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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Camp Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
fter daylight the next morning. On the 27th the corps remained in camp, awaiting the movements of other commands, cutting roads, &c., preparatory to marching the next morning. At 4 a. m. the 28th the corps moved to Mount Gilead Church, where it passed the Fourth Corps, and taking the advance reached its designated camp near Rough and Ready late in the afternoon. During the day's march Morgan's division had the advance, and skirmished quite lively with the enemy's cavalry at and south of Camp Creek. On the 29th the location of my camp remained unchanged; a part of the troops were kept vigorously at work during the day, destroying the railroad track, making reconnaissances, and cutting roads to facilitate our advance the next morning. On the morning of the 30th, in compliance with instructions from Major-General Thomas, the corps moved at an early hour to Shoal Creek Church, on the neighborhood road, where it bivouacked for a few hours, the troops getting their dinners during the ha
Chambers Mill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
ht be in advance of mine. To advance beyond the ridge now held by Edie's brigade involved a general engagement, or a retreat of the enemy, and I determined, therefore, to push forward my troops to that point in column, aad deploy for action. Resuming the advance, Carlin was ordered to rove forward with the remainder of his division, and to form on the left of his Second Brigade, already in position. Morgan was ordered to move rapidly by the main road, and, after crossing the creek at Chambers' Mill, to move to the left and take position on Carlin's right on the ridge — in taking position, to be guarded by the natural advantages of the ground. Baird moving forward, closed upon Carlin's left in reserve. These movements were promptly executed, notwithstanding the rough nature of the ground and the fire of artillery from the enemy's works, to which Morgan's division was frequently subjected. By this time Prescott's battery had taken a good position on the ridge, and opened an exceed
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
No. 89. reports of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 22-September 8. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, White Hall, Ga., September 28, 1864. Capt. R. H. Ramsey, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Cumberland: Captain: I have the honor herewith to transmit my official report of the operations of this corps during that portion of the campaign in Georgia since I have been in command. It is accompanied by complete list of casualties, by name, from each regiment and battery, and the official reports of each division, brigade, and regimental commander, except the regimental reports of the Second and Third Brigades, of the Third Division, from which no reports have been received. I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, &c., Jef. C. Davis, Brevet Major-General, Commanding. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, White Hall, Ga., September--, 1864. General: I have the
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
e that the two corps should move in co-operating distance toward Jonesborough. I immediately put the column in motion in the following order:ed to him, and he ordered me to move forward in the direction of Jonesborough, expressing at the time some apprehensions that General Stanley'Carlin's division, here joined its division. Going into camp at Jonesborough awaiting orders, it remained in reserve during the intervening dents of the troops in the return to that place, it withdrew from Jonesborough and marched to Rough and Ready and went into camp. On the morniForming a junction at this point, the corps moved south upon the Jonesborough road, General Carlin in advance, followed by General Morgan and pon their right. General Morgan's division moved south upon the Jonesborough road, formed his lines to the east of the road and to the east otinued. Zzz Jef. C. Davis, Brevet Major-General, Commanding. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., September 3, 1864.
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
urteenth Army Corps from the 22d of August, on which day I assumed command of it, to the 8th of September, when it went into camp at this place: At the time of assuming command the position of the corps was located on Utoy Creek, and west of Atlanta, and nearly opposite East Point. It was and had been for some days detached from the Army of the Cumberland and was acting under the immediate direction of Major-General Schofield, commanding the Army of the Ohio, in our movements against the eg into camp at Jonesborough awaiting orders, it remained in reserve during the intervening days of active operations of the troops near Lovejoy's Station until the morning of the 7th, when, in compliance with orders announcing the evacuation of Atlanta, and directing the movements of the troops in the return to that place, it withdrew from Jonesborough and marched to Rough and Ready and went into camp. On the morning of the 8th marched and went into permanent camp at this place, thus ending t
Flint (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
this road the pickets of the Seventeenth Corps were found. One brigade of General Carlin's division was immediately pushed eastward on a reconnaissance. They advanced a mile, driving in the enemy's skirmishers and gaining possession of a ridge in their front with but small loss. The other brigade of this division was pushed forward and formed upon their right. General Morgan's division moved south upon the Jonesborough road, formed his lines to the east of the road and to the east of Flint River (which General Carlin had also crossed), and advancing began to feel for General Carlin's right. Meanwhile Captain Prescott's battery gained a commanding position, enfilading the enemy's lines and silencing a battery upon General Morgan's front. Connection was formed between General Morgan and General Carlin, and the lines of battle were formed. The lines of attack consisted of Carlin's two brigades and Morgan's entire division. The enemy was vigorously attacked and driven back severa
Ready (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
of General Morgan's division, was ordered to make a reconnaissance in the direction of the Macon railroad. The road was reached and a party kept at work destroying the track until the following day. Baird intrenched his command on the Rough and Ready road, near Smith's house, where it remained until joined by the corps the next day. Carlin's division moved in the morning to Renfroe's Cross-Roads, for the purpose of guarding the different trains collecting at that place. Late in the evening t to move with Morgan's division and two brigades of Carlin's and join with Baird's, and then to move in support of General Howard's left. Leaving one brigade at Renfroe's to guard the trains, as directed, Carlin marched promptly to the Rough and Ready road and halted his command a short distance in advance of Baird's field-works on the right. Morgan, with two brigades, marched promptly from Renfroe's, and, following Carlin, reported to me at General Baird's headquarters, where, in compliance
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
the Rough and Ready road, near Smith's house, where it remained until joined by the corps the next day. Carlin's division moved in the morning to Renfroe's Cross-Roads, for the purpose of guarding the different trains collecting at that place. Late in the evening this division was hurriedly ordered to the support of the Army of the Tennessee, then reported to be engaged with the enemy, and Morgan's division was ordered to take its place at Renfroe's and to picket well to the front on the Fayetteville road; this he did. The emergency for which Carlin's division had been called to the support of General Howard's troops ceased to exist, the enemy having been repulsed, and the fact being reported to me, I ordered Carlin to return to his camp of the previous night. On the morning of the 1st of September I received orders from department headquarters to move with Morgan's division and two brigades of Carlin's and join with Baird's, and then to move in support of General Howard's left. Lea
Whitehall (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
No. 89. reports of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 22-September 8. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, White Hall, Ga., September 28, 1864. Capt. R. H. Ramsey, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Cumberland: Captain: I have the honor herewith to transmit my official report of the operations of this corps during that portion of the campaign in Georgia since I have been in command. It is accompanied by completees, of the Third Division, from which no reports have been received. I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, &c., Jef. C. Davis, Brevet Major-General, Commanding. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, White Hall, Ga., September--, 1864. General: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Fourteenth Army Corps from the 22d of August, on which day I assumed command of it, to the 8th of September, when it went into camp at t
Rough-hew Ridge (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 93
ne brigade of General Morgan's division, was ordered to make a reconnaissance in the direction of the Macon railroad. The road was reached and a party kept at work destroying the track until the following day. Baird intrenched his command on the Rough and Ready road, near Smith's house, where it remained until joined by the corps the next day. Carlin's division moved in the morning to Renfroe's Cross-Roads, for the purpose of guarding the different trains collecting at that place. Late in theadquarters to move with Morgan's division and two brigades of Carlin's and join with Baird's, and then to move in support of General Howard's left. Leaving one brigade at Renfroe's to guard the trains, as directed, Carlin marched promptly to the Rough and Ready road and halted his command a short distance in advance of Baird's field-works on the right. Morgan, with two brigades, marched promptly from Renfroe's, and, following Carlin, reported to me at General Baird's headquarters, where, in c
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