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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
Atlanta, and immediately attacked the enemy, who had his position along the Jonesborough road, west of the Macon railroad, his left resting on Jonesborough and occupJonesborough and occupying that place. Our line of battle was formed in the shape of a wedge — the Twenty-third Army Corps forming the left, the Fourth and Fifteenth Corps forming the poiird, Fourth, and Fourteenth Army Corps about two and a half miles north of Jonesborough, fronting Atlanta; and the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps in the immediate neighborhood and north of Jonesborough, fronting south. September 2 the Fourth and Fourteenth Army Corps attacked the field fortifications erected by thes. In the mean time the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps attacked Jonesborough, driving the enemy out of the place, and at 10 o'clock, September 2, our forces were one mile south of Jonesborough, and four miles north of the same place, in possession of five miles of railroad, which we at once destroyed. Our forces had
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
September 2 the Fourth and Fourteenth Army Corps attacked the field fortifications erected by the rebels during the previous night, and after about fifteen minutes fight took 10 guns and 500 prisoners. In the mean time the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps attacked Jonesborough, driving the enemy out of the place, and at 10 o'clock, September 2, our forces were one mile south of Jonesborough, and four miles north of the same place, in possession of five miles of railroad, which we at once destroyed. Our forces had pressed the enemy toward Rough and Ready, which place was shelled by our troops at noon. This information was given by Lieut. H. H. Russell, First Veteran Volunteer Engineers, Department of the Cumberland, who left the scene of action on September 2 at noon. Sir, I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant, John Rziha, Captain, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry. Brig. Gen. R. Delafield, Chief Engineer, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ld respectfully report on the position of our army during the battle of September I and 2: Our army, moving south of Atlanta, with the view of taking and destroying the Macon railroad, arrived September 1 sixteen miles south of Atlanta, and immAtlanta, and immediately attacked the enemy, who had his position along the Jonesborough road, west of the Macon railroad, his left resting on Jonesborough and occupying that place. Our line of battle was formed in the shape of a wedge — the Twenty-third Army Corpber 1 we broke the enemy's center. His right, composed of a corps of veterans and State militia, retreated north toward Atlanta, and two corps of the rebels toward the south. The rebels who were retreating north erected a line of field fortificati 1 was, the Twenty-third, Fourth, and Fourteenth Army Corps about two and a half miles north of Jonesborough, fronting Atlanta; and the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps in the immediate neighborhood and north of Jonesborough, fronting s
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
No. 10. report of Capt. John Rziha, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, acting engineer officer, of operations September 1-2, 1864. Hdqrs. Department of the Cumberland, office of Chief engineer, Chattanooga, Tenn., September 5, 1864. General: I would respectfully report on the position of our army during the battle of September I and 2: Our army, moving south of Atlanta, with the view of taking and destroying the Macon railroad, arrived September 1 sixteen miles south of Atlanta, and immediately attacked the enemy, who had his position along the Jonesborough road, west of the Macon railroad, his left resting on Jonesborough and occupying that place. Our line of battle was formed in the shape of a wedge — the Twenty-third Army Corps forming the left, the Fourth and Fifteenth Corps forming the point of the wedge, the Fourth Corps joining the Twenty-third Corps, the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Corps were on the right of the Fifteenth Corps, the Seventeenth Corps on our extreme right
John Rziha (search for this): chapter 14
No. 10. report of Capt. John Rziha, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, acting engineer officer, of operations September 1-2, 1864. Hdqrs. Department of the Cumberland, office of Chief engineer, Chattanooga, Tenn., September 5, 1864. General: I would respectfully report on the position of our army during the battle of September I and 2: Our army, moving south of Atlanta, with the view of taking and destroying the Macon railroad, arrived September 1 sixteen miles south of Atlanta, and immediately attacked the enemy, who had his position along the Jonesborough road, west of the Macon railroad, his left resting on Jonesborough and occupying that place. Our line of battle was formed in the shape of a wedge — the Twenty-third Army Corps forming the left, the Fourth and Fifteenth Corps forming the point of the wedge, the Fourth Corps joining the Twenty-third Corps, the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Corps were on the right of the Fifteenth Corps, the Seventeenth Corps on our extreme right
H. H. Russell (search for this): chapter 14
September 2 the Fourth and Fourteenth Army Corps attacked the field fortifications erected by the rebels during the previous night, and after about fifteen minutes fight took 10 guns and 500 prisoners. In the mean time the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps attacked Jonesborough, driving the enemy out of the place, and at 10 o'clock, September 2, our forces were one mile south of Jonesborough, and four miles north of the same place, in possession of five miles of railroad, which we at once destroyed. Our forces had pressed the enemy toward Rough and Ready, which place was shelled by our troops at noon. This information was given by Lieut. H. H. Russell, First Veteran Volunteer Engineers, Department of the Cumberland, who left the scene of action on September 2 at noon. Sir, I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant, John Rziha, Captain, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry. Brig. Gen. R. Delafield, Chief Engineer, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.
R. Delafield (search for this): chapter 14
September 2 the Fourth and Fourteenth Army Corps attacked the field fortifications erected by the rebels during the previous night, and after about fifteen minutes fight took 10 guns and 500 prisoners. In the mean time the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps attacked Jonesborough, driving the enemy out of the place, and at 10 o'clock, September 2, our forces were one mile south of Jonesborough, and four miles north of the same place, in possession of five miles of railroad, which we at once destroyed. Our forces had pressed the enemy toward Rough and Ready, which place was shelled by our troops at noon. This information was given by Lieut. H. H. Russell, First Veteran Volunteer Engineers, Department of the Cumberland, who left the scene of action on September 2 at noon. Sir, I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant, John Rziha, Captain, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry. Brig. Gen. R. Delafield, Chief Engineer, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.
September 1st (search for this): chapter 14
on of our army during the battle of September I and 2: Our army, moving south of Atlanta, with the view of taking and destroying the Macon railroad, arrived September 1 sixteen miles south of Atlanta, and immediately attacked the enemy, who had his position along the Jonesborough road, west of the Macon railroad, his left restnd Seventeenth Corps were on the right of the Fifteenth Corps, the Seventeenth Corps on our extreme right; the Fourteenth Corps was held in reserve. About noon September 1 we broke the enemy's center. His right, composed of a corps of veterans and State militia, retreated north toward Atlanta, and two corps of the rebels toward tere retreating north erected a line of field fortifications near where the road from Rough and Ready crosses the Macon railroad. Our position on the evening of September 1 was, the Twenty-third, Fourth, and Fourteenth Army Corps about two and a half miles north of Jonesborough, fronting Atlanta; and the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and
September 2nd (search for this): chapter 14
f Jonesborough, fronting Atlanta; and the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps in the immediate neighborhood and north of Jonesborough, fronting south. September 2 the Fourth and Fourteenth Army Corps attacked the field fortifications erected by the rebels during the previous night, and after about fifteen minutes fight tond 500 prisoners. In the mean time the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps attacked Jonesborough, driving the enemy out of the place, and at 10 o'clock, September 2, our forces were one mile south of Jonesborough, and four miles north of the same place, in possession of five miles of railroad, which we at once destroyed. ps at noon. This information was given by Lieut. H. H. Russell, First Veteran Volunteer Engineers, Department of the Cumberland, who left the scene of action on September 2 at noon. Sir, I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant, John Rziha, Captain, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry. Brig. Gen. R. De
September 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 14
No. 10. report of Capt. John Rziha, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, acting engineer officer, of operations September 1-2, 1864. Hdqrs. Department of the Cumberland, office of Chief engineer, Chattanooga, Tenn., September 5, 1864. General: I would respectfully report on the position of our army during the battle of September I and 2: Our army, moving south of Atlanta, with the view of taking and destroying the Macon railroad, arrived September 1 sixteen miles south of Atlanta, and immediately attacked the enemy, who had his position along the Jonesborough road, west of the Macon railroad, his left resting on Jonesborough and occupying that place. Our line of battle was formed in the shape of a wedge — the Twenty-third Army Corps forming the left, the Fourth and Fifteenth Corps forming the point of the wedge, the Fourth Corps joining the Twenty-third Corps, the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Corps were on the right of the Fifteenth Corps, the Seventeenth Corps on our extreme righ
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