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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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d men engaged in this most successful effort to reach and cut the railroad. I would not assert it positively, but from all the facts I have learned Carlton and Grosvenor led the first of our troops who cut the railroad. During the day and night my brigade captured 43 prisoners from the enemy. Captains Curtis and Whedon, of my staff, took a very active and honorable part in the operations of the day and night, rendering Colonel Hunter the most efficient assistance. On the morning of the 1st, by direction of General Baird, I withdrew my troops from the railroad. At 12 m. marched with the other brigades on the Jonesborough road, having detached the Thirty-first Ohio to guard the trains at --Creek; passed the Second Brigade and formed a line of battle; was soon ordered to move to the front, our troops now having engaged the enemy and a brisk fight going on about one mile north of Jonesborough. On coming up I found Moore's brigade, of Carlin's division, and Este's, of ours, abou
Este's brigade with my front line, and assisted in carrying off his killed and wounded-alas! too many of whom we found upon that bloody field. Groping my way in the darkness to those bloody trenches, stumbling at almost every step over the dead and dying as I placed fresh lines of men in them, in the midst of other thoughts I shuddered that such was the work of my countrymen. At midnight, and for an hour later, the air was rent by the explosion of ammunition at Atlanta. At 10 a. m. of the 2d I was ordered to advance toward the town. The enemy had retreated, leaving us to bury their dead and care for their badly wounded. Formed a new line, facing diagonally to the rear; at night took up a new position north of east and about one mile from the town of Jonesborough. On the morning of the 3d discovered five of the enemy's field hospitals in which were yet remaining over 300 badly wounded men, several surgeons and hospital attendants, and one chaplain. On the 3d, 4th, and 5th remai
d by night and day to the enemy's fire, and we had much hot work on the skirmish line. Our lines were constantly in close proximity to the enemy. July 1 and 2, remained in position. On the night of the 2d the enemy evacuated Marietta. On the 3d marched through the suburbs of Marietta, on the Atlanta road, and took up a position four miles south of the town and west of the railroad. On the 4th moved about one-fourth of a mile, and took up a position in reserve. On the 5th moved to a posit and about one mile from the town of Jonesborough. On the morning of the 3d discovered five of the enemy's field hospitals in which were yet remaining over 300 badly wounded men, several surgeons and hospital attendants, and one chaplain. On the 3d, 4th, and 5th remained in camp sending out small foraging parties, who took in all about 25 prisoners. At 12 m. on the 6th marched to a position about one-half mile from the battleground. On the 7th, acting as the rear guard, marched to a position
uly 1 and 2, remained in position. On the night of the 2d the enemy evacuated Marietta. On the 3d marched through the suburbs of Marietta, on the Atlanta road, and took up a position four miles south of the town and west of the railroad. On the 4th moved about one-fourth of a mile, and took up a position in reserve. On the 5th moved to a position on the railroad ten miles from Atlanta. 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th, remained in position. On the 10th moved to Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee Re enemy could have made. Such was the nature of our position here that it became necessary to watch our right flank vigilantly, and my brigade was placed in position almost perpendicular to the rear and right of Colonel Gleason's brigade. On the 4th sent the Eighty-second Indiana, Eighty-ninth Ohio, and Twentythird Missouri, under Colonel Hunter, to support the Second Brigade in a reconnaissance; took the enemy's rifle-pits and captured about 30 prisoners. On the 5th advanced our skirmish lin
d took up a position four miles south of the town and west of the railroad. On the 4th moved about one-fourth of a mile, and took up a position in reserve. On the 5th moved to a position on the railroad ten miles from Atlanta. 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th, remained in position. On the 10th moved to Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoocheed Twentythird Missouri, under Colonel Hunter, to support the Second Brigade in a reconnaissance; took the enemy's rifle-pits and captured about 30 prisoners. On the 5th advanced our skirmish line and again took the enemy's rifle-pits and captured 56 prisoners out of the works; took up an advanced position, posting the Seventeenth Os of my report will not admit. I cannot, however, omit to mention the brilliant gallantry of Capt. Michael Stone, Thirty-first Ohio, who, on the morning of the 5th instant, in charge of the skirmish line, charged the rebel rifle-pits, taking the works and capturing 2 lieutenants and 54 non-commissioned officers and privates. The
ed lines on the left of the division, as well as the right, having four regiments, the Thirty-first, Eighty-ninth, and Ninety-second Ohio and Eightysecond Indiana on the left, and the Seventeenth Ohio and Twentythird Missouri on the right. On the 7th I pressed forward my line to a new position about 200 yards from the enemy's works; took up and fortified a line from which we held the enemy close within his lines, compelling him to keep his men constantly covered behind his works. About 100 med hospital attendants, and one chaplain. On the 3d, 4th, and 5th remained in camp sending out small foraging parties, who took in all about 25 prisoners. At 12 m. on the 6th marched to a position about one-half mile from the battleground. On the 7th, acting as the rear guard, marched to a position one and a half miles from Rough and Ready and encamped for the night. At 4 a. m. on the morning of the 8th took charge of the trains and marched to our present position. The health and spirits of
and after a hard day's march encamped near Tunnel Hill, Ga., throwing out a picket guard of one regiment, the Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. On the 8th we marched to a position opposite Buzzard Roost Gap. On the 9th, 10th, and 11th the brigade remained in camp in line of battle. On the 12th marched through Snake to Smith's house, eight miles from Acworth. 6th, remained in camp. 7th, marched through Acworth into camp, one mile south. 8th and 9th, remained in camp. On the 8th the Thirty-first Ohio was sent to Cartersville in charge of a supply train. On the 9th the Nineteenth Illinois Infantry was relieved from duty to be mustered out os, Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864. Miajor: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my brigade from the 7th day of August to the 8th instant, inclusive: On the 7th of August the brigade remained in its old position on the hills southeast of Utoy Creek, holding our advanced lines on the left of th
at Ringgold, Ga., and after a hard day's march encamped near Tunnel Hill, Ga., throwing out a picket guard of one regiment, the Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. On the 8th we marched to a position opposite Buzzard Roost Gap. On the 9th, 10th, and 11th the brigade remained in camp in line of battle. On the 12th marched through Snake Creek Gap to a position two miles east, and occupied works previously built by the Army of the Tennessee. On the 13th the brigade moved into positiith's house, eight miles from Acworth. 6th, remained in camp. 7th, marched through Acworth into camp, one mile south. 8th and 9th, remained in camp. On the 8th the Thirty-first Ohio was sent to Cartersville in charge of a supply train. On the 9th the Nineteenth Illinois Infantry was relieved from duty to be mustered out of service, the term of its enlistment having about expired. On the 10th the brigade was relieved from charge of trains and joined the division, taking a position in the l
mp. On the 8th the Thirty-first Ohio was sent to Cartersville in charge of a supply train. On the 9th the Nineteenth Illinois Infantry was relieved from duty to be mustered out of service, the term of its enlistment having about expired. On the 10th the brigade was relieved from charge of trains and joined the division, taking a position in the line of battle near Big Shanty. On the 11th moved forward to a position one mile west of Pine Hill; at dark changed position about one mile to the l of the town and west of the railroad. On the 4th moved about one-fourth of a mile, and took up a position in reserve. On the 5th moved to a position on the railroad ten miles from Atlanta. 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th, remained in position. On the 10th moved to Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee River. The Twenty-third Missouri Infantry here joined the brigade. On the 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th remained in camp. On the 15th Brigadier-General Turchin received a leave of absence on
bout expired. On the 10th the brigade was relieved from charge of trains and joined the division, taking a position in the line of battle near Big Shanty. On the 11th moved forward to a position one mile west of Pine Hill; at dark changed position about one mile to the left. The Eleventh Ohio relieved from garrison duty and orand 9th, remained in position. On the 10th moved to Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee River. The Twenty-third Missouri Infantry here joined the brigade. On the 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th remained in camp. On the 15th Brigadier-General Turchin received a leave of absence on account of sickness, and Col. M. B. Walkeallenged his right to hold them by a bold advance, and day after day and night after night, until the 11th, did we hold him in a deadly embrace. At 9 p. m. of the 11th we moved about three-fourths of a mile to the right and relieved a portion of General Morgan's division. This position we held until thenight oth e he nihh. Othe
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