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Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 33
his project, which proved to be nothing less than a proposition that the Union and Confederate armies cease fighting each other and unite to drive the French from Mexico. He supported this daring idea in a paper of some length, pointing out that as slavery, the real cause of the war, was hopelessly doomed, nothing now remained toour southern flank, the paper said further, will ally his name with those of Washington and Jackson as a defender of the liberty of the country. If in delivering Mexico he should model its States in form and principle to adapt them to our Union, and add a new southern constellation to its benignant sky While rounding off our possith this, Mr. Blair returned to Richmond, giving Mr. Davis such excuses as he could hastily frame why the ,President had rejected his plan for a joint invasion of Mexico. Jefferson Davis therefore had only two alternatives before him-either to repeat his stubborn ultimatum of separation and independence, or frankly to accept Linc
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 33
eran politician Francis P. Blair, Sr., who, from his long political and personal experience in Washington, knew, perhaps better than almost any one else, the individual characters and tempers of South offered the suggestions he wished to submit in person to Mr. Davis to any one in authority at Washington. After some delay, he found himself in Richmond, and was accorded a confidential interviewburg dynasty from our southern flank, the paper said further, will ally his name with those of Washington and Jackson as a defender of the liberty of the country. If in delivering Mexico he should mony contrivance to help them out of their direful prospects. But the government councils at Washington were not ruled by the spirit of political adventure. Abraham Lincoln had a loftier conceptionhe letter of Mr. Lincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you are requested to proceed to Washington City for informal conference with him upon the issues involved in the existing war, and for the
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
y two alternatives before him-either to repeat his stubborn ultimatum of separation and independence, or frankly to accept Lincoln's ultimatum of reunion. The principal Richmond authorities knew, and some of them admitted, that their Confederacy was nearly in collapse. Lee sent a despatch saying he had not two days rations for his army. Richmond was already in a panic at rumors of evacuation. Flour was selling at a thousand dollars a barrel in Confederate currency. The recent fall of Fort Fisher had closed the last avenue through which blockade-runners could bring in foreign supplies. Governor Brown of Georgia was refusing to obey orders from Richmond, and characterizing them as despotic. Under such circumstances a defiant cry of independence would not reassure anybody; nor, on the other hand, was it longer possible to remain silent. Mr. Blair's first visit had created general interest; when he came a second time, wonder and rumor rose to fever heat. Impelled to take acti
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
pt Lincoln's ultimatum of reunion. The principal Richmond authorities knew, and some of them admitted, that their Confederacy was nearly in collapse. Lee sent a despatch saying he had not two days rations for his army. Richmond was already in a panic at rumors of evacuation. Flour was selling at a thousand dollars a barrel in Confederate currency. The recent fall of Fort Fisher had closed the last avenue through which blockade-runners could bring in foreign supplies. Governor Brown of Georgia was refusing to obey orders from Richmond, and characterizing them as despotic. Under such circumstances a defiant cry of independence would not reassure anybody; nor, on the other hand, was it longer possible to remain silent. Mr. Blair's first visit had created general interest; when he came a second time, wonder and rumor rose to fever heat. Impelled to take action, Mr. Davis had not the courage to be frank. After consultation with his cabinet, a peace commission of three was app
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
me upon it in its final stronghold — the constitutions of the slave States. Local public opinion had throttled it in West Virginia, in Missouri, in Arkansas, in Louisiana, in Maryland, and the same spirit of change was upon Tennessee, and even showing itself in Kentucky. The Democratic party did not, and could not, shut its eyes the loyal States would be sufficient, others that three fourths of all the States, whether loyal or insurrectionary, was necessary. Mr. Lincoln, in a speech on Louisiana reconstruction, while expressing no opinion against the first proposition, nevertheless declared with great argumentative force that the latter would be unquestiates of the Union, had ratified the amendment, and that it had become valid as a part of the Constitution. Four of the States constituting this number-Virginia, Louisiana, Tennessee, and Arkansas were those whose reconstruction had been effected under the direction of President Lincoln. Six more States subsequently ratified the am
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
— to go forward and have consummated by the votes of the States that which Congress had so nobly begun yesterday. He had the honor to inform those present that Illinois had already to-day done the work. Maryland was about half through, but he felt proud that Illinois was a little ahead. He thought this measure was a very fittiIllinois was a little ahead. He thought this measure was a very fitting, if not an indispensable, adjunct to the winding up of the great difficulty. He wished the reunion of all the States perfected, and so effected as to remove all causes of disturbance in the future; and to attain this end it was necessary that the original disturbing cause should, if possible, be rooted out. He thought all woultter would be unquestioned and unquestionable ; and this view appears to have governed the action of his successor. As Mr. Lincoln mentioned with just pride, Illinois was the first State to ratify the amendment. On December 18, 1865, Mr. Seward, who remained as Secretary of State in the cabinet of President Johnson, made offi
Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
thern people to the Latin race. He who expels the Bonaparte-Hapsburg dynasty from our southern flank, the paper said further, will ally his name with those of Washington and Jackson as a defender of the liberty of the country. If in delivering Mexico he should model its States in form and principle to adapt them to our Union, and add a new southern constellation to its benignant sky While rounding off our possessions on the continent at the Isthmus, . . . he would complete the work of Jefferson, who first set one foot of our colossal government on the Pacific by a stride from the Gulf of Mexico. I then said to him, There is my problem, Mr. Davis; do you think it possible to be solved? After consideration, he said: I think so. I then said, You see that I make the great point of this matter that the war is no longer made for slavery, but monarchy. You know that if the war is kept up and the Union kept divided, armies must be kept afoot on both sides, and this state of things
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
, trampled upon by marching Union armies. More notable than all, the agony of dissolution had come upon it in its final stronghold — the constitutions of the slave States. Local public opinion had throttled it in West Virginia, in Missouri, in Arkansas, in Louisiana, in Maryland, and the same spirit of change was upon Tennessee, and even showing itself in Kentucky. The Democratic party did not, and could not, shut its eyes to the accomplished facts. The issue was decided on the afternoon en States, constituting three fourths of the thirty-six States of the Union, had ratified the amendment, and that it had become valid as a part of the Constitution. Four of the States constituting this number-Virginia, Louisiana, Tennessee, and Arkansas were those whose reconstruction had been effected under the direction of President Lincoln. Six more States subsequently ratified the amendment, Texas ending the list in February, 1870. The profound political transformation which the America
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
eace offering, there is little doubt that it would have become a part of the Constitution. But the thunder of Beauregard's guns drove away all possibility of such a ratification, and within four years the Lincoln administration sent forth the amendment of 1865, sweeping out of existence by one sentence the institution to which it had — in its first proposal offered a virtual claim to perpetual recognition and tolerance. The new birth of freedom which Lincoln invoked for the nation in his Gettysburg address, was accomplished. The closing paragraphs of President Lincoln's message to Congress of December 6, 1864, were devoted to a summing up of the existing situation. The verdict of the ballot-box had not only decided the continuance of a war administration and war policy, but renewed the assurance of a public sentiment to sustain its prosecution. Inspired by this majestic manifestation of the popular will, he was able to speak of the future with hope and confidence. But with cha
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 33
flank, the paper said further, will ally his name with those of Washington and Jackson as a defender of the liberty of the country. If in delivering Mexico he should model its States in form and principle to adapt them to our Union, and add a new southern constellation to its benignant sky While rounding off our possessions on the continent at the Isthmus, . . . he would complete the work of Jefferson, who first set one foot of our colossal government on the Pacific by a stride from the Gulf of Mexico. I then said to him, There is my problem, Mr. Davis; do you think it possible to be solved? After consideration, he said: I think so. I then said, You see that I make the great point of this matter that the war is no longer made for slavery, but monarchy. You know that if the war is kept up and the Union kept divided, armies must be kept afoot on both sides, and this state of things has never continued long without resulting in monarchy on one side or the other, and on both genera
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