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Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
me. On this morning, the commanding officer of the Eighteenth Infantry having been directed to detail a company to advance and feel for the enemy, Capt. Anson Mills was sent with his company to the front and entered Resaca, returning with some 20 prisoners, and reporting that the enemy had evacuated Resaca and left our front. The brigade then moved into Resaca, and on the morning of the 17th started with the rest of the army in pursuit, passing through Adairsville and Calhoun on the 18th, Kingston on the 19th, and to a point near Cass Station on the 20th, where we remained till the 24th. At this point all the regimental wagons were taken, by order of the division commander, which will account for the subsequent delay in reports, all company and regimental papers and desks being left behind. The brigade again moved on the 24th, crossing the Etowah River at Island Ford, passing Burnt Hickory, and reaching Pickett's Mills, or New Hope, on the evening of the 26th. Here the brigade wa
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
ommissioned officers, 39; enlisted men, 1,318; aggregate, 1,357. I transmit herewith the reports of the commanders of such battaions as remained with the brigade on the 1st of September, 1864. I cannot close this report without calling attention to the fact that smore than one-half of an entire campaign of 120 days was passed by this brigade under the fire of the enemy, and that in every position in which they were placed, both officers and men performed their duty so as to entitle them to the thanks and gratitude of the country. I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant, John R. Edie, Major Fifteenth Infantry, Commanding. Capt. G. W. Smith, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Division, 14th Army Corps. Addenda: recapitulation of casualties during the campaign in Georgia ending September 2, 1864. Zzz John R. Edie, Major Fifteenth Infantry, Commanding. headquarters Second brigade, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 16, 1864.
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
rdous point is worthy of great commendation, and I take great pleasure in bearing testimony to their gallantry. It having been ascertained on the morning of the 6th of June that the enemy had again fallen back from our front, the brigade, with the rest of the army, started in pursuit and marched to a point near Big Shanty, on the Georgia State railroad. Here we remained till June 10, when the brigade again marched, skirmishing and feeling for the enemy till the 22d, when it reached Kenesaw Mountain and relieved a brigade of the Fourth Corps, commanded by General Whitaker. Here we remained within 100 yards of the enemy's works and under fire of his artillery and sharpshooters till the morning of the 3d of July, when the opposing force once more retreated, and we again followed, picking up more prisoners and deserters by the way. The brigade passed through Marietta on the morning of the 3d in pursuit of the retreating enemy, following him in the direction of the Chattahoochee River
Etowah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
a, and on the morning of the 17th started with the rest of the army in pursuit, passing through Adairsville and Calhoun on the 18th, Kingston on the 19th, and to a point near Cass Station on the 20th, where we remained till the 24th. At this point all the regimental wagons were taken, by order of the division commander, which will account for the subsequent delay in reports, all company and regimental papers and desks being left behind. The brigade again moved on the 24th, crossing the Etowah River at Island Ford, passing Burnt Hickory, and reaching Pickett's Mills, or New Hope, on the evening of the 26th. Here the brigade was put in line of battle as a support to a part of the Fourth Corps, and at night threw up works covering their whole front. The brigade remained in this position from the 27th of May till the 5th day of June, under fire all the time. Incessant vigilance and resolute determination were all the time necessary to hold the position. The enemy kept up during thes
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
509 men. The brigade staff at the commencement of the campaign was: First Lieut. William J. Lyster, aidede-camp, acting assistant adjutant-general and ordnance officer; First Lieut. H. G. Litchfield, acting assistant inspector-general; Capt. J. B. Mulligan, provost-marshal; Capt. J. R. Morledge, commissary of subsistence; Surg. Lewis Slusser, brigade medical director. We left Ringgold on the morning of the 7th with the rest of the division, marching via Tunnel Hill in the direction of Dalton, Ga., the vicinity of which place we reached on the 9th of May, took position in front of Buzzard Roost Mountain, within range of the enemy's guns, posted on its summit. The brigade remained in this position till the 11th, when it was moved back about half a mile to get out of range of the rebel guns, some small loss having been sustained from their fire. On the 11th the Sixty-ninth Regiment Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Col. M. F. Moore, having returned from its veteran furlough, rejoined the br
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
Hdqrs. Second Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., September 3, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to sding some four or five miles, we reached a point on the Jonesborough road, about a mile and a half from the town and the rain of a point on the railroad, about two miles north of Jonesborough, and held it until the troops of the Fourth Corps occupng. Hdqrs. Second Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., September 2, 1864. Hdqrs. Second Brig., First Div. at Ringgold, Ga., and ended 1st of September, 1864, at Jonesborough, some twenty-two miles south of Atlanta, on the railrour on the 1st of September we moved in the direction of Jonesborough. On this day the memorable engagement of Jonesborough Jonesborough took place. As I have made that engagement the subject of a special report, I would respectfully refer to that report for aat I may not be too voluminous. On the 2d we went into Jonesborough, where we remained till the afternoon of the 4th, when
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
ral commanding the division the following report of the operations of this brigade on the 1st instant: At an early hour in the morning we took up our line of march from Mrs. Evans' farm in the direction of the railroad leading from Atlanta to Macon. We marched in rear of the Third Brigade. After proceeding some four or five miles, we reached a point on the Jonesborough road, about a mile and a half from the town and the railroad. A line of battle was there formed on the left of the Third the operations of this brigade during the campaign which commenced 7th of May, 1864, at Ringgold, Ga., and ended 1st of September, 1864, at Jonesborough, some twenty-two miles south of Atlanta, on the railroad leading from the latter place to Macon, Ga.: The brigade was under the command of Brig. Gen. John H. King, and was constituted as follows: First Battalion, Fifteenth Infantry, Maj. Albert Tracy, 8 officers, 376 men; Second Battalion, Fifteenth Infantry, Maj. J. R. Edie, 10 officers,
Island Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
rning of the 17th started with the rest of the army in pursuit, passing through Adairsville and Calhoun on the 18th, Kingston on the 19th, and to a point near Cass Station on the 20th, where we remained till the 24th. At this point all the regimental wagons were taken, by order of the division commander, which will account for the subsequent delay in reports, all company and regimental papers and desks being left behind. The brigade again moved on the 24th, crossing the Etowah River at Island Ford, passing Burnt Hickory, and reaching Pickett's Mills, or New Hope, on the evening of the 26th. Here the brigade was put in line of battle as a support to a part of the Fourth Corps, and at night threw up works covering their whole front. The brigade remained in this position from the 27th of May till the 5th day of June, under fire all the time. Incessant vigilance and resolute determination were all the time necessary to hold the position. The enemy kept up during these days a contin
Tunnel Hill (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
428 men. Total, 81 officers, 2,509 men. The brigade staff at the commencement of the campaign was: First Lieut. William J. Lyster, aidede-camp, acting assistant adjutant-general and ordnance officer; First Lieut. H. G. Litchfield, acting assistant inspector-general; Capt. J. B. Mulligan, provost-marshal; Capt. J. R. Morledge, commissary of subsistence; Surg. Lewis Slusser, brigade medical director. We left Ringgold on the morning of the 7th with the rest of the division, marching via Tunnel Hill in the direction of Dalton, Ga., the vicinity of which place we reached on the 9th of May, took position in front of Buzzard Roost Mountain, within range of the enemy's guns, posted on its summit. The brigade remained in this position till the 11th, when it was moved back about half a mile to get out of range of the rebel guns, some small loss having been sustained from their fire. On the 11th the Sixty-ninth Regiment Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Col. M. F. Moore, having returned from its v
Nancys Creek (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
, until the 17th of July, when, the enemy having once more made a retrograde movement, we crossed the Chattahoochee at Pace's Ferry. On the 13th, and during our stay on the north side of the Chattahoochee, General Johnson having returned from leave of absence, General King resumed command of the brigade. On the 15th of July the Sixty-ninth Ohio Volunteers were temporarily detached from this brigade and attached to the Third Brigade of the division. July 18, pushed forward and crossed Nancy's Creek in pursuit. July 20, crossed Peach Tree Creek and took position in line of battle in the afternoon of that day. Here, although the brigade was not actively engaged with the enemy, it was exposed to a dangerous fire of shell and canister, which the enemy opened upon our forces. In the evening the brigade was ordered to the left about two miles to fill a gap on General Newton's left, the Fifteenth Infantry being detached and sent to a mill farther to the left to guard a bridge crossing t
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