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the hole the next day, and start the bloodhounds from it. Oh, those hounds! How we dreaded them! Let the beast's once catch the scent of a poor fugitive, and he was gone up. After the outer stockade was built, it greatly increased the difficulty of tunneling, as it would require a length of about two hundred and twenty-five feet to safely pass under both walls. Still there were men desperate enough to attempt it. One company, after weeks of toil and danger, on a rainy night in August, opened their hole, and crawled to the outer world. I think there were fifteen or twenty went through, though there were so many conflicting reports that I do not pretend to give exact numbers. The gang of Johnnies that came every morning to count the nineties, found the deficit and reported it. We were notified from headquarters that we would get no rations till those men were found. We did not believe it; we thought it was done to scare us. We only got one scanty little feed each da
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 8: plans of escape. Taken back to the pen. plans of escape. Tunnels. bloodhounds. poor drummer boy. our plan Rebels and Yanks worked together till the wounded were all out of the wreck, which was probably about midnight. We did not get all the dead out till daylight next morning. A construction train came down next morning, unloaded its gang of men, took up the wounded, and returned to Andersonville. It returned about noon, and after getting the debris out of the way, and getting all the cars that could be run on the track, they took us back to the pen. One of the smashed cars was covered with a tin roof, of which I secured a piece about 20x24 inches, and after getting into prison, I made me a nice pan, by turning up about four inches all around. It proved to be a very valuable piece of property after we began to draw our rations. When the train came back after taking the wounded, they brought the bloodhounds and took a circuit around the wr
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
undred miles and comply with these conditions is a bigger job than it looks to be till you have worked at it for a week or two. The question of subsistence makes the problem still harder. After getting all the knowledge and hints I could, I told Cudge S., and asked him to go with me. He would not risk it. I tried Tom B. He heard my plan, and gave me his hand on it. Our plan was to be taken out, if possible, so as to leave in the evening, so that night would be on the first part of the road; to jump off at some point before we reached Macon; then to travel northwest until we reached the Chattahoochee, and reached the high mountainous divide between it and the waters of the Tombigbee; thence north till we would reach our lines, somewhere between Big Shanty and Resaca. We expected a four hundred miles trip, and thought we could make it in a month. We expected to keep hid by day till we reached the wooded hills of Alabama, when we hoped to be able to travel a little by day.
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ndred miles and comply with these conditions is a bigger job than it looks to be till you have worked at it for a week or two. The question of subsistence makes the problem still harder. After getting all the knowledge and hints I could, I told Cudge S., and asked him to go with me. He would not risk it. I tried Tom B. He heard my plan, and gave me his hand on it. Our plan was to be taken out, if possible, so as to leave in the evening, so that night would be on the first part of the road; to jump off at some point before we reached Macon; then to travel northwest until we reached the Chattahoochee, and reached the high mountainous divide between it and the waters of the Tombigbee; thence north till we would reach our lines, somewhere between Big Shanty and Resaca. We expected a four hundred miles trip, and thought we could make it in a month. We expected to keep hid by day till we reached the wooded hills of Alabama, when we hoped to be able to travel a little by day.
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ndred miles and comply with these conditions is a bigger job than it looks to be till you have worked at it for a week or two. The question of subsistence makes the problem still harder. After getting all the knowledge and hints I could, I told Cudge S., and asked him to go with me. He would not risk it. I tried Tom B. He heard my plan, and gave me his hand on it. Our plan was to be taken out, if possible, so as to leave in the evening, so that night would be on the first part of the road; to jump off at some point before we reached Macon; then to travel northwest until we reached the Chattahoochee, and reached the high mountainous divide between it and the waters of the Tombigbee; thence north till we would reach our lines, somewhere between Big Shanty and Resaca. We expected a four hundred miles trip, and thought we could make it in a month. We expected to keep hid by day till we reached the wooded hills of Alabama, when we hoped to be able to travel a little by day.
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
l the sack along by one string, he keeping the end of the other to pull it back. A third man would take the dirt away in another sack, pants-leg or blouse-sleeve, and scatter it where it would not be noticed. A man could hardly get his breath in the tunnel; and owing to the sandy nature of the ground, there was always danger of caving in. It was hard to keep it secret, for there were men in the pen mean enough to tell the rebels of any such attempt. There was a fellow (he died at Savannah) who wore a large T on his forehead. He informed on a tunnel company when they were nearly through, and they made the T with a hot railroad spike. After that, when a sneak reported on his fellow-prisoners, the rebs took him out of the pen, and we saw him no more. If all these dangers and difficulties were surmounted, and the tunnel was opened, the rebs would find the hole the next day, and start the bloodhounds from it. Oh, those hounds! How we dreaded them! Let the beast's once
Specks Yanks (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 8: plans of escape. Taken back to the pen. plans of escape. Tunnels. bloodhounds. poor drummer boy. our plan Rebels and Yanks worked together till the wounded were all out of the wreck, which was probably about midnight. We did not get all the dead out till daylight next morning. A construction train came down next morning, unloaded its gang of men, took up the wounded, and returned to Andersonville. It returned about noon, and after getting the debris out of the way, and getting all the cars that could be run on the track, they took us back to the pen. One of the smashed cars was covered with a tin roof, of which I secured a piece about 20x24 inches, and after getting into prison, I made me a nice pan, by turning up about four inches all around. It proved to be a very valuable piece of property after we began to draw our rations. When the train came back after taking the wounded, they brought the bloodhounds and took a circuit around the wr