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in meeting the attack, but only Beattie's brigade was in time for that service, the other brigades waiting to be relieved from their positions in line. Meanwhile, Baird's left had been extended by Dodge's brigade of Johnson's division of the Twentieth Corps. Before the Confederate commander engaged his battle he found the roadssed the Chattanooga road, changed front, and bore down against the enemy's left. This gave them favorable ground and position. They made resolute attack against Baird's left, threatening his rear, but he had troops at hand to meet them. They had a four-gun battery of Slocum's of the Washington Artillery, That company did not ghe Union reserve division under General Brannan to be drawn to the support of that front, and this attack, with that of the divisions of our right against those of Baird, Johnson, Palmer, and Reynolds, so disturbed General Thomas that other reinforcements were called to support his defence. General Stewart was in hot engagement
light hung heavy about the trees as if to hold down the voice of victory; but the two lines nearing as they advanced joined their continuous shouts in increasing volume, not as the burstings from the cannon's mouth, but in a tremendous swell of heroic harmony that seemed almost to lift from their roots the great trees of the forest. Before greetings and congratulations upon the success had passed it was night, and the mild beams of the quartering moon were more suggestive of Venus than of Mars. The haversacks and ammunition supplies were ordered replenished, and the Confederate army made its bivouac on the ground it had gained in the first pronounced victory in the West, and one of the most stubbornly contested battles of the war. Our cavalry had failed to close McFarland Gap, and through that General Thomas made his march for the stand at Rossville Gap. It has been stated that this retreat was made under the orders of the Union commander. General Thomas did, in fact, rec
Henry W. Slocum (search for this): chapter 31
ield-works. This brigade made desperate repeated and gallant battle until the commander, Benjamin H. Helm, one of the most promising brigadiers, was killed, when its aggressive work was suspended. The other brigades crossed the Chattanooga road, changed front, and bore down against the enemy's left. This gave them favorable ground and position. They made resolute attack against Baird's left, threatening his rear, but he had troops at hand to meet them. They had a four-gun battery of Slocum's of the Washington Artillery, That company did not go with the battalion to Virginia. and encountered Dodge's brigade and parts of Willick's, Berry's, and Stanley's, and superior artillery. In the severe contention General Adams fell seriously hurt, and the brigades were eventually forced back to and across the road, leaving General Adams on the field. A separate attack was then made by Cleburne's division, the brigades of Polk and Wood assaulting the breast-works held by the division
t orders you to proceed down the road towards the enemy's right, and with your artillery endeavor to enfilade his line, with celerity. By order of Lieutenant-General Longstreet. Thomas Claiborne, Lieutenant-Colonel Cavalry. Then our foot-scouts reported that there was nothing on the road taken by the enemy's retreating columns but squads of footmen. Another written order for the cavalry was despatched at 5.30. Rebellion Record. General Preston reinforced us by his brigade under Gracie, pushed beyond our battle, and gained a height and intervening dell before Snodgrass Hill, but the enemy's reserve was on the hill, and full of fight, even to the aggressive. We were pushed back through the valley and up the slope, until General Preston succeeded in getting his brigade under Trigg to the support. Our battery got up at last under Major Williams and opened its destructive fire from eleven guns, which presently convinced General Thomas that his position was no longer tenable
Thomas Claiborne (search for this): chapter 31
ards the noise, and passed by the front of Forrest's cavalry and the front of our right wing, but no report of his march was sent us. Day was on the wane. Night was advancing. The sun dipped to the palisades of Lookout Mountain, when Lieutenant-Colonel Claiborne reported that the cavalry was not riding in response to my calls. He was asked to repeat the order in writing, and despatched as follows: Battle-Field, September 20, 1863, 5.09 P. M. General Wheeler: Lieutenant-General Longstreet orders you to proceed down the road towards the enemy's right, and with your artillery endeavor to enfilade his line, with celerity. By order of Lieutenant-General Longstreet. Thomas Claiborne, Lieutenant-Colonel Cavalry. Then our foot-scouts reported that there was nothing on the road taken by the enemy's retreating columns but squads of footmen. Another written order for the cavalry was despatched at 5.30. Rebellion Record. General Preston reinforced us by his brigade under Grac
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 31
ay behind defences Hood's brigades surged through the forest against the covered infantry and artillery Hood wounded Longstreet suggests a plan for progressive action halting tactics at high tide of success the Confederate left fought a separaterder in writing, and despatched as follows: Battle-Field, September 20, 1863, 5.09 P. M. General Wheeler: Lieutenant-General Longstreet orders you to proceed down the road towards the enemy's right, and with your artillery endeavor to enfilade his line, with celerity. By order of Lieutenant-General Longstreet. Thomas Claiborne, Lieutenant-Colonel Cavalry. Then our foot-scouts reported that there was nothing on the road taken by the enemy's retreating columns but squads of footmthat each lost ten per cent. more men at Chickamauga, and many Confederate regiments whose mortality exceeded this. Longstreet's command in less than two hours lost nearly forty-four per cent. of its strength, and of the troops opposed to a porti
e dews of twilight hung heavy about the trees as if to hold down the voice of victory; but the two lines nearing as they advanced joined their continuous shouts in increasing volume, not as the burstings from the cannon's mouth, but in a tremendous swell of heroic harmony that seemed almost to lift from their roots the great trees of the forest. Before greetings and congratulations upon the success had passed it was night, and the mild beams of the quartering moon were more suggestive of Venus than of Mars. The haversacks and ammunition supplies were ordered replenished, and the Confederate army made its bivouac on the ground it had gained in the first pronounced victory in the West, and one of the most stubbornly contested battles of the war. Our cavalry had failed to close McFarland Gap, and through that General Thomas made his march for the stand at Rossville Gap. It has been stated that this retreat was made under the orders of the Union commander. General Thomas did
B. R. Johnson (search for this): chapter 31
that we had broken and carried the first line; that Johnson's division, on his left, was then in the breach andful confidence. As we approached a second line, Johnson's division happened to strike it while in the act oight readily drew Hood's brigades to that bearing. Johnson's and Hindman's divisions were called to a similar hand, and bring them around to close connection on Johnson's left. On the most open parts of the Confederaman gathered his forces and marched for the left of Johnson's division, and Preston's brigade under General Tri of one of our batteries of the right wing. General Johnson thought that he had the key of the battle near ley road. He was informed of orders given General Johnson for my left, and General Buckner for a battery on tve use of it in supporting us. After his lunch, General Johnson was ordered to make ready his own and Hindman'she battery not opening as promptly as expected, General Johnson was finally ordered into strong, steady battle
und his commander at that point seeking the enemy in his immediate front, and commended the officer upon his vigilance,--twelve hours after the retreat of the enemy's forces. The forces engaged and their respective casualties follow: General Bragg's returns of the 20th of August-the last of record-reported his aggregate of all arms43,866 Reinforced from J. E. Johnston's army in August9,000 Reinforced from J. E. Johnston's army in September (Gregg and McNair´╝ë2,500 Reinforced from General Lee's army, September 18 and 19 (a large estimate)5,000 Total60,366 Losses on the 18th and 19th1,124 Aggregate for battle on the 20th59,242 General Rosecrans's return of September 20, 1863, showed: Aggregate of infantry, equipped46,561 Aggregate of cavalry, equipped10,114 Aggregate of artillery, equipped4,192 Total60,867 Confederate losses (estimated; returns imperfect)17,800 Union losses by returns (infantry, artillery, and cavalry)16,550 The exceeding heaviness of these losses
Julius W. Adams (search for this): chapter 31
on the Federals in the early morning of September 20 repeated and determined front assaults brigadiers Helm killed and Adams wounded the Union commands lay behind defences Hood's brigades surged through the forest against the covered infantry anridge's and Cleburne's divisions, Breckenridge on the right, overreached the enemy's left by two brigades, Stovall's and Adams's, but the other brigade, Helm's, was marched through the wood into front assault of the enemy behind his field-works. Tred Dodge's brigade and parts of Willick's, Berry's, and Stanley's, and superior artillery. In the severe contention General Adams fell seriously hurt, and the brigades were eventually forced back to and across the road, leaving General Adams on thGeneral Adams on the field. A separate attack was then made by Cleburne's division, the brigades of Polk and Wood assaulting the breast-works held by the divisions of Johnson and Palmer. These brigades, after severe fight, were repulsed, and their positions were
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