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John T. Morgan (search for this): chapter 34
thirty-three wounded. As a diversion in favor of the assaulting columns, our troops on the south side were ordered to a simultaneous attack, and to get in on that side if the opportunity occurred. They were reinforced by Russell's brigade of Morgan's division of cavalry, and Harrison's brigade of Armstrong's division, dismounted, General Morgan commanding. This demonstration had the effect anticipated in detaining troops to hold on that side that were intended as reserve for the fort. General Morgan commanding. This demonstration had the effect anticipated in detaining troops to hold on that side that were intended as reserve for the fort. Just after the troops were ordered back it occurred to me that there must be some mistake about the wire network, for some of our men had been seen mounting and passing over the parapets, but it was too late to reorganize and renew the attack, and I conceived that some of the regimental pioneers should have been at hand prepared to cut the wires, but all had been armed to help swell our ranks. Since reading the accounts of General Poe, the engineer in charge of the works, I am convinced that
G. T. Anderson (search for this): chapter 34
enkins's division were to follow in echelon on the left of McLaws's column, G. T. Anderson's, of his right, leading at two hundred yards' interval from McLaws's, Anderson to assault the line in his front, and upon entering to wheel to his left and sweep up that line, followed by Jenkins's and Benning's brigades; but, in case of delay in McLaws's assault, Anderson was to wheel to his right and take the fort through its rear opening, leaving the brigades of Jenkins and Benning to follow the other move to their left. The ditch and parapets about the fort were objects of careful observation from the moment of placing our lines, and opinions coincided withus in the field in practical experience, so that I had confidence in his judgment. Recall was promptly sent General Jenkins and his advance brigade under General Anderson, but the latter, seeing the delay at the fort, changed his direction outside the enemy's works and marched along their front to the ditch, and was there some
ans recently recruited. The positions on the south (or east) side of the river were occupied by Cameron's brigade of Hascall's division and Shackelford's cavalry (dismounted), Reilly's brigade in reserve,--two sections of Wilder's battery and Konkle's battery of four three-inch rifle guns. The batteries of the enemy's front before the city were Romer's four three-inch rifles at the university, Benjamin's four twenty-pound Parrotts and Beecher's six twelve-pound Napoleons (at the fort), Gittings's four ten-pound Parrotts, Fifteenth Indiana Battery of six rifle guns (three-inch), James's (Indiana) Battery of six rifle guns, Henshaw's battery of two (James's) rifle guns and four six-pounders, Shields's battery of six twelve-pound Napoleons, and one section of Wilder's three-inch rifle guns, extending the line from the fort to the river on the north. In his official account, General Burnside reported about twelve thousand effective men, exclusive of the recruits and loyal Tennesse
John G. Walker (search for this): chapter 34
ction of Cumberland Gap. General Martin was sent to reinforce General Jones, with orders to hurry his operations, and return in time to cover anticipated movements. His brigades which had done their clever work on the south side were withdrawn to go with him. When he came up with Jones, the latter was severely engaged, but it was then night, too late for other operations. Their arrangements were made during the night and battle renewed at early dawn and severely contested, the Union troops giving from point to point until they crossed the ford at Walker's and were beyond further threatening. They lost some fifty killed and wounded and one company captured at Colonel Graham's camp. Generals Martin and Jones joined us in good season after their affair of the morning. Their loss was slight, but not detailed in separate reports. Confederate loss in the assault822 Union loss in the assault673 Confederate losses during the campaign1296 Union losses during the campaign1481
Bushrod R. Johnson (search for this): chapter 34
e announced the enemy still in front of him, but not engaging his forces. On the 25th I had a telegram from General Bushrod R. Johnson at Loudon, who was marching with two brigades to reinforce us, saying that the enemy was throwing his cavalry f day (28th) General W. E. Jones, of that command, reported with his cavalry. The brigades from Chattanooga under General B. R. Johnson were at hand, but not yet up. The artillery and infantry coming from Virginia were five or six days march from usd along the fort, so as to prevent the use of the cannon, and distract, if not prevent, the fire of all arms. General B. R. Johnson was in time to follow the main attack by General McLaws with his own and Gracie's brigades (two thousand six hund and formed regularly along the outside of the works around the ditch. I rode after them with the brigades under General B. R. Johnson until within five hundred yards of the fort, whence we could see our advance through the gray of the morning. A
eft to right,--the Ninth Corps, General R. D. Potter commanding. General Ferrero's division extended from the river to Second Creek; General Hartranft's along part of the line between Second and First Creeks; Chapin's and Reilly's brigades over Temperance Hill to near Bell's house, and the brigades of Hoskins and Casement to the river. The interior line was held by regiments of loyal Tennesseeans recently recruited. The positions on the south (or east) side of the river were occupied by Cameron's brigade of Hascall's division and Shackelford's cavalry (dismounted), Reilly's brigade in reserve,--two sections of Wilder's battery and Konkle's battery of four three-inch rifle guns. The batteries of the enemy's front before the city were Romer's four three-inch rifles at the university, Benjamin's four twenty-pound Parrotts and Beecher's six twelve-pound Napoleons (at the fort), Gittings's four ten-pound Parrotts, Fifteenth Indiana Battery of six rifle guns (three-inch), James's (I
Ambrose E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 34
-pound Napoleons, and one section of Wilder's three-inch rifle guns, extending the line from the fort to the river on the north. In his official account, General Burnside reported about twelve thousand effective men, exclusive of the recruits and loyal Tennesseeans. He had fifty-one guns of position, including eight on the soom the fort the ground sloped in a heavy grade, from which the trees had been cut and used as abatis, and wire net-work was stretched between the stumps. General Burnside reported,-- Many citizens and persons who had been driven in by the enemy volunteered to work on the trenches and did good service, while those who were not ives of his soldiers, but better than to look for ways to shift the responsibility of a wavering spirit that sometimes comes unawares. After the repulse, General Burnside was so considerate as to offer a flag of truce for time to remove our killed and wounded about his lines. About half an hour after the repulse, and while
Frank Armstrong (search for this): chapter 34
ks and marched along their front to the ditch, and was there some little time before he received the order. In his march and countermarch in front of the enemy's line he lost four killed and thirty-three wounded. As a diversion in favor of the assaulting columns, our troops on the south side were ordered to a simultaneous attack, and to get in on that side if the opportunity occurred. They were reinforced by Russell's brigade of Morgan's division of cavalry, and Harrison's brigade of Armstrong's division, dismounted, General Morgan commanding. This demonstration had the effect anticipated in detaining troops to hold on that side that were intended as reserve for the fort. Just after the troops were ordered back it occurred to me that there must be some mistake about the wire network, for some of our men had been seen mounting and passing over the parapets, but it was too late to reorganize and renew the attack, and I conceived that some of the regimental pioneers should hav
d Shackelford's cavalry (dismounted), Reilly's brigade in reserve,--two sections of Wilder's battery and Konkle's battery of four three-inch rifle guns. The batteries of the enemy's front before the city were Romer's four three-inch rifles at the university, Benjamin's four twenty-pound Parrotts and Beecher's six twelve-pound Napoleons (at the fort), Gittings's four ten-pound Parrotts, Fifteenth Indiana Battery of six rifle guns (three-inch), James's (Indiana) Battery of six rifle guns, Henshaw's battery of two (James's) rifle guns and four six-pounders, Shields's battery of six twelve-pound Napoleons, and one section of Wilder's three-inch rifle guns, extending the line from the fort to the river on the north. In his official account, General Burnside reported about twelve thousand effective men, exclusive of the recruits and loyal Tennesseeans. He had fifty-one guns of position, including eight on the southeast side. Fort Loudon, afterwards called for the gallant Sander
uld be made against the northwest angle of Fort Loudon or Sanders. Fifth. The men should be urged to the work with a determination to succeed, and should rush to it without hallooing. Sixth. The sharp-shooters to keep up a continuous fire into the embrasures of the enemy's works and along the fort, so as to prevent the use of the cannon, and distract, if not prevent, the fire of all arms. General B. R. Johnson was in time to follow the main attack by General McLaws with his own and Gracie's brigades (two thousand six hundred and twenty-five effectives). The order was given for the 28th, but the weather became so heavy and murky as to hide the fort from view of our artillery, so operations were put off until the 29th. On the 28th reports were brought of an advance of Union troops from the direction of Cumberland Gap. The cavalry under General W. E. Jones was sent to arrest their march pending operations ordered for the 29th, and he was authorized to call the artiller
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