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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
llowing the fall of Fort Sumter, the navy of the United States was in no condition to enforce the blockade fromthe usual show of force, and brought them to the United States, but allowed the Trent to proceed on her voyage.roduced as great excitement in England as in the United States, and the British government began instant and sie whether her Majesty's government will hear the United States upon the matter in question. The President desid have considered, the existing rebellion in the United States; the position Great Britain has assumed, includi seizure is the subject of complaint bore to the United States, and the object of their voyage at the time theymaster of the Trent had of their relation to the United States, and of the object of their voyage, at the time in analogous cases between Great Britain and the United States. Upon a submission containing the foregoing al, I am instructed to say the government of the United States will, if agreed to by her Majesty's government,
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
bitration Seward's despatch McClellan at Washington army of the Potomac McClellan's quarrel sent to Lord Lyons, the British minister at Washington, to demand the release of the prisoners and sful campaign in West Virginia was called to Washington and placed in command of the Division of thewhich comprised all the troops in and around Washington, on both sides of the river. Called thus tougust 9, just two weeks after his arrival in Washington, he wrote: , I would cheerfully take the dichis wife just two weeks after his arrival in Washington, never again left him so long as he continueudden bound from Manassas seized the city of Washington. He immediately began a quarrel with Generahe whole military strength of the country at Washington to fight the one great battle for which he centative Horace Maynard telegraphed him from Washington: Our people are oppressed and pursuedelf as general-in-chief; but when he reached Washington the autumn was already late, and because of
Columbus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
e iteration it degenerated from an expression of deep disappointment to a note of sarcastic criticism. While so unsatisfactory a condition of affairs existed in the first great military field east of the Alleghanies, the outlook was quite as unpromising both in the second-between the Alleghanies and the Mississippi --and in the third-west of the Mississippi. When the Confederates, about September I, 1861, invaded Kentucky, they stationed General Pillow at the strongly fortified town of Columbus on the Mississippi River, with about six thousand men; General Buckner at Bowling Green, on the railroad north of Nashville, with five thousand; and General Zollicoffer, with six regiments, in eastern Kentucky, fronting Cumberland Gap. Up to that time there were no Union troops in Kentucky, except a few regiments of Home Guards. Now, however, the State legislature called for active help; and General Anderson, exercising nominal command from Cincinnati, sent Brigadier-General Sherman to Na
meron's visit to Sherman East Tennessee instructions to Buell Buell's neglect Halleck in Missouri Following the fBuell's neglect Halleck in Missouri Following the fall of Fort Sumter, the navy of the United States was in no condition to enforce the blockade from Chesapeake Bay to the Rio burden that he soon asked to be relieved; and when Brigadier-General Buell was sent to succeed him in command of that part ofay anticipate by recalling that in the following summer General Buell spent as much time, money, and military strength in hisat object was specially enjoined in the instructions to General Buell when he was sent to command in Kentucky. It so happwithin the same month McClellan repeated this injunction to Buell with additional emphasis. Senator Andrew Johnson and Repref the forest; the government must come to their relief. Buell replied, keeping the word of promise to the ear, but, with ve command to advance on eastern Tennessee at once. Again Buell promised compliance, only, however, again to report in a fe
Beauregard (search for this): chapter 18
am that he was to be the sole savior of his country, announced confidentially to his wife just two weeks after his arrival in Washington, never again left him so long as he continued in command. Coupled with this dazzling vision, however, was soon developed the tormenting twofold hallucination: first, that everybody was conspiring to thwart him; and, second, that the enemy had from double to quadruple numbers to defeat him. For the first month he could not sleep for the nightmare that Beauregard's demoralized army had by a sudden bound from Manassas seized the city of Washington. He immediately began a quarrel with General Scott, which, by the first of November, drove the old hero into retirement and out of his pathway. The cabinet members who, wittingly or unwittingly, had encouraged him in this he some weeks later stigmatized as a set of geese. Seeing that President Lincoln was kind and unassuming in discussing military questions, McClellan quickly contracted the habit of ex
J. M. Mason (search for this): chapter 18
s. Further reconnaissance proved that the panic extended itself over the whole network of sea islands between Charleston and Savannah, permitting the immediate occupation of the entire region, and affording a military base for both the navy and the army of incalculable advantage in the further reduction of the coast. Another naval exploit, however, almost at the same time, absorbed greater public attention, and for a while created an intense degree of excitement and suspense. Ex-Senators J. M. Mason and John Slidell, having been accredited by the Confederate government as envoys to European courts, had managed to elude the blockade and reach Havana. Captain Charles Wilkes, commanding the San Jacinto, learning that they were to take passage for England on the British mail steamer Trent, intercepted that vessel on November 8 near the coast of Cuba, took the rebel emissaries prisoner by the usual show of force, and brought them to the United States, but allowed the Trent to proce
Robert Anderson (search for this): chapter 18
l Zollicoffer, with six regiments, in eastern Kentucky, fronting Cumberland Gap. Up to that time there were no Union troops in Kentucky, except a few regiments of Home Guards. Now, however, the State legislature called for active help; and General Anderson, exercising nominal command from Cincinnati, sent Brigadier-General Sherman to Nashville to confront Buckner, and Brigadier-General Thomas to Camp Dick Robinson, to confront Zollicoffer. Neither side was as yet in a condition of force and preparation to take the aggressive. When, a month later, Anderson, on account of ill health turned over the command to Sherman, the latter had gathered only about eighteen thousand men, and was greatly discouraged by the task of defending three hundred miles of frontier with that small force. In an interview with Secretary of War Cameron, who called upon him on his return from Fremont's camp, about the middle of October, he strongly urged that he needed for immediate defense sixty thousand,
ern newspapers in Northern homes, until by mere iteration it degenerated from an expression of deep disappointment to a note of sarcastic criticism. While so unsatisfactory a condition of affairs existed in the first great military field east of the Alleghanies, the outlook was quite as unpromising both in the second-between the Alleghanies and the Mississippi --and in the third-west of the Mississippi. When the Confederates, about September I, 1861, invaded Kentucky, they stationed General Pillow at the strongly fortified town of Columbus on the Mississippi River, with about six thousand men; General Buckner at Bowling Green, on the railroad north of Nashville, with five thousand; and General Zollicoffer, with six regiments, in eastern Kentucky, fronting Cumberland Gap. Up to that time there were no Union troops in Kentucky, except a few regiments of Home Guards. Now, however, the State legislature called for active help; and General Anderson, exercising nominal command from Ci
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 18
Corinth to East Tennessee as would have amply sufficed to build the line from Lexington to Knoxville recommended by Mr. Lincoln--the general's effort resulting only in his being driven back to Louisville; that in 1863, Burnside, under greater difficulties, made the march and successfully held Knoxville, even without a railroad, which Thomas with a few regiments could have accomplished in 1861; and that in the final collapse of the rebellion, in the spring of 1865, the beaten armies of both Johnston and Lee attempted to retreat for a last stand to this same mountain region which Mr. Lincoln pointed out in December, 1861. Though the President received no encouragement from senators and representatives in his plan to take possession of East Tennessee, that object was specially enjoined in the instructions to General Buell when he was sent to command in Kentucky. It so happens that a large majority of the inhabitants of eastern Tennessee are in favor of the Union; it therefore se
Horace Maynard (search for this): chapter 18
Louisville to Nashville, while you throw the mass of your forces by rapid marches by Cumberland Gap or Walker's Gap on Knoxville, in order to occupy the railroad at that point, and thus enable the loyal citizens of eastern Tennessee to rise, while you at the same time cut off the railway communication between eastern Virginia and the Mississippi. Three times within the same month McClellan repeated this injunction to Buell with additional emphasis. Senator Andrew Johnson and Representative Horace Maynard telegraphed him from Washington: Our people are oppressed and pursued as beasts of the forest; the government must come to their relief. Buell replied, keeping the word of promise to the ear, but, with his ambition fixed on a different campaign, gradually but doggedly broke it to the hope. When, a month later, he acknowledged that his preparations and intent were to move against Nashville, the President wrote him: Of the two, I would rather have a point on the
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