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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Sergeant Oats, Prison Life in Dixie: giving a short history of the inhuman and barbarous treatment of our soldiers by rebel authorities. Search the whole document.

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April, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 23
Chapter 22: the star-spangled Banner. Preparations for another move. Anxiously waiting. rebel Advice. turned loose. a Pathetic Scene. tears and curses. Manifestations of joy at sight of the old flag. God's country It was the last of April, 1865. Thirtythree hundred prisoners were encamped on that little island. The quartermaster brought in our rations, and we noticed more sacks than usual. What does it mean? The old quartermaster gave a knowing wink, and said he was going to fatten us. We wisely guessed that they were going to move us. The rations measured out three pints of meal per man. Bob and I had our sock full, shook down, and packed-and then had to take part of our rations in his bucket. Next morning we were up by times, and were soon all ready and waiting to see what would happen. Soon a train of cars came down. We were loaded on, and went eastward a few miles — as far as the rails were laid, as the iron had been taken off this road, to mend
railroad-bed and it would take us to Jacksonville — which was in possession of the Yanks. This is the substance of his speech, although he embellished it with much boasting and many oaths. The whole speech was a lie. He was included in Johnson's surrender to Sherman, and was then under orders to go to Tallehasse to turn over his arms to the United States authorities. This we learned after we got out. After this speech the guard opened ranks, and we marched out. Good-bye, Johnniesa few minutes' rest. There were probably three hundred of us together, forming the head of our column. While we were resting we asked the officer of the guard for news, and he told us that Richmond had fallen,--that Lee had surrendered,--that Johnson had surrendered to Sherman,--that the Confederacy had gone to staves, and that Lincoln was dead! It is no use trying to describe the effect of this news on men in our condition. My readers would not understand it-language is too feeble.
oked in amazement at our haggard countenances, meager skeletons and filthy rags. The captain told us that it was but three miles to Jacksonville, and that he would go and have tents and rations ready for us. We came to the infantry picket-line, and there dropped down for a few minutes' rest. There were probably three hundred of us together, forming the head of our column. While we were resting we asked the officer of the guard for news, and he told us that Richmond had fallen,--that Lee had surrendered,--that Johnson had surrendered to Sherman,--that the Confederacy had gone to staves, and that Lincoln was dead! It is no use trying to describe the effect of this news on men in our condition. My readers would not understand it-language is too feeble. We did not need rest after we heard the news. We were not a bit tired. We arose and started toward the town, which was yet three-fourths of a mile distant. About half way to town we met a field band and colors. W
but three miles to Jacksonville, and that he would go and have tents and rations ready for us. We came to the infantry picket-line, and there dropped down for a few minutes' rest. There were probably three hundred of us together, forming the head of our column. While we were resting we asked the officer of the guard for news, and he told us that Richmond had fallen,--that Lee had surrendered,--that Johnson had surrendered to Sherman,--that the Confederacy had gone to staves, and that Lincoln was dead! It is no use trying to describe the effect of this news on men in our condition. My readers would not understand it-language is too feeble. We did not need rest after we heard the news. We were not a bit tired. We arose and started toward the town, which was yet three-fourths of a mile distant. About half way to town we met a field band and colors. We were wild enough before, but when we met the flag we went stark, raving crazy. If we had all been drunk on laughin
uld take us to Jacksonville — which was in possession of the Yanks. This is the substance of his speech, although he embellished it with much boasting and many oaths. The whole speech was a lie. He was included in Johnson's surrender to Sherman, and was then under orders to go to Tallehasse to turn over his arms to the United States authorities. This we learned after we got out. After this speech the guard opened ranks, and we marched out. Good-bye, Johnnies! Good-bye, Yanks! --w were probably three hundred of us together, forming the head of our column. While we were resting we asked the officer of the guard for news, and he told us that Richmond had fallen,--that Lee had surrendered,--that Johnson had surrendered to Sherman,--that the Confederacy had gone to staves, and that Lincoln was dead! It is no use trying to describe the effect of this news on men in our condition. My readers would not understand it-language is too feeble. We did not need rest after
Lake City (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ng to move us. The rations measured out three pints of meal per man. Bob and I had our sock full, shook down, and packed-and then had to take part of our rations in his bucket. Next morning we were up by times, and were soon all ready and waiting to see what would happen. Soon a train of cars came down. We were loaded on, and went eastward a few miles — as far as the rails were laid, as the iron had been taken off this road, to mend others nearly all the way from Jacksonville to Lake City. When we got to the end of the railroad we were ordered off the cars, and marched out on the old road bed ahead of the engine. The colonel who had command of our general then made us a speech. He told us that they were tired of guarding us. They knew our time was out, and that we were anxious to get home. They were going to the front to fight, and so had decided to turn us loose. He advised us to go home, and stay there; and to tell our friends at the North that we could never w
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 23
stance of his speech, although he embellished it with much boasting and many oaths. The whole speech was a lie. He was included in Johnson's surrender to Sherman, and was then under orders to go to Tallehasse to turn over his arms to the United States authorities. This we learned after we got out. After this speech the guard opened ranks, and we marched out. Good-bye, Johnnies! Good-bye, Yanks! --were the parting salutations. Were we really free? Could we go or stop, as we pleasarried to others still farther back — to be repeated again and again,--giving new vigor to weary limbs that had almost refused to do duty longer. That shout doubtless reached three or four miles back along that road. Yes, sir! It was the United States uniform! I have seen a good many fine clothes in my life-but I never saw anything, before or since, that looked so pretty as those cavalry jackets! We started toward them at once, and went to where the troop was waiting. If we were
Jacksonville (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
iles — as far as the rails were laid, as the iron had been taken off this road, to mend others nearly all the way from Jacksonville to Lake City. When we got to the end of the railroad we were ordered off the cars, and marched out on the old roadNorth that we could never whip the rebels in the world! He told us to follow the railroad-bed and it would take us to Jacksonville — which was in possession of the Yanks. This is the substance of his speech, although he embellished it with muchd become of it? I do not remember how far we had to travel. It seems like it was forty-two miles from our camp to Jacksonville; but I can't remember how far they took us on the cars. I think it was eight or ten miles, but am not sure. In ou at our haggard countenances, meager skeletons and filthy rags. The captain told us that it was but three miles to Jacksonville, and that he would go and have tents and rations ready for us. We came to the infantry picket-line, and there drop
Specks De Yanks (search for this): chapter 23
nd it would take us to Jacksonville — which was in possession of the Yanks. This is the substance of his speech, although he embellished it with much boasting and many oaths. The whole speech was a lie. He was included in Johnson's surrender to Sherman, and was then under orders to go to Tallehasse to turn over his arms to the United States authorities. This we learned after we got out. After this speech the guard opened ranks, and we marched out. Good-bye, Johnnies! Good-bye, Yanks! --were the parting salutations. Were we really free? Could we go or stop, as we pleased? It was like a dream! It was so sudden-so unexpected. Our minds were not prepared for it. We could hardly realize it. We felt like shouting! A great load had been suddenly lifted-but how? What had become of it? I do not remember how far we had to travel. It seems like it was forty-two miles from our camp to Jacksonville; but I can't remember how far they took us on the cars. I think it wa