hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 376 16 Browse Search
John B. Hood 314 4 Browse Search
James Longstreet 312 12 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 306 36 Browse Search
Thomas J. Jackson 292 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 278 2 Browse Search
Lafayette McLaws 278 2 Browse Search
George E. Pickett 217 1 Browse Search
W. H. F. Lee 201 3 Browse Search
George G. Meade 190 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. Search the whole document.

Found 254 total hits in 80 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
G. Moxley Sorrel (search for this): chapter 31
's reserve was on the hill, and full of fight, even to the aggressive. We were pushed back through the valley and up the slope, until General Preston succeeded in getting his brigade under Trigg to the support. Our battery got up at last under Major Williams and opened its destructive fire from eleven guns, which presently convinced General Thomas that his position was no longer tenable. He drew Reynolds's division from its trenches near the angle, for assignment as rearguard. Lieutenant-Colonel Sorrel, of the staff, reported this move, and was sent with orders to General Stewart to strike down against the enemy's moving forces. It seems that at the same time Liddell's division of the extreme right of our right wing was ordered against the march of the reserves. Stewart got into part of Reynolds's line and took several hundred prisoners. Meanwhile, Reynolds was used in meeting the attack and driving back the division of General Liddell. That accomplished, he was ordered to pos
P. F. Liddell (search for this): chapter 31
rve corps under General W. H. T. Walker (Gist's and Liddell's divisions) was ordered into the Breckenridge batton supported the battle of his own brigade, and General Liddell was ordered with Govan's brigade to advance, pamy's moving forces. It seems that at the same time Liddell's division of the extreme right of our right wing wing the attack and driving back the division of General Liddell. That accomplished, he was ordered to positionding general or from the right wing, the repulse of Liddell's division was thought to indicate the strong holdi had not been in action gone in at the same time as Liddell's division, it is hardly possible that the Confedeand urged prompt execution. At the later hour when Liddell's division was passed beyond the enemy's intrenchmeour cavalry and right wing suggested the advance of Liddell's division to the Chattanooga road to try to check Reynolds's division was in season to aid in driving Liddell's division back to its former ground. Reynolds was
Edward S. Bragg (search for this): chapter 31
k. As the grand wheel to the left did not progress, I sent, at eleven o'clock, to say to General Bragg that my column of attack could probably break the enemy's line if he cared to have it go in. Before answer came, General Stewart, commanding my right division, received a message from General Bragg to go in and attack by his division, and reported that the Confederate commander had sent simn duty. After caring for and sending him off, and before we were through with our lunch, General Bragg sent for me. He was some little distance in rear of our new position. The change of the ord intrenched line in reverse, which General Hill thought to utilize by change of tactics, but General Bragg present, and advised of the opportunity, preferred his tactics, and urged prompt execution. eat of the enemy's forces. The forces engaged and their respective casualties follow: General Bragg's returns of the 20th of August-the last of record-reported his aggregate of all arms43,866
Colonel Roger Q. Mills (our afterwards distinguished statesman). General Thomas called repeatedly for reinforcements, and received assurances that they were coming, even to include the army if necessary to hold the left. Johnson's brigade of Cheatham's division was ordered to support the brigade under Colonel Mills, and the reserve corps under General W. H. T. Walker (Gist's and Liddell's divisions) was ordered into the Breckenridge battle, Gist's brigade against the left angle of the breasthe enemy, a shot would find a mark. The intrenched line was crumbling faster than we supposed, and their reserve was engaged in hot defensive battle to hold secure the Gap while yet there were two hours of daylight. Had the four brigades of Cheatham's division that had not been in action gone in at the same time as Liddell's division, it is hardly possible that the Confederate commander could have failed to find the enemy's empty lines along the front of his right wing, and called both win
S. B. Buckner (search for this): chapter 31
. Johnson and Hindman were ordered to follow in close echelon on Hood's left. Buckner's pivoting division under Preston was left to the position to which the Confedbearing. Johnson's and Hindman's divisions were called to a similar move, and Buckner's pivotal division under General Preston, but General Buckner objected to haviGeneral Buckner objected to having his left in the air. Presently a discouraging account came from General Hindman, that in the progress of his battle his left and rear had been struck by a formas called up and ordered spread at some convenient point while I rode with General Buckner and the staffs to view the changed conditions of the battle. I could see until out of reach of their fire. In the absence of a chief of artillery, General Buckner was asked to establish a twelve-gun battery on my right to enfilade the eny road. He was informed of orders given General Johnson for my left, and General Buckner for a battery on the right. I then offered as suggestion of the way to fi
James K. Polk (search for this): chapter 31
ps at hand to meet them. They had a four-gun battery of Slocum's of the Washington Artillery, That company did not go with the battalion to Virginia. and encountered Dodge's brigade and parts of Willick's, Berry's, and Stanley's, and superior artillery. In the severe contention General Adams fell seriously hurt, and the brigades were eventually forced back to and across the road, leaving General Adams on the field. A separate attack was then made by Cleburne's division, the brigades of Polk and Wood assaulting the breast-works held by the divisions of Johnson and Palmer. These brigades, after severe fight, were repulsed, and their positions were covered by Deshler's brigade. General Deshler received a mortal wound from a fragment of shell, leaving the brigade in the hands of the gallant Colonel Roger Q. Mills (our afterwards distinguished statesman). General Thomas called repeatedly for reinforcements, and received assurances that they were coming, even to include the army if
Peyton T. Manning (search for this): chapter 31
of Nassau bacon and Georgia sweet potatoes. We were not accustomed to potatoes of any kind in Virginia, and thought we had a luxury, but it was very dry, as the river was a mile and more from us, and other liquids were over the border. Then, before we had half finished, our pleasures were interrupted by a fragment of shell that came tearing through the woods, passed through a book in the hands of a courier who sat on his horse hard by reading, and struck down our chief of ordnance, Colonel P. T. Manning, gasping, as was supposed, in the struggles of death. Friends sprang forward to look for the wound and to give some aid and relief. In his hurry to enjoy and finish his lunch he had just taken a large bite of sweet potato, which seemed to be suffocating him. I suggested that it would be well to first relieve him of the potato and give him a chance to breathe. This done, he revived, his breath came freer, and he was soon on his feet ready to be conveyed to the hospital. In a few d
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 31
twelve hours after the retreat of the enemy's forces. The forces engaged and their respective casualties follow: General Bragg's returns of the 20th of August-the last of record-reported his aggregate of all arms43,866 Reinforced from J. E. Johnston's army in August9,000 Reinforced from J. E. Johnston's army in September (Gregg and McNair)2,500 Reinforced from General Lee's army, September 18 and 19 (a large estimate)5,000 Total60,366 Losses on the 18th and 19th1,124 Aggregate for bJ. E. Johnston's army in September (Gregg and McNair)2,500 Reinforced from General Lee's army, September 18 and 19 (a large estimate)5,000 Total60,366 Losses on the 18th and 19th1,124 Aggregate for battle on the 20th59,242 General Rosecrans's return of September 20, 1863, showed: Aggregate of infantry, equipped46,561 Aggregate of cavalry, equipped10,114 Aggregate of artillery, equipped4,192 Total60,867 Confederate losses (estimated; returns imperfect)17,800 Union losses by returns (infantry, artillery, and cavalry)16,550 The exceeding heaviness of these losses will be better understood, and the desperate and bloody character of the Chickamauga battle more fully appreciated, upon
Andrew A. Humphreys (search for this): chapter 31
orders reached General Hood in time to hold him and commanders on his left before he received notice from the commanding general, and the brigades of Kershaw and Humphreys were ordered nearer the rear of his column. The divisions of B. R. Johnson and Hindman were ordered to follow in close echelon on Hood's left. Buckner's pivotipushed to the front to take and pursue the assault. The divisions of B. R. Johnson and Hindman were pressed hard on Hood's left, and the brigades of Kershaw and Humphreys closed to his support, when a bold push gave us the first line of the enemy and a large number of his guns; but General Hood was fearfully wounded, supposed to bpushing on, with Hindman on his left, spreading battle to the enemy's limits; that Stewart's division would hold it on our right, and the brigades of Kershaw and Humphreys then on the quick step would be with us in a minute and help restore the battle to good organization. Just then these two brigades burst through the brush in ch
Gordon Granger (search for this): chapter 31
ned other elevated ground. The sound of battle in his rear, its fire drawing nearer, had attracted the attention of General Granger of the reserve corps, and warned him that it was the opportunity for his command. He marched, without orders, towarer hour when Liddell's division was passed beyond the enemy's intrenchments to strike at his reinforcing march under General Granger, the subordinate of the right wing could not see how he was to be justified in using a greater force in that directiare to retire, and called Reynolds's division from its trenches to be posted as rear-guard to cover the retreat. General Granger was then engaged in severe contention against my left at Snodgrass Hill. His march along the front of our cavalry a up, viz.: Your order to retire to this place was received a little after sunset and communicated to Generals Thomas and Granger. The troops are now moving back, and will be here in good shape and strong position before morning. Rebellion Record,
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8