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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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in the usual skirmishing with the enemy and driving his pickets with our skirmishers. During the night of 4th the enemy abandoned his ninth line of works and retreated toward the Chattahoochee River. Pursuit was made early in the morning of the 5th, my division leading the Fourth Corps, and such was the vigor of the pursuit on the road we followed that the portion of the enemy retreating by this road was driven across the river and so closely followed that he was unable to take up or destroyommanding general of the grand Military Division of the Mississippi announced the campaign terminated. But my division maintained its position in close proximity to the enemy, daily losing some men in the picket encounters, till Monday night, the 5th, when it was quietly and successfully withdrawn. By easy stages and unembarrassed by the enemy the division continued its march to this city, reaching here on the 8th instant. And here the division rests after the termination of the labors of th
and finally reached my headquarters about 8 p. m. The following morning the commanding general of the grand Military Division of the Mississippi announced the campaign terminated. But my division maintained its position in close proximity to the enemy, daily losing some men in the picket encounters, till Monday night, the 5th, when it was quietly and successfully withdrawn. By easy stages and unembarrassed by the enemy the division continued its march to this city, reaching here on the 8th instant. And here the division rests after the termination of the labors of the campaign. If the length of the campaign, commencing on the 3d of May and terminating on the 2d of September. with its ceaseless toil and labor, be considered; if the number and extent of its actual battles: and separate conflicts and the great number of days the troops were in the immediate presence of, and under a close fire from, the enemy be remembered; if the vast amount of labor expended in the constructio
by heavy intrenchments. The enemy held the northern entrance to the pass in force, and had the remainder of his troops disposed thence through the pass to Dalton, on the crest of the ridge, and on the roads passing east of the ridge to Dalton. The entire position, with its strong natural advantages, strengthened by defensive works, was impregnable against a direct attack. The demonstration commenced by the division on the 8th was continued throughout the day and almost continuously on the 9th, 10th, 11th, and to noon of the 12th, and although it was intended simply as a diversion, and was made with the skirmish line, a considerable number of casualties attested the vigor with which the demonstration against the rugged height was made. The impregnability of the enemy's position against a direct attack having become thoroughly patent, during the afternoon and night of the 11th a movement was commenced by all the forces in front of the enemy, less the Fourth Corps, to unite with th
tural advantages, strengthened by defensive works, was impregnable against a direct attack. The demonstration commenced by the division on the 8th was continued throughout the day and almost continuously on the 9th, 10th, 11th, and to noon of the 12th, and although it was intended simply as a diversion, and was made with the skirmish line, a considerable number of casualties attested the vigor with which the demonstration against the rugged height was made. The impregnability of the enemy's powas commenced by all the forces in front of the enemy, less the Fourth Corps, to unite with the Army of the Tennessee and pass to the south and rear of the enemy. Having discovered the withdrawal of our forces, the enemy, on the afternoon of the 12th, commenced a counter movement, the object of which was to turn our extreme left, then held by the cavalry, under General Stoneman, and the Second Division, of the Fourth Corps (General Newton). The movement was early discovered by the signal offic
fficer. During the night of the 15th the enemy evacuated the position in and around Resaca and retreated south of the Oostenaula. This was the second strong position from which the enemy had been forced. The many small-arms and other articles of military use abandoned showed that his retreat was precipitate. The casualties of the command from the opening of the campaign to the evacuation of Resaca were: Killed, 81; wounded, 348; total, 429. Pursuit was made early the morning of the 16th, and during the day the whole of the Fourth Corps passed the Oostenaula (having repaired for this purpose a part of the partially destroyed bridge), and encamped for the night near Calhoun. The pursuit was resumed early the morning of the 17th. My division moved along the railway. Throughout the march a continued skirmish was kept up with the parties covering the enemy's rear, but these were rapidly driven before the steady and solid advance of the skirmish line of the division. At Adair
across the creek with a view to forcing a passage the following morning, but during the night the enemy retreated. The position in the vicinity of Adairsville is not naturally very strong, but it was very well intrenched, and was the third fortified position abandoned by the enemy. Pursuit was made the following morning (the 18th), my division leading. A light opposition was made to our advance by light parties of cavalry, but these were readily scattered. The pursuit was continued on the 19th, the First Division of the corps leading, followed by my division. The line of march lay through Kingston, and immediately south of this village the enemy was overtaken in force, apparently arrayed for battle. The First Division of the corps was at once deployed into order of battle across the road by which we were marching, and my division deployed on its right. Batteries were posted in eligible positions to play on the lines of the enemy displayed in the open fields in our front. The ar
lored ground. The Seventeenth Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers to cover the advance of its brigade, and suffered quite severely in the advance late in the afternoon, more than 20 casualties in the skirmish line bearing unmistakable evidence of the sharp fire to which it had been exposed. During the night of the 19th the enemy evacuated his works in the vicinity of Cassville, being the fourth intrenched position abandoned, and retired across the Etowah. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, the 20th, 21st, and 22d of May, the troops rested quietly in camp, but it was a busy period for commanding generals and staff officers preparing for the grand flank movement for turning the enemy's position at the railway gap in the Allatoona Hills. Taking twenty days subsistence in wagons, the entire army defiantly cut loose from its line of communication, crossed the Etowah River, and pushed boldly southward through a most abrupt and difficult range of hills. The movement was commenced on Monday,
scovered. No suspicion of our designs or the nature of our movements seems to have reached him. The movement was continued nearly all night, when the troops were allowed to rest till daylight and to get their breakfast. About 7 a. m. Friday, the 26th, our pickets reported some movement among the enemy, which was supposed might indicate an intention to attack, but it resulted in nothing important. At 8 a. m. our movement was continued and kept up throughout the day. Saturday, the 27th, the movm us — the name of Maj. James B. Hampson, One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteers. Preparatory to the attack which was to be made on the 27th of May, it had been ordered that all the guns should be placed in position during the night of the 26th, and open on the enemy's works the next morning. One of my batteries was slow in opening, and I ordered Major Hampson to go to the battery and hasten the work of preparation. While so employed the fatal shot of the sharpshooter was sped on its m
e 26th having satisfactorily defined the position of the enemy's intrenched line, it was determined on Friday morning, the 27th, that it should be assaulted, and my division was selected for this arduous and dangerous task. A minute and critical exabut it resulted in nothing important. At 8 a. m. our movement was continued and kept up throughout the day. Saturday, the 27th, the movement was resumed, and the troops moved steadily around the enemy's left toward his rear. Sunday, the 28th, the War Dallas, Ga., May 30, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to submit report of casualties in this command in action of 27th instant: Zzz Some of those reported missing may yet return, but it is probable that by far the larger part were eithereneral commanding desires to express to the division his high appreciation of their good conduct in the battles of the 27th ultimo, and to thank the officers and soldiers for their heroism displayed on that occasion. Ordered to assault a strongly i
attack, but it resulted in nothing important. At 8 a. m. our movement was continued and kept up throughout the day. Saturday, the 27th, the movement was resumed, and the troops moved steadily around the enemy's left toward his rear. Sunday, the 28th, the West Point railway was reached. Monday, the 29th, my division was engaged in destroying the West Point road. Tuesday, the 30th, the movement was resumed to reach the Macon railway. It was considered certain that the destruction of this las Third Brigades were finally compelled to abandon the pits they had carried by a combined front and flank attack, but not a single foot of ground held before the advance yesterday afternoon was lost. The advance of last week (on Thursday, the 28th ultimo), in which we carried the enemy's entire line of skirmish pits in our front, and captured a good many prisoners, compelled him to establish his line of skirmish pits so near his main line as to make it nearly as difficult in some places to car
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