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ral Stoneman moved eastward to pass around the flank of the rebel army, and General Ed. McCook, at the same time, started to pass around the left. McCook's command numbered about 2,000 men, well mounted and equipped, of which the writer was one. We all knew the nature of the mission on which we were sent, and felt that it was difficult. For it is not easy for two thousand men to go behind a hostile army of sixty thousand, and do any damage, andget back. Early on that bright, hot July morning, the bugle called us into line — an inspection was made, and all lame horses or sick men ordered back to camp. We consoled those who had to stay behind with the promise that we would bring them a plug of tobacco when we came back. When we came back? We shall see. Thus relieved of all that would encumber us, we moved out on the road and started westward. We crossed the Chattahoochee at Sandtown, and passed down on the west side about twenty miles to the vicinity of Campbelltown,
town toward the east. Just east of town we passed a plantation where two or three hundred negroes, of all ages and sexes, were sitting on the fence watching the red glare of the burning village. The light was bright enough to make everything distinct. As we rode by, one old aunty raised her hands toward heaven and cried aloud, Bress de Lord! De jubilee hab come! At about three o'clock A. M., we came upon a large park of army wagons; we were told that there were eight hundred of them. Hood had sent them back there to have them safe. We took the mules, burned the wagons, and turned the drivers loose. At about seven o'clock that morning we struck the Macon railroad near Lovejoy station, where we expected to form a junction with Stoneman, who had started around the other way. We treated this road like we did the other; captured and destroyed a train of cars, and sent out scouts in all directions to feel for Stoneman. Some of our scouts came back to tell us that there
raid to the enemy's rear, to destroy their railroad communication. So, on July 27th, 1864, General Stoneman moved eastward to pass around the flank of the rebel army, and General Ed. McCook, at the sng we struck the Macon railroad near Lovejoy station, where we expected to form a junction with Stoneman, who had started around the other way. We treated this road like we did the other; captured and destroyed a train of cars, and sent out scouts in all directions to feel for Stoneman. Some of our scouts came back to tell us that there was rebel cavalry near us. Some did not come back at all. No word or sign from Stoneman could we get. We feared he was in trouble, or gone up, but we wanted some word. But as evidence multiplied that the Johnnies were thickening around us, we all bve taken us out of the scrape.) But McCook was loth to leave without first learning the fate of Stoneman. About two o'clock P. M. he gave it up. By this time the rebs had surrounded us, and were j
ther way. We treated this road like we did the other; captured and destroyed a train of cars, and sent out scouts in all directions to feel for Stoneman. Some of our scouts came back to tell us that there was rebel cavalry near us. Some did not come back at all. No word or sign from Stoneman could we get. We feared he was in trouble, or gone up, but we wanted some word. But as evidence multiplied that the Johnnies were thickening around us, we all became impatient. Croxton and Brownlow were chafing like caged tigers. They felt that waiting was fatal. (I have always believed that Croxton could have taken us out of the scrape.) But McCook was loth to leave without first learning the fate of Stoneman. About two o'clock P. M. he gave it up. By this time the rebs had surrounded us, and were just waiting to see how we would try to get out. We skirmished with them for an hour, feeling their line on the west and south, and losing five or six men killed. We then massed our
Chapter 1: the raid. Sherman in front of Atlanta. the raid. sleepy guards. pontoon boats. rebel camp Surrenders. in the enemy's land. Palmetto in Ashes. a running fight While Sherman's army lay in front of Atlanta, he determined to send his cavalry on a raid to the enemy's rear, to destroy their railroad communication. So, on July 27th, 1864, General Stoneman moved eastward to pass around the flank of the rebel army, and General Ed. McCook, at the same time, started to Sherman's army lay in front of Atlanta, he determined to send his cavalry on a raid to the enemy's rear, to destroy their railroad communication. So, on July 27th, 1864, General Stoneman moved eastward to pass around the flank of the rebel army, and General Ed. McCook, at the same time, started to pass around the left. McCook's command numbered about 2,000 men, well mounted and equipped, of which the writer was one. We all knew the nature of the mission on which we were sent, and felt that it was difficult. For it is not easy for two thousand men to go behind a hostile army of sixty thousand, and do any damage, andget back. Early on that bright, hot July morning, the bugle called us into line — an inspection was made, and all lame horses or sick men ordered back to camp. W
. Some did not come back at all. No word or sign from Stoneman could we get. We feared he was in trouble, or gone up, but we wanted some word. But as evidence multiplied that the Johnnies were thickening around us, we all became impatient. Croxton and Brownlow were chafing like caged tigers. They felt that waiting was fatal. (I have always believed that Croxton could have taken us out of the scrape.) But McCook was loth to leave without first learning the fate of Stoneman. About twoCroxton could have taken us out of the scrape.) But McCook was loth to leave without first learning the fate of Stoneman. About two o'clock P. M. he gave it up. By this time the rebs had surrounded us, and were just waiting to see how we would try to get out. We skirmished with them for an hour, feeling their line on the west and south, and losing five or six men killed. We then massed our forces, and charging up a ravine, broke their line and fled; and all that afternoon, and the night following, we had a running fight, they crowding our rear the whole time. Whenever they would get too close, one or two companies of
Bress Lord (search for this): chapter 2
was in her midst. The next morning arose upon a blackened ruin. It was the track of war. A little before midnight our work was done, and we swept out of town toward the east. Just east of town we passed a plantation where two or three hundred negroes, of all ages and sexes, were sitting on the fence watching the red glare of the burning village. The light was bright enough to make everything distinct. As we rode by, one old aunty raised her hands toward heaven and cried aloud, Bress de Lord! De jubilee hab come! At about three o'clock A. M., we came upon a large park of army wagons; we were told that there were eight hundred of them. Hood had sent them back there to have them safe. We took the mules, burned the wagons, and turned the drivers loose. At about seven o'clock that morning we struck the Macon railroad near Lovejoy station, where we expected to form a junction with Stoneman, who had started around the other way. We treated this road like we did the o
July 27th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 1: the raid. Sherman in front of Atlanta. the raid. sleepy guards. pontoon boats. rebel camp Surrenders. in the enemy's land. Palmetto in Ashes. a running fight While Sherman's army lay in front of Atlanta, he determined to send his cavalry on a raid to the enemy's rear, to destroy their railroad communication. So, on July 27th, 1864, General Stoneman moved eastward to pass around the flank of the rebel army, and General Ed. McCook, at the same time, started to pass around the left. McCook's command numbered about 2,000 men, well mounted and equipped, of which the writer was one. We all knew the nature of the mission on which we were sent, and felt that it was difficult. For it is not easy for two thousand men to go behind a hostile army of sixty thousand, and do any damage, andget back. Early on that bright, hot July morning, the bugle called us into line — an inspection was made, and all lame horses or sick men ordered back to camp. We
Edward McCook (search for this): chapter 2
my's rear, to destroy their railroad communication. So, on July 27th, 1864, General Stoneman moved eastward to pass around the flank of the rebel army, and General Ed. McCook, at the same time, started to pass around the left. McCook's command numbered about 2,000 men, well mounted and equipped, of which the writer was one. McCook's command numbered about 2,000 men, well mounted and equipped, of which the writer was one. We all knew the nature of the mission on which we were sent, and felt that it was difficult. For it is not easy for two thousand men to go behind a hostile army of sixty thousand, and do any damage, andget back. Early on that bright, hot July morning, the bugle called us into line — an inspection was made, and all lame ho and Brownlow were chafing like caged tigers. They felt that waiting was fatal. (I have always believed that Croxton could have taken us out of the scrape.) But McCook was loth to leave without first learning the fate of Stoneman. About two o'clock P. M. he gave it up. By this time the rebs had surrounded us, and were just w
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 1: the raid. Sherman in front of Atlanta. the raid. sleepy guards. pontoon boats. rebel camp Surrenders. in the enemy's land. Palmetto in Ashes. a running fight While Sherman's army lay in front of Atlanta, he determined to send his cavalry on a raid to the enemy's rear, to destroy their railroad comAtlanta, he determined to send his cavalry on a raid to the enemy's rear, to destroy their railroad communication. So, on July 27th, 1864, General Stoneman moved eastward to pass around the flank of the rebel army, and General Ed. McCook, at the same time, started to pass around the left. McCook's command numbered about 2,000 men, well mounted and equipped, of which the writer was one. We all knew the nature of the mission nt railroad. When we left the river, after seeing our bridge taken out on the other side, we recognized that we were no longer a part of the great army before Atlanta, but a detached brigade in the enemy's land, with a powerful army between us and our campground. The news of the raid would spread like a prairie fire; we would
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