hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Abraham Lincoln 914 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 317 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 293 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 253 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 236 0 Browse Search
John Sherman 196 0 Browse Search
Illinois (Illinois, United States) 182 0 Browse Search
Stephen A. Douglas 180 0 Browse Search
Henry W. Halleck 175 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History. Search the whole document.

Found 464 total hits in 99 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Simon Cameron (search for this): chapter 18
an's quarrel with Scott retirement of Scott Lincoln's memorandum-all quiet on the Potomac conditions in Kentucky Cameron's visit to Sherman East Tennessee instructions to Buell Buell's neglect Halleck in Missouri Following the fascouraged by the task of defending three hundred miles of frontier with that small force. In an interview with Secretary of War Cameron, who called upon him on his return from Fremont's camp, about the middle of October, he strongly urged that he nediate defense sixty thousand, and for ultimate offense two hundred thousand before we were done. Great God! exclaimed Cameron, where are they to come from? Both Sherman's demand and Cameron's answer were a pertinent comment on McClellan's policyCameron's answer were a pertinent comment on McClellan's policy of collecting the whole military strength of the country at Washington to fight the one great battle for which he could never get ready. Sherman was so distressed by the seeming magnitude of his burden that he soon asked to be relieved; and whe
John Sherman (search for this): chapter 18
t Lincoln's memorandum-all quiet on the Potomac conditions in Kentucky Cameron's visit to Sherman East Tennessee instructions to Buell Buell's neglect Halleck in Missouri Following or active help; and General Anderson, exercising nominal command from Cincinnati, sent Brigadier-General Sherman to Nashville to confront Buckner, and Brigadier-General Thomas to Camp Dick Robinson, aggressive. When, a month later, Anderson, on account of ill health turned over the command to Sherman, the latter had gathered only about eighteen thousand men, and was greatly discouraged by the thousand before we were done. Great God! exclaimed Cameron, where are they to come from? Both Sherman's demand and Cameron's answer were a pertinent comment on McClellan's policy of collecting the the country at Washington to fight the one great battle for which he could never get ready. Sherman was so distressed by the seeming magnitude of his burden that he soon asked to be relieved; and
December 3rd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 18
riotic stronghold. Had his advice been followed, it would have completely severed railroad communication, by way of the Shenandoah valley, Knoxville, and Chattanooga, between Virginia and the Gulf States, accomplishing in the winter of 1861 what was not attained until two years later. Mr. Lincoln urged this in a second memorandum, made late in September; and seeing that the principal objection to it lay in the long and difficult line of land transportation, his message to Congress of December 3, 1861, recommended, as a military measure, the construction of a railroad to connect Cincinnati, by way of Lexington, Kentucky, with that mountain region. A few days after the message, he personally went to the President's room in the Capitol building, and calling around him a number of leading senators and representatives, and pointing out on a map before them the East Tennessee region, said to them in substance: I am thoroughly convinced that the closing struggle of the war will occ
August 9th (search for this): chapter 18
days later: They give me my way in everything, full swing and unbounded confidence . . W. ho would have thought, when we were married, that I should so soon be called upon to save my country? And still a few days afterward: I shall carry this thing en grande, and crush the rebels in one campaign. From the giddy elevation to which such an imaginary achievement raised his dreams, there was but one higher step, and his colossal egotism immediately mounted to occupy it. On August 9, just two weeks after his arrival in Washington, he wrote: , I would cheerfully take the dictatorship and agree to lay down my life when the country is saved ; while in the same letter he adds, with the most naive unconsciousness of his hallucination: I am not spoiled by my unexpected new position. Coming to the national capital in the hour of deepest public depression over the Bull Run defeat, Mc-Clellan was welcomed by the President, the cabinet, and General Scott with sincere friendsh
November 1st (search for this): chapter 18
defeat him. For the first month he could not sleep for the nightmare that Beauregard's demoralized army had by a sudden bound from Manassas seized the city of Washington. He immediately began a quarrel with General Scott, which, by the first of November, drove the old hero into retirement and out of his pathway. The cabinet members who, wittingly or unwittingly, had encouraged him in this he some weeks later stigmatized as a set of geese. Seeing that President Lincoln was kind and unass the Potomac held the fate of the country in its hands; that the advance should not be postponed beyond November 25; and that a single will should direct the plan of accomplishing a crushing defeat of the rebel army at Manassas. On the first of November the President, yielding at last to General Scott's urgent solicitation, issued the orders placing him on the retired list, and in his stead appointing General McClellan to the command of all the armies. The administration indulged the expe
September 8th (search for this): chapter 18
placed himself in a similar attitude respecting their inquiry and advice. McClellan's activity and judgment as an army organizer naturally created great hopes that he would be equally efficient as a commander in the field. But these hopes were grievously disappointed. To his first great defect of estimating himself as the sole savior of the country, must at once be added the second, of his utter inability to form any reasonable judgment of the strength of the enemy in his front. On September 8, when the Confederate army at Manassas numbered forty-one thousand, he rated it at one hundred and thirty thousand. By the end of October that estimate had risen to one hundred and fifty thousand, to meet which he asked that his own force should be raised to an aggregate of two hundred and forty thousand, with a total of effectives of two hundred and eight thousand, and four hundred and eighty-eight guns. He suggested that to gather this force all other points should be left on the defe
April 19th (search for this): chapter 18
Seward's despatch McClellan at Washington army of the Potomac McClellan's quarrel with Scott retirement of Scott Lincoln's memorandum-all quiet on the Potomac conditions in Kentucky Cameron's visit to Sherman East Tennessee instructions to Buell Buell's neglect Halleck in Missouri Following the fall of Fort Sumter, the navy of the United States was in no condition to enforce the blockade from Chesapeake Bay to the Rio Grande declared by Lincoln's proclamation of April 19. Of the forty-two vessels then in commission nearly all were on foreign stations. Another serious cause of weakness was that within a few days after the Sumter attack one hundred and twenty-four officers of the navy resigned, or were dismissed for disloyalty, and the number of such was doubled before the fourth of July. Yet by the strenuous efforts of the department in fitting out ships that had been laid up, in completing those under construction, and in extensive purchases and arming o
unwillingness of a commander to obey instructions. To say nothing of the strategical value of East Tennessee to the Union, the fidelity of its people is shown in the reports sent to the Confederate government that the whole country is now in a state of rebellion ; that civil war has broken out in East Tennessee ; and that they look for the reestablishment of the Federal authority in the South with as much confidence as the Jews look for the coming of the Messiah. Henry W. Halleck, born in 1815, graduated from West Point in 1839, who, after distinguished service in the Mexican war, had been brevetted captain of Engineers, but soon afterward resigned from the army to pursue the practice of law in San Francisco, was, perhaps, the best professionally equipped officer among the number of those called by General Scott in the summer of 1861 to assume important command in the Union army. It is probable that Scott intended he should succeed himself as general-in-chief; but when he reached
December, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 18
Lincoln--the general's effort resulting only in his being driven back to Louisville; that in 1863, Burnside, under greater difficulties, made the march and successfully held Knoxville, even without a railroad, which Thomas with a few regiments could have accomplished in 1861; and that in the final collapse of the rebellion, in the spring of 1865, the beaten armies of both Johnston and Lee attempted to retreat for a last stand to this same mountain region which Mr. Lincoln pointed out in December, 1861. Though the President received no encouragement from senators and representatives in his plan to take possession of East Tennessee, that object was specially enjoined in the instructions to General Buell when he was sent to command in Kentucky. It so happens that a large majority of the inhabitants of eastern Tennessee are in favor of the Union; it therefore seems proper that you should remain on the defensive on the line from Louisville to Nashville, while you throw the mass of
November 5th (search for this): chapter 18
the Ohio River, and from those lying east of the Mississippi River. Yielding to our superior force, they will gradually retreat to the more defensible mountain districts, and make their final stand in that part of the South where the seven States of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and West Virginia come together. The population there is overwhelmingly and devotedly loyal to the Union. The despatches from Brigadier-General Thomas of October 28 and November 5 show that, with four additional good regiments, he is willing to undertake the campaign and is confident he can take immediate possession. Once established, the people will rally to his support, and by building a railroad, over which to forward him regular supplies and needed reinforcements from time to time, we can hold it against all attempts to dislodge us, and at the same time menace the enemy in any one of the States I have named. While his hearers listened with interest, it was
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10