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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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lowing report in regard to the part taken by my regiment in the action of September 1: The regiment, under command of Col. William T. C. Grower, joined this command August 21, and accompanied it in its several marches till the p. m. of the 1st instant, nothing of especial interest occurring. Between 3 and 4 p. m. of the 1st instant the regiment was formed in rear of the Tenth Michigan, about one mile from the railroad, northeast of Jonesborough, Ga., and moved forward toward the enemy's wo1st instant the regiment was formed in rear of the Tenth Michigan, about one mile from the railroad, northeast of Jonesborough, Ga., and moved forward toward the enemy's works. The regiments in our front moved to the right, while the Seventeenth kept straight forward and came to a muddy ravine, grown up thick with brush, which was very difficult to cross; the regiment was crossed and formed as rapidly as possible; moved to the right and front and formed line on the left of the Sixtieth Illinois, and moved rapidly up the hill to the woods, from which the enemy was firing. Arriving near the woods the regiment moved to the left and then forward into the woods. I
irected me to that position. By his direction I had a rifle-pit thrown up in front of my line, and the regiment rested for the night. Many prisoners came in through my line, and I sent a guard to take charge of them. I passed over hundreds of muskets, but would not allow my men to stop to pick them up. All my officers and men obeyed orders promptly and fought well. My losses were heavy, as the accompanying list Omitted. of casualties shows. Colonel Grower died of his wounds on the 3d instant. In him the Government has lost one of its bravest and noblest defenders, and the regiment its beloved commander. Capt. John Canty, who was mortally wounded, showed himself, as he always has, a gallant officer, and the same is true of Capt. Hiram Wilde, who was slightly wounded. The regiment lost 4 commissioned officers wounded, 23 enlisted men killed, and 70 wounded. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. O. Martin, Major, Commanding Seventeenth New York Vet. Vols. Lieut.
August 21st (search for this): chapter 137
No. 133. report of Maj. Joel O. Martin, Seventeenth New York Infantry, of operations September 1. Hdqrs. Seventeenth Regt. New York Vet. Vols., Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. Lieutenant: I have the honor to make the following report in regard to the part taken by my regiment in the action of September 1: The regiment, under command of Col. William T. C. Grower, joined this command August 21, and accompanied it in its several marches till the p. m. of the 1st instant, nothing of especial interest occurring. Between 3 and 4 p. m. of the 1st instant the regiment was formed in rear of the Tenth Michigan, about one mile from the railroad, northeast of Jonesborough, Ga., and moved forward toward the enemy's works. The regiments in our front moved to the right, while the Seventeenth kept straight forward and came to a muddy ravine, grown up thick with brush, which was very difficult to cross; the regiment was crossed and formed as rapidly as possible; moved to the ri
September 1st (search for this): chapter 137
No. 133. report of Maj. Joel O. Martin, Seventeenth New York Infantry, of operations September 1. Hdqrs. Seventeenth Regt. New York Vet. Vols., Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. Lieutenant: I have the honor to make the following report in regard to the part taken by my regiment in the action of September 1: The regiment, under command of Col. William T. C. Grower, joined this command August 21, and accompanied it in its several marches till the p. m. of the 1st instant, nothiSeptember 1: The regiment, under command of Col. William T. C. Grower, joined this command August 21, and accompanied it in its several marches till the p. m. of the 1st instant, nothing of especial interest occurring. Between 3 and 4 p. m. of the 1st instant the regiment was formed in rear of the Tenth Michigan, about one mile from the railroad, northeast of Jonesborough, Ga., and moved forward toward the enemy's works. The regiments in our front moved to the right, while the Seventeenth kept straight forward and came to a muddy ravine, grown up thick with brush, which was very difficult to cross; the regiment was crossed and formed as rapidly as possible; moved to the r
September 5th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 137
No. 133. report of Maj. Joel O. Martin, Seventeenth New York Infantry, of operations September 1. Hdqrs. Seventeenth Regt. New York Vet. Vols., Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. Lieutenant: I have the honor to make the following report in regard to the part taken by my regiment in the action of September 1: The regiment, under command of Col. William T. C. Grower, joined this command August 21, and accompanied it in its several marches till the p. m. of the 1st instant, nothing of especial interest occurring. Between 3 and 4 p. m. of the 1st instant the regiment was formed in rear of the Tenth Michigan, about one mile from the railroad, northeast of Jonesborough, Ga., and moved forward toward the enemy's works. The regiments in our front moved to the right, while the Seventeenth kept straight forward and came to a muddy ravine, grown up thick with brush, which was very difficult to cross; the regiment was crossed and formed as rapidly as possible; moved to the ri
ont of my line, and the regiment rested for the night. Many prisoners came in through my line, and I sent a guard to take charge of them. I passed over hundreds of muskets, but would not allow my men to stop to pick them up. All my officers and men obeyed orders promptly and fought well. My losses were heavy, as the accompanying list Omitted. of casualties shows. Colonel Grower died of his wounds on the 3d instant. In him the Government has lost one of its bravest and noblest defenders, and the regiment its beloved commander. Capt. John Canty, who was mortally wounded, showed himself, as he always has, a gallant officer, and the same is true of Capt. Hiram Wilde, who was slightly wounded. The regiment lost 4 commissioned officers wounded, 23 enlisted men killed, and 70 wounded. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. O. Martin, Major, Commanding Seventeenth New York Vet. Vols. Lieut. John P. Hollers, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 14th Army Corps.
George P. Este (search for this): chapter 137
oved rapidly up the hill to the woods, from which the enemy was firing. Arriving near the woods the regiment moved to the left and then forward into the woods. I have since been informed that Colonel Grower made this movement oy direction of Colonel Este, commanding the Third Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, for the purpose of supporting that brigade. Here the regiment came under very heavy fire, to which the right wing replied sharply. I discovered that some of our troops wer told him I feared I should not be able to find the Sixtieth without some one to direct me; said he could send no one. I moved forward in the direction he indicated, and soon came upon the Third Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. Colonel Este, commanding this brigade, told me he could not tell me where Colonel Lum's brigade was, but was sure they were not in his front, and he did not think I could find it. Said he was hard pressed and wished me to assist him; that he had a vacant p
William T. C. Grower (search for this): chapter 137
taken by my regiment in the action of September 1: The regiment, under command of Col. William T. C. Grower, joined this command August 21, and accompanied it in its several marches till the p. regiment moved to the left and then forward into the woods. I have since been informed that Colonel Grower made this movement oy direction of Colonel Este, commanding the Third Brigade, Third Divisiodered the firing to cease in that wing. The men stood their ground well, but fell rapidly. Colonel Grower soon fell mortally wounded, and I took command of the regiment. Colonel Grower ordered me tColonel Grower ordered me to find whether I was supported on my right or left, and, if not, to fall back and reform the regiment. Finding nothing on my right or left I moved the regiment back to the edge of the woods and reforght well. My losses were heavy, as the accompanying list Omitted. of casualties shows. Colonel Grower died of his wounds on the 3d instant. In him the Government has lost one of its bravest an
John P. Hollers (search for this): chapter 137
ont of my line, and the regiment rested for the night. Many prisoners came in through my line, and I sent a guard to take charge of them. I passed over hundreds of muskets, but would not allow my men to stop to pick them up. All my officers and men obeyed orders promptly and fought well. My losses were heavy, as the accompanying list Omitted. of casualties shows. Colonel Grower died of his wounds on the 3d instant. In him the Government has lost one of its bravest and noblest defenders, and the regiment its beloved commander. Capt. John Canty, who was mortally wounded, showed himself, as he always has, a gallant officer, and the same is true of Capt. Hiram Wilde, who was slightly wounded. The regiment lost 4 commissioned officers wounded, 23 enlisted men killed, and 70 wounded. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. O. Martin, Major, Commanding Seventeenth New York Vet. Vols. Lieut. John P. Hollers, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 14th Army Corps.
Charles M. Lum (search for this): chapter 137
eft of it. Here Lieutenant McAllister, aide-de-camp, came and ordered me to move forward and form on the left of the Sixtieth Illinois, which was some distance in the woods. I told him I feared I should not be able to find the Sixtieth without some one to direct me; said he could send no one. I moved forward in the direction he indicated, and soon came upon the Third Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. Colonel Este, commanding this brigade, told me he could not tell me where Colonel Lum's brigade was, but was sure they were not in his front, and he did not think I could find it. Said he was hard pressed and wished me to assist him; that he had a vacant place on his left and was much exposed. I accordingly formed my regiment on the left of his brigade. After holding this position for a while a colonel (I think Colonel Moore), commanding a brigade on my left in the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, came to me and said the enemy was turning his left flank, and that h
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