful, the fall elections were against the Federal administration. With the Southern armies victorious, the results of the contest at the polls would have been so pronounced as to have called for recognition of the Confederacy. General McClellan wrote General Halleck of the effect, in case of defeat of his army,-- But if we should be so unfortunate a
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
nor of Pennsylvania were handed General McClellan,--the former the celebrated lost despatch, given on a previous page,--the latter reading as follows: Harrisburg, Pa., September 13, 1862. Major-General George B. McClellan: When may we expect General Reynolds here Services needed immediately. Longstreet s division is said to have reached Hagerstown last night. Jackson crossed the Potomac at Williamsport to capture Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry. We are assembling militia rapidly at Chambersburg. Can we do anything to aid your movements A. G. Curtin Governor of Pennsylvania. This told of the change of march of my brigades from Turner's Pass to Hagerstown, and, with the lost despatch, revealed that Hill's five brigades were the only troops at the former place. The same afternoon General McClellan's signal service despatched him that the Union signal station on Maryland Heights had gone down. General Lee's signals failed to connect, so that General McClellan was bette
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
eral Lee's order distributing his forces and a despatch from the Governor of Pennsylvania were handed General McClellan,--the former the celebrated lost despatch, given on a previous page,--the latter reading as follows: Harrisburg, Pa., September 13, 1862. Major-General George B. McClellan: When may we expect General Reynolds here Services needed immediately. Longstreet s division is said to have reached Hagerstown last night. Jackson crossed the Potomac at Williamsport to capture Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry. We are assembling militia rapidly at Chambersburg. Can we do anything to aid your movements A. G. Curtin Governor of Pennsylvania. This told of the change of march of my brigades from Turner's Pass to Hagerstown, and, with the lost despatch, revealed that Hill's five brigades were the only troops at the former place. The same afternoon General McClellan's signal service despatched him that the Union signal station on Maryland Heights had gone down. Gener
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
o homeward defence. General Jackson wanted it till he got possession; then gave it up. General McClellan wanted to give it up before it was taken. After it had been taken and given up, he reoccupied it. It was left severely alone in the Gettysburg campaign,--an admission by both sides of its uselessness as a point d'appui. A word in closing about the chiefs opposed in this great campaign. General Lee and General McClellan were both graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point. The former took the second honor of the class of 1829, the latter the second honor of the class of 1846. Their service in the United States army was as military engineers. In 1854 they were both selected by Secretary of War Jefferson Davis for promotion to the new cavalry regiments as lieutenant-colonel and captain respectively. Their early opportunities, social and educational, were superior. They studiously improved them in youth, and applied them with diligence in after-life. Asp
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
h. From day to day the Confederates marched their dispersing columns, from day to day the Union columns converged in easy, cautious marches. At noon of the 13th, General Lee's order distributing his forces and a despatch from the Governor of Pennsylvania were handed General McClellan,--the former the celebrated lost despatch, given on a previous page,--the latter reading as follows: Harrisburg, Pa., September 13, 1862. Major-General George B. McClellan: When may we expect General Reynoldse reached Hagerstown last night. Jackson crossed the Potomac at Williamsport to capture Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry. We are assembling militia rapidly at Chambersburg. Can we do anything to aid your movements A. G. Curtin Governor of Pennsylvania. This told of the change of march of my brigades from Turner's Pass to Hagerstown, and, with the lost despatch, revealed that Hill's five brigades were the only troops at the former place. The same afternoon General McClellan's signal
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
seventeen brigades that should be at Turner's Pass, on the right rear of a column, moving against Crampton's. The razing of the walls of Jericho by encircling marches of priests and soldiers, at the signal of long-drawn blasts of sacred horns and shouts of the multitude, was scarcely a greater miracle than the transformation of the conquering army of the South into a horde of disordered fugitives before an army that two weeks earlier was flying to cover under its homeward ramparts. Providence helps those who can avail themselves of His tender care, but permits those who will to turn from Him to their own arrogance. That His gracious hand was with the Confederates in their struggles on the Chickahominy, and even through the errors of the Bull Run campaign, cannot be questioned. When, however, in self-confidence, they lost sight of His helping hand, and in contempt of the enemy dispersed the army, they were given up to the reward of vainglory. That the disaster was not overwh
Urbana (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
motion on the 10th. Close upon the heels of the march followed the Army of the Potomac, only twenty-five miles behind the rear of the Confederate army, with the cavalry of the armies in contact. The march of the former was as cautious as that of the latter was venturesome. On the 10th the Union commander was informed of the march of J. G. Walker's brigades up the river from Cheek's Ford. On the 11th his signal service reported the camp across the river at Point of Rocks. On the 12th, at Urbana, he was informed of the combination against Harper's Ferry, and the march towards the Cumberland Valley, and ordered pressing pursuit to force the Confederates to a stand. Under that order General Pleasonton, the Federal cavalry leader, hurried his troops and cleared the way to South Mountain on the 13th. From day to day the Confederates marched their dispersing columns, from day to day the Union columns converged in easy, cautious marches. At noon of the 13th, General Lee's order distrib
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 20
of her resources, and her gallant youth would have helped swell the Southern ranks,--the twenty thousand soldiers who had dropped from the Confederate ranks during the severe marches of the summer would have been with us. Volunteers from all parts of the South would have come, swimming the Potomac to find their President and his field-marshal, while Union troops would have been called from Kentucky and Tennessee, and would have left easy march for the Confederate armies of the West to the Ohio River. Even though the Confederates were not successful, the fall elections were against the Federal administration. With the Southern armies victorious, the results of the contest at the polls would have been so pronounced as to have called for recognition of the Confederacy. General McClellan wrote General Halleck of the effect, in case of defeat of his army,-- But if we should be so unfortunate as to meet with defeat, our country is at their mercy. So much has been said and writt
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
At noon of the 13th, General Lee's order distributing his forces and a despatch from the Governor of Pennsylvania were handed General McClellan,--the former the celebrated lost despatch, given on a previous page,--the latter reading as follows: Harrisburg, Pa., September 13, 1862. Major-General George B. McClellan: When may we expect General Reynolds here Services needed immediately. Longstreet s division is said to have reached Hagerstown last night. Jackson crossed the Potomac at Williamsport to capture Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry. We are assembling militia rapidly at Chambersburg. Can we do anything to aid your movements A. G. Curtin Governor of Pennsylvania. This told of the change of march of my brigades from Turner's Pass to Hagerstown, and, with the lost despatch, revealed that Hill's five brigades were the only troops at the former place. The same afternoon General McClellan's signal service despatched him that the Union signal station on Maryland Height
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
meet with defeat, our country is at their mercy. So much has been said and written about Harper's Ferry and the surrender of the garrison, that it seems difficult to pass it without notice. In more than one report General McClellan mentioned it as a shameful surrender. He had disapproved the position as false, and asked if it could not be given up. Colonel Miles, the commander, who gave his life in its defence, was acting under the following order from the department commander,viz.: Baltimore, September 5, 1862. Colonel Miles, Harper's Ferry: Rebellion Record, vol. XIX. part i. p. 520. The position on the heights ought to enable you to punish the enemy passing up the road in the direction of Harper's Ferry. Have your wits about you, and do all you can to annoy the rebels should they advance on you. Activity, energy, and decision must be used. You will not abandon Harper's Ferry without defending it to the last extremity. John E. Wool, Major-General. The simple tru
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