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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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nes and strengthening their position. August 3, was relieved by Twentieth Corps and transferred to the right of Army of the Tennessee. August 4, King's brigade made a reconnaissance to the right and returned. August 5, moved out to the Sandtown road, thence to the left, and came up in rear of Davis' division, forming the reserve of the line. Late in the evening made a reconnaissance to the right to find the flank of the rebel lines, which was undertaken too late to accomplish much. On the 6th relieved General Hascall's division, which was moved to the right to join its proper corps. August 7, was ordered to assume command of the Fourteenth Army Corps, by virtue of seniority. In this hurried report I am unable to do the troops justice. When the campaign ends will forward a list of those whose good conduct deserves special mention. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding. Capt. A. C. McCLURG, Asst. Adjt. G
ments, the Nineteenth Illinois Infantry and Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry, at Parker's Gap, to hold that pass until the advance of the troops from the direction of Cleveland should cover it. On the day but one following, these regiments having been relieved, were transferred to the brigade of General Turchin, in the Third Division. The 4th, 5th, and 6th of May was spent in bivouac near Ringgold, waiting the concentration of the army and completing our preparations for the campaign. On the 7th, leaving all transportation, save the ambulances and ordnance trains, I marched at daylight in rear of General Davis' division, by the main Ringgold and Dalton road, in the direction of Tunnel Hill, near Terrell's house. By direction of the major-general commanding corps, I filed to the right and formed my division, with two brigades on the line and one in reserve, on the right of General Davis' division, my right brigade (General Carlin's) resting across the East Chickamauga, but in good co
ever, to keep an eye upon the bridge, and to cross at once and notify me in case there should be indications of a rise in the stream sufficient to carry them away. The night passed, however, without the anticipated disaster. At 3.40 p. m. of the 11th, in pursuance of orders received from the major-general commanding corps, I sent off my wagon train, with the other trains of the corps, toward Snake Creek Gap, to which place, on the 12th, I marched with my division, following that of Brigadier-Gadier-General Baird's division, whose skirmishers had already found the enemy. My skirmishers were thrown out to connect with those of General Baird's line, but we remained in that position all night without any indications of the enemy. On the 11th, under the direction of the major-general commanding corps, I moved my troops about one division front to the left, forming in two lines along the crest of a wooded ridge, my center resting just in rear of Whitfield's house. With great difficulty
ment should be postponed until morning, directing Carlin, however, to keep an eye upon the bridge, and to cross at once and notify me in case there should be indications of a rise in the stream sufficient to carry them away. The night passed, however, without the anticipated disaster. At 3.40 p. m. of the 11th, in pursuance of orders received from the major-general commanding corps, I sent off my wagon train, with the other trains of the corps, toward Snake Creek Gap, to which place, on the 12th, I marched with my division, following that of Brigadier-General Baird, and arrived at a late hour in the night. Early on the morning of the 13th, pursuant to instructions received during the night previous, I replenished my supply of ammunition, issued rations, and got my troops under arms ready to march, but owing to the crowded condition of the only road from our position into Sugar Valley, it was nearly noon before we got fairly in motion. I moved out on the Resaca road about one mile,
f my wagon train, with the other trains of the corps, toward Snake Creek Gap, to which place, on the 12th, I marched with my division, following that of Brigadier-General Baird, and arrived at a late hour in the night. Early on the morning of the 13th, pursuant to instructions received during the night previous, I replenished my supply of ammunition, issued rations, and got my troops under arms ready to march, but owing to the crowded condition of the only road from our position into Sugar Vallctness as to position, or scarcely as to direction. At daybreak on the following morning, however, I formed my lines as directed, connecting my left with General Baird's division. The relative position of my brigades remained the same as on the 13th. Having met Major-General Palmer on the field, he informed me that the Fourteenth Corps, General Davis' division being in reserve, the Twenty-third Corps and Fourth Corps to their left, would, as soon as the proper disposition could be completed,
e at 4 p. m., I found some of Garrard's cavalry, which had passed me, already there. I formed my lines here so as to cover all approaches and remained until morning, seeing nothing of the enemy. May 20, marched by the Cassville road four miles, passing the Confederate saltpeter works, which I caused to be destroyed by my rear guard, and formed on the right of Baird's division, my left resting on the railroad, my right considerably refused. May 21 and 22, my division lay in bivouac. On the 22d my preparations for the ensuing march were arranged. By stripping my regiment of all baggage, except that which might be carried on the persons of officers or their horses, and sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immediately in rear of Barnett's Mill, and my
formed on the right of Baird's division, my left resting on the railroad, my right considerably refused. May 21 and 22, my division lay in bivouac. On the 22d my preparations for the ensuing march were arranged. By stripping my regiment of all baggage, except that which might be carried on the persons of officers or their horses, and sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immediately in rear of Barnett's Mill, and my right on the Cedartown road. On the 24th, at 10 a. m., I moved by my right, crossing Euharlee Creek, not fordable, on the rickety bridge near Widow Smith's house, which, however, it was found necessary to repair before I could pass my artillery over it. Within two miles of this my march was delayed until late in the afternoon by General
were arranged. By stripping my regiment of all baggage, except that which might be carried on the persons of officers or their horses, and sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immediately in rear of Barnett's Mill, and my right on the Cedartown road. On the 24th, at 10 a. m., I moved by my right, crossing Euharlee Creek, not fordable, on the rickety bridge near Widow Smith's house, which, however, it was found necessary to repair before I could pass my artillery over it. Within two miles of this my march was delayed until late in the afternoon by General Stanley's column, which I found passing into the same road from the left, in front of me. I did not make more than two miles beyond this, the road being very difficult and blocked with the wagons, a
t and blocked with the wagons, ambulances, and artillery of the troops which had preceded me. At 8 p. m., in the midst of a driving rainstorm, which lasted until 11 p. m., I went into bivouac on the Raccoon Creek. The 25th was spent in clearing the way for our trains by assisting the wagons of the Twentieth Corps over the difficult hills which border Raccoon Creek. By 10.30 o'clock that night all of my wagons were across and in park beyond my troops, toward Burnt Hickory. At 1 a. m. of the 26th I marched again, reaching Burnt Hickory before break of day. Two miles south of this, on the Dallas road; at 7 a. m., under instructions from Major-General Palmer, I halted in order to enable him to communicate with Major-General Thomas. At 11.30 a. m. we renewed the march, and early in the afternoon I formed my troops in rear of the Fourth Corps, about three miles east of Pumpkin Vine Creek, which we crossed by the bridge near Owen's Mill. On the 27th two brigades of my division participa
ard Burnt Hickory. At 1 a. m. of the 26th I marched again, reaching Burnt Hickory before break of day. Two miles south of this, on the Dallas road; at 7 a. m., under instructions from Major-General Palmer, I halted in order to enable him to communicate with Major-General Thomas. At 11.30 a. m. we renewed the march, and early in the afternoon I formed my troops in rear of the Fourth Corps, about three miles east of Pumpkin Vine Creek, which we crossed by the bridge near Owen's Mill. On the 27th two brigades of my division participated in the assault upon the enemy's right, being in support to the division of Brigadier-General Wood. General Wood's division was formed in column by brigade, each brigade being in two lines. General King's brigade was formed in the same manner in rear of Wood's, and Scribner's at first on the left of King's; before the assault finally commenced, however, he was advanced to the left of Wood's center brigade, and in this position advanced with the column.
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