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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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uld not be compressed into narrower limits without doing injustice to the division whose services it is designed to commemorate. The reports of brigade and regimental commanders are herewith transmitted. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, th. J. Wood, Brigadier-General of Volunteers. Lieut. Col. J. S. Fullerton, Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourth Army Corps. Statement of casualties showing losses in Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, during the months of May, June, July, August, and September, 1864. Zzz In addition to the above, the following casualties occurred in the artillery battalion of my command: One commissioned officer killed, 4 enlisted men killed, 17 wounded, and 4 missing, making an aggregate of 2,792 killed, wounded, and missing in the entire command during the campaign. I visited the battle-field of Pickett's Mills, or New Hope Church, twice after the evacuation of the enemy, and examined it closely. The numerous single graves and s
day night the enemy evacuated his seventh intrenched position and retired to his works around Kenesaw Mountain. Sunday morning the pursuit was renewed and the enemy pressed in on his works. Here the division remained from Sunday, June 19, to Sunday, July 3. Sharp skirmishing was kept up during the whole of this time, and the period was also enlivened with some brilliant affairs and other more serious operations. Some of these affairs are worthy of special mention. Late Monday afternoon, Juneek in front of Kenesaw Mountain, and brought us to Saturday night, July 2. On that night the enemy evacuated his position around Kenesaw Mountain, being the eighth strong line of works abandoned, and retreated south of Marietta. Sunday morning, July 3, saw a renewal of the pursuit. Passing through Marietta, the enemy was found again strongly intrenched some five miles south of the town. July 4 was passed in the usual skirmishing with the enemy and driving his pickets with our skirmishers. D
in the usual skirmishing with the enemy and driving his pickets with our skirmishers. During the night of 4th the enemy abandoned his ninth line of works and retreated toward the Chattahoochee River. Pursuit was made early in the morning of the 5th, my division leading the Fourth Corps, and such was the vigor of the pursuit on the road we followed that the portion of the enemy retreating by this road was driven across the river and so closely followed that he was unable to take up or destroyommanding general of the grand Military Division of the Mississippi announced the campaign terminated. But my division maintained its position in close proximity to the enemy, daily losing some men in the picket encounters, till Monday night, the 5th, when it was quietly and successfully withdrawn. By easy stages and unembarrassed by the enemy the division continued its march to this city, reaching here on the 8th instant. And here the division rests after the termination of the labors of th
; but it could not be compressed into narrower limits without doing injustice to the division whose services it is designed to commemorate. The reports of brigade and regimental commanders are herewith transmitted. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, th. J. Wood, Brigadier-General of Volunteers. Lieut. Col. J. S. Fullerton, Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourth Army Corps. Statement of casualties showing losses in Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, during the months of May, June, July, August, and September, 1864. Zzz In addition to the above, the following casualties occurred in the artillery battalion of my command: One commissioned officer killed, 4 enlisted men killed, 17 wounded, and 4 missing, making an aggregate of 2,792 killed, wounded, and missing in the entire command during the campaign. I visited the battle-field of Pickett's Mills, or New Hope Church, twice after the evacuation of the enemy, and examined it closely. The numerous single
r 10, 1864. Sir: The opening of the grand campaigns in the spring of 1864 witnessed a new phase in our military combinations. Previously dispersion of our troops, and of course of our efforts, had-been the order of the day; for the campaigns of the spring and summer of 1864 concentration of our troops had been wisely resolved on. In conformity with this principle of concentration large masses of troops were concentrated in and near the northwestern angle of Georgia in the latter part of April for the summer campaign into this State. The division which I have the honor to command, being the Third Division, of the Fourth Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, constituted a part of the troops so assembled, and it is the object of this report to present a faithful history of the part it bore in the grand campaign, which, extending over the long term of four months of continued effort and struggle, finally resulted most gloriously to our arms in the capture of Atlanta. At 12 m. on t
the Forty-ninth Ohio, moving forward to the right, carried and intrenched another important position still farther in advance. This brilliant success cost the two regiments quite heavily; but it was useful in enabling us to swing up our lines to the right and circumscribing the enemy to a narrower limit of action. The remainder of this week was passed in pressing the enemy's outposts on his main lines; affairs which, estimated by their casualties, rose to the dignity of battles. On the 27th of June the Second Division, of the Fourth Corps, was ordered to assault the enemy's intrenchments, and two brigades of my division were ordered to be in readiness to support the assaulting column and follow up any success that might be gained. Unfortunately, the attack was not successful, and as a consequence no part of my division was engaged. Constant skirmishing wore away the second week in front of Kenesaw Mountain, and brought us to Saturday night, July 2. On that night the enemy evacua
August 14th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 57
nt: Zzz Some of those reported missing may yet return, but it is probable that by far the larger part were either killed or wounded and fell into [the] hands of the enemy when the position gained by the attack was abandoned in the night. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, th. J. Wood, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding. Lieut. Col. J. S. Fullerton, Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourth Army Corps. Hdqrs. Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 14, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to forward for the information of the corps and department commanders the reports of my brigade commanders of the advance of yesterday afternoon: Proper preparations having been made by strengthening the picket-line and ordering out a regiment from the main line of each brigade as a support, at the proper moment the whole moved forward handsomely together. The skirmishers of the Second and Third Brigades quickly carried the enemy's skirmish pits, and
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