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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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h opposition near Tunnel Hill, my brigade was detailed to act on the left next to Rocky Face. The Twenty-first Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers, supported by the brigade, formed in two lines. We drove the enemy, composed of Wheeler's cavalry, rapidly before us. The enemy formed on Tunnel Hill, but we continuing to advance, they rapidly retired, leaving us in possession of the works on the hill, which were of good strength, and whence a formidable resistance could have been made. On the 8th took position in front of Rocky Face and remained during the night. On the 9th deployed the Ninety-sixth Illinois and Eighty-fourth Indiana as skirmishers, who boldly advanced up the side of the mountain to the base of the cliff of Rocky Face, where the skirmishers effectively kept the enemy's skirmishers under cover on the top of the ridge. In the evening, by order, the Ninety-sixth Illinois and Eighty-fourth Indiana were marched by the right flank as skirmishers in the direction of Buzzar
o Rocky Face. The Twenty-first Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers, supported by the brigade, formed in two lines. We drove the enemy, composed of Wheeler's cavalry, rapidly before us. The enemy formed on Tunnel Hill, but we continuing to advance, they rapidly retired, leaving us in possession of the works on the hill, which were of good strength, and whence a formidable resistance could have been made. On the 8th took position in front of Rocky Face and remained during the night. On the 9th deployed the Ninety-sixth Illinois and Eighty-fourth Indiana as skirmishers, who boldly advanced up the side of the mountain to the base of the cliff of Rocky Face, where the skirmishers effectively kept the enemy's skirmishers under cover on the top of the ridge. In the evening, by order, the Ninety-sixth Illinois and Eighty-fourth Indiana were marched by the right flank as skirmishers in the direction of Buzzard Roost Gap to develop the enemy's position. Under a heavy fire of musketry, sh
luable officer. His loss was deeply felt. We remained in front of Rocky Face, engaged in skirmishing every day, until the 12th, when this brigade was moved to the right of the railroad, where it passes through Rocky Face Ridge. Here we intrenched, working night and day, in face of a most energetic and watchful foe, under heavy fire, and firmly maintained our position in pistol-shot range of the enemy's works until they evacuated them. They were of the most formidable character. On the 13th we pursued the rebels, and on the 14th, the First Brigade having the advance, they were found on the road from Dalton to Resaca, near the latter place. My brigade was sent forward to develop their position. Throwing out skirmishers, we advanced and drove the enemy before us until they took refuge behind their intrenchments. We continued to advance until within canister range of their works. Here my brigade threw up a temporary barricade, where my sharpshooters kept up a galling fire on th
st energetic and watchful foe, under heavy fire, and firmly maintained our position in pistol-shot range of the enemy's works until they evacuated them. They were of the most formidable character. On the 13th we pursued the rebels, and on the 14th, the First Brigade having the advance, they were found on the road from Dalton to Resaca, near the latter place. My brigade was sent forward to develop their position. Throwing out skirmishers, we advanced and drove the enemy before us until the with lumber revetments for artillery and riflemen. Keeping a heavy line of skirmishers forward, the enemy opened from Pine Mountain with artillery. Remained in this position, with severe skirmishing, the 12th, 13th, and 14th of June. On the 14th a shell from the Fifth Indiana Battery, commanded by Lieutenant Morrison, fired from a 3-inch Rodman gun, from the section commanded by Lieutenant Ellison, killed Lieutenant-General Polk of the rebel army, who, in company with Generals Johnston an
n of this battery for their gallantry and bravery on this occasion. The enemy's loss was reported by prisoners to be near 300 killed, with some 600 or 800 wounded. My loss was light. May the 15th my brigade was massed in column of regiments to support a portion of General Hooker's corps that assaulted and carried a part of the enemy's works in front of Resaca. At night we lay in the trenches which my pioneers had been engaged in constructing under heavy fire. Early next morning, the 16th, the enemy's works were found to be evacuated. We slowly pursued them, and, passing through Resaca, crossed the Oostenaula late in the evening. The One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colonel Moore commanding, was detailed, by order of General Thomas, to guard the works at Resaca. It was a very responsible position, and it has been well done. May 17, we moved slowly in the direction of and within three miles of Adairsville, the enemy slowly and stubbornly yielding. May 18, advanced thro
battle, and the Fifth Indiana Battery, with McDowell's and Bridges' batteries, or portions of them, opened fire upon the rebels with good effect. Our line of battle being formed and the skirmishers pressing them, the enemy withdrew his forces and retired behind his works at Cassville. During the night they evacuated this position. The 20th, 21st, and 22d we remained in position near Cassville, and on the 22d sent back to Bridgeport, Ala., all the surplus baggage of the brigade. On the 23d we crossed the Etowah and camped near Euharlee. On the 24th we passed Euharlee Creek and went into camp late at night in heavy rain at Burnt Hickory. On the 25th we continued in pursuit of the enemy, and passing Pumpkin Vine Creek were ordered to support General Hooker's corps, which had come up with and had a severe engagement with the rebels. These re-enforcements did not arrive any too soon, though night had intervened between the enemy and General Hooker's disordered troops. We went i
Bridges' batteries, or portions of them, opened fire upon the rebels with good effect. Our line of battle being formed and the skirmishers pressing them, the enemy withdrew his forces and retired behind his works at Cassville. During the night they evacuated this position. The 20th, 21st, and 22d we remained in position near Cassville, and on the 22d sent back to Bridgeport, Ala., all the surplus baggage of the brigade. On the 23d we crossed the Etowah and camped near Euharlee. On the 24th we passed Euharlee Creek and went into camp late at night in heavy rain at Burnt Hickory. On the 25th we continued in pursuit of the enemy, and passing Pumpkin Vine Creek were ordered to support General Hooker's corps, which had come up with and had a severe engagement with the rebels. These re-enforcements did not arrive any too soon, though night had intervened between the enemy and General Hooker's disordered troops. We went into line of battle at night and lay in this position. May 26
tle being formed and the skirmishers pressing them, the enemy withdrew his forces and retired behind his works at Cassville. During the night they evacuated this position. The 20th, 21st, and 22d we remained in position near Cassville, and on the 22d sent back to Bridgeport, Ala., all the surplus baggage of the brigade. On the 23d we crossed the Etowah and camped near Euharlee. On the 24th we passed Euharlee Creek and went into camp late at night in heavy rain at Burnt Hickory. On the 25th we continued in pursuit of the enemy, and passing Pumpkin Vine Creek were ordered to support General Hooker's corps, which had come up with and had a severe engagement with the rebels. These re-enforcements did not arrive any too soon, though night had intervened between the enemy and General Hooker's disordered troops. We went into line of battle at night and lay in this position. May 26, remained in this position. May 27, moved across Little Pumpkin Vine Creek near Brown's saw-mill, rel
No. 19. report of Brig. Gen. Walter C. Whitaker, U. S. Army, commanding Second brigade, of operations May 3-June 30. Hdqrs. Second Brig., First Div., 4TH Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., --, 1864. Sir: I submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade in the advance upon Atlanta; also a list of the killed, wounded, and missing: May the 3d the brigade-composed of the following regiments, Twenty-first Kentucky, Colonel Price; Ninety-sixth Illinois, Colonel Champion; Fortieth Ohio, Colonel Taylor; One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colonel Moore; Fifty-first Ohio, Colonel Mc-Clain; Ninety-ninth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Cummins commandin H. F. Temple, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. Blue Springs, Tenn., May 3, 1864. Inclosure no. 3. Report of killed, wounded, and missing of the Second brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, from May 3 to June 30, 1864. Zzz H. F. Temple, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.
n hurled such storms of shell, shot, and canister upon the rebel lines that they were enabled to maintain their position until General Hooker's command, advancing, aided them in turning back the rebel column, which was advancing far in rear of our left flank. I make special mention of the officers and men of this battery for their gallantry and bravery on this occasion. The enemy's loss was reported by prisoners to be near 300 killed, with some 600 or 800 wounded. My loss was light. May the 15th my brigade was massed in column of regiments to support a portion of General Hooker's corps that assaulted and carried a part of the enemy's works in front of Resaca. At night we lay in the trenches which my pioneers had been engaged in constructing under heavy fire. Early next morning, the 16th, the enemy's works were found to be evacuated. We slowly pursued them, and, passing through Resaca, crossed the Oostenaula late in the evening. The One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colon
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