hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 1,463 127 Browse Search
John Newton 1,193 3 Browse Search
David S. Stanley 1,012 8 Browse Search
Thomas J. Wood 1,007 3 Browse Search
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) 693 51 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 681 9 Browse Search
J. M. Schofield 592 2 Browse Search
Resaca (Georgia, United States) 570 16 Browse Search
Marietta (Georgia, United States) 445 19 Browse Search
Oliver O. Howard 437 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

Found 53 total hits in 25 results.

1 2 3
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 83
fle-pits upon a small ridge in front of Rocky Face Ridge, which the troops of Davis' division charged immediately afterward and took without loss. During the remainder of the operations in front of Rocky Face Ridge and the pursuit of Johnston to Resaca both batteries were more or less engaged daily. On Saturday, the 14th, after our line had advanced to within a short distance of the enemy's works, a section of Battery B, Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, was placed in position in front of a 4-f a single straggler or a skulker from either battery, and do not think there was one. Lieut. A. Morrison deserves special mention for conspicuous gallantry upon all occasions, and especially for the great service which he did with his command at Resaca on the evening of the 14th ultimo. Captain McDowell handles his battery well, and proved himself a good soldier on more than one occasion during this campaign. Lieut. G. H. Briggs, of the Fifth Indiana, fully sustained his former reputation for
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 83
ammunition used at this place. The enemy made several feints of attacks on this battery, which caused a large amount of canister to be used. The Fifth Indiana on the following day was placed in the line in Grose's brigade, at a point about 350 yards from the enemy's breastworks. Some firing was done in this position during this day. On the following day Spencer's battery, of the Second Division, was ordered to report to me, and was placed in the position previously occupied by Bridges' (Illinois) Battery. The works of the battery were deepened and strengthened, when an endeavor was made to obtain a cross-fire by using it and the Fifth Indiana Battery upon a part of the enemy's works, which was enfiladed by the fire of this battery. This instantly caused a number of pieces of the enemy to concentrate their fire on Spencer, who answered in so effectual a manner as to cause the enemy's guns to cease firing, after which both batteries proceeded without interruption with the original
Catoosa Springs (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 83
No. 79. report of Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery, Chief of artillery, First Division, of operations May 3-June 9. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourth Army Corps, In the Field, near , Ga., June 9, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the batteries of my command from May 3 up to the present date: The batteries marched with the division by Red Clay, Catoosa Springs, to Tunnel Hill, upon which the enemy appeared to be posted in considerable force. To drive the enemy from this position a strong demonstration by our troops was made, and with whom I sent four guns of the Fifth Indiana Battery, while the real attack was made by securing a lodgment for a brigade and two guns from the same battery. This section advanced down the ridge with the brigade, and assisted in the movement by firing about fifteen rounds of ammunition. On the following day (the 8th ultimo) the Fifth Indiana Battery was engaged in shelling a line of r
Rocky Face Ridge (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 83
e ridge with the brigade, and assisted in the movement by firing about fifteen rounds of ammunition. On the following day (the 8th ultimo) the Fifth Indiana Battery was engaged in shelling a line of rifle-pits upon a small ridge in front of Rocky Face Ridge, which the troops of Davis' division charged immediately afterward and took without loss. During the remainder of the operations in front of Rocky Face Ridge and the pursuit of Johnston to Resaca both batteries were more or less engaged daiRocky Face Ridge and the pursuit of Johnston to Resaca both batteries were more or less engaged daily. On Saturday, the 14th, after our line had advanced to within a short distance of the enemy's works, a section of Battery B, Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, was placed in position in front of a 4-gun rebel battery and a hill to the left occupied by the enemy's infantry. The section only fired a few rounds, as they were entirely unprotected,--while all the troops of the enemy were under cover. General Stanley, receiving information that the enemy was massing his troops on our left, direct
Cassville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 83
e of the batteries was very embarrassing to the enemy. During the night a feint of an attack was made by the enemy, during which both batteries opened fire again. The batteries advanced after the battle with the division until it arrived near Cassville, where the enemy showed themselves in considerable force. The batteries were placed in position at the edge of a large field in which the enemy was posted. Both batteries fired at the enemy's lines in this position for about an hour, when they advanced in line with the division to the front of the enemy's works behind Cassville, where Battery B, being placed in a good position, opened heavily on the enemy, cross-firing with some of General Hooker's batteries that had come in from another direction. The batteries without further engagement advanced with the corps to our line of battle in front of the enemy at New Hope Church. B was first placed in position by being sunk within about 300 yards of the enemy's works. This position w
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 83
No. 79. report of Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery, Chief of artillery, First Division, of operations May 3-June 9. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourth Army Corps, In the Field, near , Ga., June 9, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the batteries of my command from May 3 up to the present date: The batteries marched with the division by Red Clay, Catoosa Springs, to Tunnel Hill, upon which the enemy appeared to be posted in considerable force. To drive the enemy from this position a strong demonstration by our troops was made, and with whom I sent four guns of the Fifth Indiana Battery, while the real attack was made by securing a lodgment for a brigade and two guns from the same battery. This section advanced down the ridge with the brigade, and assisted in the movement by firing about fifteen rounds of ammunition. On the following day (the 8th ultimo) the Fifth Indiana Battery was engaged in shelling a line of r
Tunnel Hill (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 83
No. 79. report of Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery, Chief of artillery, First Division, of operations May 3-June 9. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourth Army Corps, In the Field, near , Ga., June 9, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the batteries of my command from May 3 up to the present date: The batteries marched with the division by Red Clay, Catoosa Springs, to Tunnel Hill, upon which the enemy appeared to be posted in considerable force. To drive the enemy from this position a strong demonstration by our troops was made, and with whom I sent four guns of the Fifth Indiana Battery, while the real attack was made by securing a lodgment for a brigade and two guns from the same battery. This section advanced down the ridge with the brigade, and assisted in the movement by firing about fifteen rounds of ammunition. On the following day (the 8th ultimo) the Fifth Indiana Battery was engaged in shelling a line of r
Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 83
the pieces. They made one more endeavor to get over the hill more to our left, but were met in this attack at first by the fire of the battery with canister, and as they turned, by a volley from Robinson's brigade, of Williams' division, of General Hooker's corps, and who immediately charged and drove them clear over the hill out of sight in great confusion. On the following day (Sunday, the 15th) Battery B was placed in position within 400 yards of the enemy's rifle-pits, and partially enfilines in this position for about an hour, when they advanced in line with the division to the front of the enemy's works behind Cassville, where Battery B, being placed in a good position, opened heavily on the enemy, cross-firing with some of General Hooker's batteries that had come in from another direction. The batteries without further engagement advanced with the corps to our line of battle in front of the enemy at New Hope Church. B was first placed in position by being sunk within about
William Grose (search for this): chapter 83
t advanced with the corps to our line of battle in front of the enemy at New Hope Church. B was first placed in position by being sunk within about 300 yards of the enemy's works. This position was so close to the enemy as to be very hot, which probably accounts for the large amount of ammunition used at this place. The enemy made several feints of attacks on this battery, which caused a large amount of canister to be used. The Fifth Indiana on the following day was placed in the line in Grose's brigade, at a point about 350 yards from the enemy's breastworks. Some firing was done in this position during this day. On the following day Spencer's battery, of the Second Division, was ordered to report to me, and was placed in the position previously occupied by Bridges' (Illinois) Battery. The works of the battery were deepened and strengthened, when an endeavor was made to obtain a cross-fire by using it and the Fifth Indiana Battery upon a part of the enemy's works, which was enf
William D. Williams (search for this): chapter 83
hed the road at the foot of the hill, within fifty yards of the battery, but the main body appeared to be greatly disconcerted by the firing, and although their officers could be seen and heard trying to urge them forward, they very quickly put the hill between themselves and the pieces. They made one more endeavor to get over the hill more to our left, but were met in this attack at first by the fire of the battery with canister, and as they turned, by a volley from Robinson's brigade, of Williams' division, of General Hooker's corps, and who immediately charged and drove them clear over the hill out of sight in great confusion. On the following day (Sunday, the 15th) Battery B was placed in position within 400 yards of the enemy's rifle-pits, and partially enfilading them, where a constant fire of canister, spherical case, and shell was kept up. The Fifth Indiana was placed to the left of the other, and so as to make a cross-fire. From appearances the next day, it is believed that
1 2 3