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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
the direction and personal supervision of the major-general commanding corps, formed to the left of this road in double line, Carlin's brigade on the right, King's on the left, and Scribner's in reserve (then out as skirmishers), and advanced in a direction nearly east for about four miles over a very broken and heavily wooded country, the last mile of this distance my skirmishers driving those of the enemy before them. About one mile beyond the military road, constructed by the enemy from Dalton to Calhoun, we found the enemy in force and strongly posted, and the purpose of the movement being, as I understood, accomplished, I halted, by order of Major-General Palmer, corrected my lines, and waited for further instructions. My division remained in this position skirmishing with the enemy until, late in the evening, relieved by that of Major-General Butterfield. My instructions were as soon as relieved to form on the left of General Butterfield's division, my line being slightly ref
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
, marched through Adairsville, following, as on the day previous, Baird's division; bivouacked for the night at 12 midnight on the railroad within three miles of Kingston. May 19, marched in the rear of Baird into Kingston. Here, at 2.30, I was ordered by Major-General Palmer to move as rapidly as possible to seize a bridge (GilKingston. Here, at 2.30, I was ordered by Major-General Palmer to move as rapidly as possible to seize a bridge (Gillem's) over the Etowah, south of Kingston, toward which a force of the enemy was supposed to be making, either to secure their retreat or to destroy it. Reaching the bridge at 4 p. m., I found some of Garrard's cavalry, which had passed me, already there. I formed my lines here so as to cover all approaches and remained until morKingston, toward which a force of the enemy was supposed to be making, either to secure their retreat or to destroy it. Reaching the bridge at 4 p. m., I found some of Garrard's cavalry, which had passed me, already there. I formed my lines here so as to cover all approaches and remained until morning, seeing nothing of the enemy. May 20, marched by the Cassville road four miles, passing the Confederate saltpeter works, which I caused to be destroyed by my rear guard, and formed on the right of Baird's division, my left resting on the railroad, my right considerably refused. May 21 and 22, my division lay in bivouac. On
Ackworth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
ishing heavily with the enemy at periods and suffering considerable loss, until the evacuation by the enemy of their position on the 5th of June. From the morning of May 29 to the morning of June 6, I was unfitted for duty by the injuries before alluded to, and during this time the division was in command of Brigadier-General King. For the operations of this period I must, therefore, refer to his report. On the morning of the 6th of June I marched, following Baird's division toward Acworth. At dark I found my lines connecting with General Hooker's corps on my right and General Baird's division on the left, and bivouacked near John Pritchard's house. At this place we rested during the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On the morning of the 10th we marched, passing by Denham's house, and thence to Owen's Mill. Just in front of Newton's house, one mile south of Owen's, I was put into position, by a staff officer of Major-General Palmer, on the left of Brigadier-General Baird's division, wh
Buzzard Roost (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
unnel Hill and within their works at Buzzard Roost Pass, I advanced my line, swinging to the left to conform to the movement of Davis' troops, and again formed line of battle as before, upon his right, my right brigade covering the Trickum road, near Widow Rogers' house. In this position my troops bivouacked for the night, strong pickets being thrown out to a considerable distance on all the roads in the direction of Trickum and Villanow. The 8th was occupied in maneuvering in front of Buzzard Roost, my final position being with my left resting near the high knob, known to us as Signal Hill, and my line stretching southwardly, so as to command and practically close up all roads leading out of Buzzard Roost Gap to the west and southwest. Toward evening I caused a section to be placed in position on the ridge which terminated the open field to the westward of the gap, and opened upon a line of the enemy's works beyond the pass. This, with the advance of part of General Davis' divisi
Calhoun, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
ast mile of this distance my skirmishers driving those of the enemy before them. About one mile beyond the military road, constructed by the enemy from Dalton to Calhoun, we found the enemy in force and strongly posted, and the purpose of the movement being, as I understood, accomplished, I halted, by order of Major-General Palmer think, effect. Monday, May 16, I marched to Resaca and bivouacked in rear of the village. May 17, crossed the Oostenaula and marched by Damascus Church through Calhoun toward Adairsville; bivouacked at 11.30 p. m. about seven miles south of Calhoun, on the left of General Baird's division. May 18, marched through Adairsville, Calhoun, on the left of General Baird's division. May 18, marched through Adairsville, following, as on the day previous, Baird's division; bivouacked for the night at 12 midnight on the railroad within three miles of Kingston. May 19, marched in the rear of Baird into Kingston. Here, at 2.30, I was ordered by Major-General Palmer to move as rapidly as possible to seize a bridge (Gillem's) over the Etowah, south of
Doherty (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
r right, the other in the rear of the pass, to our left, evidently in the enemy's main line. Early on the morning of the 9th I advanced Carlin's brigade across Mill Creek to relieve some of the regiments of Wood's brigade, which had been thrown in there on the evening previous, and was occupying the ground at the base of Chattoogy, relying confidently on the tried troops of Carlin's brigade, to advance wherever footing could be found, I ordered my reserve brigade (General King's) across Mill Creek, to within close supporting distance. A careful reconnaissance by General Carlin all along his line, and to a considerable distance below his right, disclosed mained in the position in which the previous night had left us, skirmishing being kept up all day along my whole line. During the day I caused the bridges over Mill Creek (which, owing to the dam thrown across the stream within the gap by the enemy, was here too deep to be conveniently forded) to be repaired and others built to f
Adairsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
e pieces) played all day with precision and, I have good reason to think, effect. Monday, May 16, I marched to Resaca and bivouacked in rear of the village. May 17, crossed the Oostenaula and marched by Damascus Church through Calhoun toward Adairsville; bivouacked at 11.30 p. m. about seven miles south of Calhoun, on the left of General Baird's division. May 18, marched through Adairsville, following, as on the day previous, Baird's division; bivouacked for the night at 12 midnight on the Adairsville, following, as on the day previous, Baird's division; bivouacked for the night at 12 midnight on the railroad within three miles of Kingston. May 19, marched in the rear of Baird into Kingston. Here, at 2.30, I was ordered by Major-General Palmer to move as rapidly as possible to seize a bridge (Gillem's) over the Etowah, south of Kingston, toward which a force of the enemy was supposed to be making, either to secure their retreat or to destroy it. Reaching the bridge at 4 p. m., I found some of Garrard's cavalry, which had passed me, already there. I formed my lines here so as to cover all
Sugar Valley (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
t off my wagon train, with the other trains of the corps, toward Snake Creek Gap, to which place, on the 12th, I marched with my division, following that of Brigadier-General Baird, and arrived at a late hour in the night. Early on the morning of the 13th, pursuant to instructions received during the night previous, I replenished my supply of ammunition, issued rations, and got my troops under arms ready to march, but owing to the crowded condition of the only road from our position into Sugar Valley, it was nearly noon before we got fairly in motion. I moved out on the Resaca road about one mile, and then, under the direction and personal supervision of the major-general commanding corps, formed to the left of this road in double line, Carlin's brigade on the right, King's on the left, and Scribner's in reserve (then out as skirmishers), and advanced in a direction nearly east for about four miles over a very broken and heavily wooded country, the last mile of this distance my skirm
John B. Turchin (search for this): chapter 94
rth Illinois Infantry, at Parker's Gap, to hold that pass until the advance of the troops from the direction of Cleveland should cover it. On the day but one following, these regiments having been relieved, were transferred to the brigade of General Turchin, in the Third Division. The 4th, 5th, and 6th of May was spent in bivouac near Ringgold, waiting the concentration of the army and completing our preparations for the campaign. On the 7th, leaving all transportation, save the ambulances ang considerably over 200 in killed and wounded, this including many valuable officers. The loss in General King's brigade was comparatively light. On the evening of this day Scribner's brigade was thrown into line on the left of King to relieve Turchin's brigade. On Sunday his line was extended so as to relieve Van Derveer's brigade, and Carlin, who had been relieved on the evening previous by McCook's brigade, of Davis' division, was put in on Scribner's left, to relieve Hovey's division. S
John Bohan (search for this): chapter 94
nd occasional artillery firing on my right and left. My thanks are due to my brigade commanders, Brigadier-General King, Brigadier-GeneralCarlin, and Col. B. F. Scribner, and to my chief of artillery, Capt. L. H. Drury, for the cheerfulness and good judgment with which they have at all times, executed my orders, and furthered the objects of every movement; as also to the officers of my staff, particularly Surg. S. Marks, medical director; Capt. E. F. Deaton, commissary of subsistence; Lieut. John Bohan, acting assistant quartermaster, for the uniform fidelity and intelligence with which they have discharged their duties. June 13, I was compelled to leave my command on account of injuries received in battle, and was absent until July 13, when I resumed command of my division. July 14, 15, and 16, quiet,with occasional artillery firing. July 17, crossed the Chattahoochee and found General Davis in line, about 500 yards in front, upon one of a series of ridges which run in every dire
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