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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 77
rders to march, and about 12 m. I moved with the brigade about a mile, when we came up with the enemy's skirmishers. We formed with the brigade, the regiment in the front line, and put up works under the fire of the enemy's skirmishers, having 2 men wounded. During the night the enemy evacuated his position, leaving formidable works. On the morning of the 5th I received orders to march, and at 6 o'clock we moved with the brigade to within a few hundred yards of Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee River, the enemy retreating across the river. We went into camp and remained inactive until about 2 p. m. the 8th of July, when, by order of Colonel Knefler, we moved about one mile to the right of the brigade, and went into camp, throwing up a line of works, a few rebels being seen in our front. On the morning of the 9th the regiment went on picket, no. enemy being seen in our front. On the morning of the 10th the regiment was withdrawn from picket, and orders issued to be in readiness
Richard W. Johnson (search for this): chapter 77
ting the enemy. On the 25th we lay in camp. On the 26th the regiment moved with the brigade to the right, and formed in the rear and support of General Newton's division, while it made an assault on the enemy'stworks. The assault being unsuccessful we moved back to camp, by Colonel Knefier's order. Nothing unusual occurred until the night of the 2d of July, when I received orders to move, and at dark moved with the brigade about three-quarters of a mile to the left, and relieved part of Johnson's division. Our line was so close to the enemy that no pickets could be put out to cover the left of the regiment. The men were obliged to fire from the works, as also did the enemy. About 3 a. m. the 3d of July I received an ordersfrom Colonel Knefler to move a line of skirmishers cautiously toward the enemy's works, which I did, and found them empty, the enemy having left them during the night. About 7 o'clock I received orders to march, and about 8 o'clock moved out of camp and march
C. F. Manderson (search for this): chapter 77
ome 150 yards to the rear. The enemy was surprised. We drove him from his position with some loss, capturing Lieutenant-Colonel Hale, Second (rebel) Tennessee, and 40 of his men and officers, with but slight loss to ourselves. We advanced to the road, fired a few volleys at the enemy, who retreated, leaving his position in our possession. I placed the Seventy-ninth Indiana in position, its left on the road and its right extended toward the river; the Ninth Kentucky along the road. Colonel Manderson, with the Nineteenth Ohio Infantry, reported to me and was placed in reserve, ready to act on either flank, three companies of his regiment being thrown to the right and front of the Seventy-ninth Indiana, where the enemy threatened. The enemy got a battery of artillery in position bearing on us, without, however, doing much injury, it soon being silenced by a section of Bradley's battery, which enfiladed it from the opposite side of the river. The enemy, recovering from his surprise
Frederick Knefier (search for this): chapter 77
y, Atlanta, Ga., September 14, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to present my report, from the time I rejoined the regiment. I found the regiment in camp with the brigade in front of Kenesaw Mountain, confronting the enemy. On the 25th we lay in camp. On the 26th the regiment moved with the brigade to the right, and formed in the rear and support of General Newton's division, while it made an assault on the enemy'stworks. The assault being unsuccessful we moved back to camp, by Colonel Knefier's order. Nothing unusual occurred until the night of the 2d of July, when I received orders to move, and at dark moved with the brigade about three-quarters of a mile to the left, and relieved part of Johnson's division. Our line was so close to the enemy that no pickets could be put out to cover the left of the regiment. The men were obliged to fire from the works, as also did the enemy. About 3 a. m. the 3d of July I received an ordersfrom Colonel Knefler to move a line of skirmis
William Grose (search for this): chapter 77
y, with skirmishers deployed to the front. We moved forward about three-quarters of a mile, and, on ascending a high ridge, I discovered the enemy in position in front of us on a ridge about 400 yards distant. I received orders to wait until General Grose's brigade, of Stanley's division, could be placed in position on our left, and then move forward as it moved, and assault the enemy's works. We waited about a half hour, and when General Grose's line advanced I gave the order to both regimenGeneral Grose's line advanced I gave the order to both regiments to move forward. The regiments were obliged to pass through a dense thicket of wild plums for about seventy-five yards, and after passing through the thicket I was obliged to halt and reform the Ninth Kentucky under fire, when the line again moved forward at a charge. When within about 250 yards of the enemy's works we were obliged to pass through a woods, in which the timber and undergrowth was cut down, which formed such a dense tangle I found it difficult to get through. The enemy's ri
Frederick Knefler (search for this): chapter 77
. the 3d of July I received an ordersfrom Colonel Knefler to move a line of skirmishers cautiously of Marietta, when I received orders from Colonel Knefler to halt until the train of our corps (Fou. the 8th of July, when, by order of Colonel Knefler, we moved about one mile to the right of the inactive until July 17, when, by order of Colonel Knefler, we moved down the river to within a milerawn from picket and ordered to march, by Colonel Knefler, without tents or knapsacks. About 7 o'cnce of Peach Tree Creek I was directed by Colonel Knefler to take the Seventy-ninth Indiana and my could be seen distinctly. I reported to Colonel Knefler and was ordered to hold the position. Oud. About 6 o'clock I received orders from Colonel Knefler to take the Seventyninth Indiana and my oAbout 4 p. m. of July 28 I was ordered by Colonel Knefler to take my regiment and the Seventy-ninthve until August 16, when I was ordered by Colonel Knefler to take my own regiment and the Seventy-n
John Newton (search for this): chapter 77
tain, confronting the enemy. On the 25th we lay in camp. On the 26th the regiment moved with the brigade to the right, and formed in the rear and support of General Newton's division, while it made an assault on the enemy'stworks. The assault being unsuccessful we moved back to camp, by Colonel Knefier's order. Nothing unusualbout 5 p. m. I received orders to take the Ninth Kentucky and Seventy-ninth Indiana and cross Creek, and make a reconnaissance of the ground to be occupied by General Newton's division. Moved out the road about a mile and a half and found no enemy. I was relieved about 8 p. m. by a regiment from Newton's division, .and received Newton's division, .and received orders to return to camp, and did so by 9 o'clock that night. We were under marching orders on the morning of August 28, and about 5 p. m. I was ordered to escort a part of the train of the corps. We moved forward toward the Montgomery railroad, and within about half a mile of it, and went into camp for the rest of the night. T
John G. Dunbar (search for this): chapter 77
or Gemmer, succeeded in throwing a bridge across the creek at two points, about 100 yards apart. The crossing of the creek was effected under fire of the enemy's skirmishers, with but little loss. The space between the creek and the enemy was a corn-field, about 300 yards across. I had just made the disposition to advance when Major Parker, Seventy-ninth Indiana, commanding the skirmishers,was, unfortunately, wounded by a sharpshooter, thus delaying the advance some minutes. I placed Captain Dunbar, Seventy-ninth Indiana, in command of the skirmishers, and ordered him forward, I following with the regiments some 150 yards to the rear. The enemy was surprised. We drove him from his position with some loss, capturing Lieutenant-Colonel Hale, Second (rebel) Tennessee, and 40 of his men and officers, with but slight loss to ourselves. We advanced to the road, fired a few volleys at the enemy, who retreated, leaving his position in our possession. I placed the Seventy-ninth Indiana
George H. Cram (search for this): chapter 77
No. 73. report of Col. George H. Cram, Ninth Kentucky Infantry, of operations June 26-September 8. headquarters Ninth Kentucky Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 14, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to present my report, from the time I rejoined the regiment. I found the regiment in camp with the brigade in front of Kenesaw Mountain, confronting the enemy. On the 25th we lay in camp. On the 26th the regiment moved with the brigade to the right, and formed in the rear and support of General Newton's division, while it made an assault on the enemy'stworks. The assault being unsuccessful we moved back to camp, by Colonel Knefier's order. Nothing unusual occurred until the night of the 2d of July, when I received orders to move, and at dark moved with the brigade about three-quarters of a mile to the left, and relieved part of Johnson's division. Our line was so close to the enemy that no pickets could be put out to cover the left of the regiment. The men were obliged t
William B. Hazen (search for this): chapter 77
ection of Bradley's battery, which enfiladed it from the opposite side of the river. The enemy, recovering from his surprise, got into position in front of the Seventy-ninth Indiana, and we hastily threw up works. The skirmishers attacked furiously, and I became apprehensive that he would attack in force, when the balance of the brigade arrived and formed on the right of the Seventy-ninth Indiana, making our position secure. We remained here until about 7 o'clock, when we were relieved by Hazen's brigade and ordered back to our camp at Buck Head where we arrived at 10 p. m. On the morning of the 20th I received marching orders, and moved with the brigade to the left, taking the Decatur road about three miles, turned to the right toward and went into position facing Atlanta, on the right of Stanley's division. On the morning of the 21st received orders to march, and moved to the right and into line, when we threw up a line of works on a ridge completely commanded by the enemy's
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