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Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
to cooperate as far as possible with Sherman's advance, and to afford him a new base of supply, if, at some suitable point he should desire to establish communications with it. When, in the middle of January, 1865, a naval expedition captured Fort Fisher at the mouth of Cape Fear River, an army corps under General Schofield was brought east from Thomas's Army of the Tennessee, and sent by sea to the North Carolina coast to penetrate into the interior and form a junction with Sherman when he she careful investigation by the mixed commission on American and British claims, under the treaty of Washington. Still pursuing his march, Sherman arrived at Cheraw March 3, and opened communication with General Terry, who had advanced from Fort Fisher to Wilmington. Hitherto, his advance had been practically unopposed. But now he learned that General Johnston had once more been placed in command of the Confederate forces, and was collecting an army near Raleigh, North Carolina. Well know
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
Sherman Sherman's March through the Carolinas the burning of Charleston and Columbia arrival at Goldsboro Junction with Schofield with which General Hardee had evacuated Savannah and retreated to Charleston could, of course, oppose no serious opposition to Sherman's marchthe capital of South Carolina, on February 16, Hardee evacuated. Charleston, which had been defended for four long years against every attacksault had failed to wrest Fort Wagner from the enemy. But though Charleston fell without a battle, and was occupied by the Union troops on tho prevent it falling into Union hands; and the supply gathered in Charleston to be sent abroad by blockade runners, having been set on fire bye or thirty thousand men, of which the troops Hardee brought from Charleston formed the nucleus; and the two minor engagements on March 16 an of Savannah, his progress through the Carolinas, and the fall of Charleston, formed an aggregate expedition covering nearly a thousand miles,
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
Hood's invasion of Tennessee Franklin and Nashville Sherman's March to the sea capture of Savannah Sherman to Lincoln Lincoln to Sherman Sherman's March through the Carolinas the burning of Charleston and Columbia arrival at Goldsboro Junction with Schofield visit to Grant While Grant was making his marches, fighting his battles, and carrying on his siege operations in Virginia, Sherman in the West was performing the task assigned to him by his chief, to pursue, destt Johnston was able to gather a force of only twenty-five or thirty thousand men, of which the troops Hardee brought from Charleston formed the nucleus; and the two minor engagements on March 16 and 19 did little to impede Sherman's advance to Goldsboro, where he arrived on March 23, forming a junction with the Union army sent by sea under Schofield, that had reached the same point the previous day. The third giant stride of Sherman's great campaign was thus happily accomplished. His capt
Tuscumbia (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
o Atlanta, and cutting entirely loose from his base of supplies, march with the remainder to the sea; living upon the country, and making the interior of Georgia feel the weight of war. Grant did not immediately fall in with Sherman's suggestion; and Sherman prudently waited until the Confederate plan of invading Tennessee became further developed. It turned out as he hoped and expected. Having gradually ceased his raids upon the railroad, Hood, by the end of October, moved westward to Tuscumbia on the Tennessee River, where he gathered an army of about thirty-five thousand, to which a cavalry force under Forrest of ten thousand more was soon added. Under Beauregard's orders to assume the offensive, he began a rapid march northward, and for a time with a promise of cutting off some advanced Union detachments. We need not follow the fortunes of this campaign further than to state that the Confederate invasion of Tennessee ended in disastrous failure. It was severely checked a
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
Franklin and Nashville Sherman's March to the sea capture of Savannah Sherman to Lincoln Lincoln to Sherman Sherman's March throulfully between and past them. He reached the outer defenses of Savannah on December 10, easily driving before him about ten thousand of th22: I beg to present to you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah, with one hundred and fifty heavy guns and plenty of ammunition. Sherman: Many, many thanks for your Christmas gift, the capture of Savannah. When you were about leaving Atlanta for the Atlantic coast I was same process, by marching his army through the heart of them from Savannah to Raleigh. The game is then up with Lee, he confidently addedteen thousand Confederates with which General Hardee had evacuated Savannah and retreated to Charleston could, of course, oppose no serious opshed. His capture of Atlanta, his march to the sea and capture of Savannah, his progress through the Carolinas, and the fall of Charleston, f
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
Sherman's Meridian expedition capture of Atlanta Hood Supersedes Johnston Hood's invasion before him clearly-indicated the city of Atlanta, Georgia, as his first objective, and as his neces the middle of July he was in the vicinity of Atlanta, having during his advance made only one serilf fully occupied in guarding the defenses of Atlanta. For some weeks each army tried ineffectual 3, Sherman telegraphed to Washington: Atlanta is ours, and fairly won ... Since May 5 we ha or skirmish, and need rest. The fall of Atlanta was a heavy blow to the Confederates. They hstern and western armies. But the capture of Atlanta instantly infused new zeal and confidence amoiends and people. Up to his occupation of Atlanta, Sherman's further plans had neither been arrhe whole line of railroad from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and cutting entirely loose from his base ofg westward on his campaign of invasion. From Atlanta, he sent back his sick and wounded and surplu[6 more...]
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ea to unite with the Army of the Potomac before Petersburg. Greatly to Sherman's satisfaction, this order was soon revoked, and he was informed that Grant wished the whole matter of your future actions should be left entirely to your own discretion. In Sherman's mind, the next steps to be taken were as clear as daylight. The progress of the war in the West could now be described step by step, and its condition and probable course be estimated with sound judgment. The opening of the Mississippi River in the previous year had cut off from the rebellion the vast resources west of the great river. Sherman's Meridian campaign in February had rendered useless the railroads of the State of Mississippi. The capture of Atlanta and the march to the sea had ruined the railroads of Georgia, cutting off another huge slice of Confederate resources. The battles of Franklin and Nashville had practically annihilated the principal Confederate army in the West. Sherman now proposed to Grant tha
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ed them to expect a change from a defensive to an aggressive campaign. Responding to this expectation, Hood almost immediately took the offensive, and made vigorous attacks on the Union positions, but met disastrous repulse, and found himself fully occupied in guarding the defenses of Atlanta. For some weeks each army tried ineffectual methods to seize the other's railroad communications. But toward the end of August, Sherman's flank movements gained such a hold of the Macon railroad at Jonesboro, twenty-five miles south of Atlanta, as to endanger Hood's security; and when, in addition, a detachment sent to dislodge Sherman was defeated, Hood had no alternative but to order an evacuation. On September 3, Sherman telegraphed to Washington: Atlanta is ours, and fairly won ... Since May 5 we have been in one constant battle or skirmish, and need rest. The fall of Atlanta was a heavy blow to the Confederates. They had, during the war, transformed it into a city of mills,
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
to Grant While Grant was making his marches, fighting his battles, and carrying on his siege operations in Virginia, Sherman in the West was performing the task assigned to him by his chief, to pursue, destroy, or capture the principal western Confederate army, now commanded by General Johnston. The forces which under Bragg had been defeated in the previous autumn at Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, had halted as soon as pursuit ceased, and remained in winter quarters at and about Dalton, only twenty-eight or thirty miles on the railroad southeast of Chattanooga, where their new commander, Johnston, had, in the spring of 1864, about sixty-eight thousand men with which to oppose the Union advance. A few preliminary campaigns and expeditions in the West need not here be detailed, as they were not decisive. One, however, led by Sherman himself from Vicksburg to Meridian, must be mentioned, since, during the month of February, it destroyed about one hundred miles of the sev
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ough the Carolinas the burning of Charleston and Columbia arrival at Goldsboro Junction with Schofield visit to Grant While Grant was making his marches, fighting his battles, and carrying on his siege operations in Virginia, Sherman in the West was performing the task assigned to him by his chief, to pursue, destroy, or capture the principal western Confederate army, now commanded by General Johnston. The forces which under Bragg had been defeated in the previous autumn at Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, had halted as soon as pursuit ceased, and remained in winter quarters at and about Dalton, only twenty-eight or thirty miles on the railroad southeast of Chattanooga, where their new commander, Johnston, had, in the spring of 1864, about sixty-eight thousand men with which to oppose the Union advance. A few preliminary campaigns and expeditions in the West need not here be detailed, as they were not decisive. One, however, led by Sherman himself from Vicksburg
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