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Benjamin F. Scribner (search for this): chapter 94
ed to change my line, about one brigade front, to the left and front, to conform to a change in the position of Brigadier-General Davis' division. I was not able to move my batteries onto the new line. We remained in this position during the 12th and 13th without seeing anything of the enemy, although there was continuous skirmishing and occasional artillery firing on my right and left. My thanks are due to my brigade commanders, Brigadier-General King, Brigadier-GeneralCarlin, and Col. B. F. Scribner, and to my chief of artillery, Capt. L. H. Drury, for the cheerfulness and good judgment with which they have at all times, executed my orders, and furthered the objects of every movement; as also to the officers of my staff, particularly Surg. S. Marks, medical director; Capt. E. F. Deaton, commissary of subsistence; Lieut. John Bohan, acting assistant quartermaster, for the uniform fidelity and intelligence with which they have discharged their duties. June 13, I was compelled to l
B. F. Scribner (search for this): chapter 94
line of skirmishers from some of Carlin's and Scribner's regiments, had verified my own previous obwithdrawal of one brigade, I gave orders that Scribner should relieve Carlin's brigade and then streted, at the request of General Carlin and Colonel Scribner, that the movement should be postponed unbrigade on the right, King's on the left, and Scribner's in reserve (then out as skirmishers), and ag, my two brigades in the line moved forward, Scribner's having already, in anticipation of the moveparatively light. On the evening of this day Scribner's brigade was thrown into line on the left of's brigade, of Davis' division, was put in on Scribner's left, to relieve Hovey's division. Sharp smed in the same manner in rear of Wood's, and Scribner's at first on the left of King's; before the by the enemy on the night following, in which Scribner's brigade behaved with distinguished gallantr the report of Brigadier-General King and Colonel Scribner, which, I presume, have before this been
Thomas J. Wood (search for this): chapter 94
his, with the advance of part of General Davis' division and part of Wood's brigade, of Butterfield's division, to the ridge beyond the field,rlin's brigade across Mill Creek to relieve some of the regiments of Wood's brigade, which had been thrown in there on the evening previous, a and heard it reported to Major-General Thomas, by an officer of General Wood's staff, that the troops of that command had felt all along Chatupon the enemy's right, being in support to the division of Brigadier-General Wood. General Wood's division was formed in column by brigade, eGeneral Wood's division was formed in column by brigade, each brigade being in two lines. General King's brigade was formed in the same manner in rear of Wood's, and Scribner's at first on the left oWood's, and Scribner's at first on the left of King's; before the assault finally commenced, however, he was advanced to the left of Wood's center brigade, and in this position advanced wWood's center brigade, and in this position advanced with the column. For the particulars of their participation in this affair, as well as in the attack made upon our lines by the enemy on the n
E. F. Deaton (search for this): chapter 94
my, although there was continuous skirmishing and occasional artillery firing on my right and left. My thanks are due to my brigade commanders, Brigadier-General King, Brigadier-GeneralCarlin, and Col. B. F. Scribner, and to my chief of artillery, Capt. L. H. Drury, for the cheerfulness and good judgment with which they have at all times, executed my orders, and furthered the objects of every movement; as also to the officers of my staff, particularly Surg. S. Marks, medical director; Capt. E. F. Deaton, commissary of subsistence; Lieut. John Bohan, acting assistant quartermaster, for the uniform fidelity and intelligence with which they have discharged their duties. June 13, I was compelled to leave my command on account of injuries received in battle, and was absent until July 13, when I resumed command of my division. July 14, 15, and 16, quiet,with occasional artillery firing. July 17, crossed the Chattahoochee and found General Davis in line, about 500 yards in front, upon one
Jefferson C. Davis (search for this): chapter 94
e trains, I marched at daylight in rear of General Davis' division, by the main Ringgold and Daltone line and one in reserve, on the right of General Davis' division, my right brigade (General Carli Carlin's second line. Later in the day, General Davis having driven the enemy out of Tunnel Hillging to the left to conform to the movement of Davis' troops, and again formed line of battle as bee pass. This, with the advance of part of General Davis' division and part of Wood's brigade, of B he informed me that the Fourteenth Corps, General Davis' division being in reserve, the Twenty-thin the evening previous by McCook's brigade, of Davis' division, was put in on Scribner's left, to ronform to a change in the position of Brigadier-General Davis' division. I was not able to move myly 17, crossed the Chattahoochee and found General Davis in line, about 500 yards in front, upon onad, thence to the left, and came up in rear of Davis' division, forming the reserve of the line. L[1 more...]
ng their position. August 3, was relieved by Twentieth Corps and transferred to the right of Army of the Tennessee. August 4, King's brigade made a reconnaissance to the right and returned. August 5, moved out to the Sandtown road, thence to the left, and came up in rear of Davis' division, forming the reserve of the line. Late in the evening made a reconnaissance to the right to find the flank of the rebel lines, which was undertaken too late to accomplish much. On the 6th relieved General Hascall's division, which was moved to the right to join its proper corps. August 7, was ordered to assume command of the Fourteenth Army Corps, by virtue of seniority. In this hurried report I am unable to do the troops justice. When the campaign ends will forward a list of those whose good conduct deserves special mention. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding. Capt. A. C. McCLURG, Asst. Adjt. Gen. and Chief of St
Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 94
considerable loss, until the evacuation by the enemy of their position on the 5th of June. From the morning of May 29 to the morning of June 6, I was unfitted for duty by the injuries before alluded to, and during this time the division was in command of Brigadier-General King. For the operations of this period I must, therefore, refer to his report. On the morning of the 6th of June I marched, following Baird's division toward Acworth. At dark I found my lines connecting with General Hooker's corps on my right and General Baird's division on the left, and bivouacked near John Pritchard's house. At this place we rested during the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On the morning of the 10th we marched, passing by Denham's house, and thence to Owen's Mill. Just in front of Newton's house, one mile south of Owen's, I was put into position, by a staff officer of Major-General Palmer, on the left of Brigadier-General Baird's division, whose skirmishers had already found the enemy. My skirmi
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 94
rmy Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August--, 1864. Captain : In accordance with military usage, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from the opening of the campaign of the armies under command of Major-General Sherman down to the 13th of June, at which period I was compelled by a disability resulting from injuries received in action to turn over the command to Brigadier-General King: On the 3d of May, pursuant to instructions received from the majomy regiment of all baggage, except that which might be carried on the persons of officers or their horses, and sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immediately in rear of Barnett's Mill, and my right on the Cedartown road. On the 24th, at 10 a. m., I moved by m
d by Damascus Church through Calhoun toward Adairsville; bivouacked at 11.30 p. m. about seven miles south of Calhoun, on the left of General Baird's division. May 18, marched through Adairsville, following, as on the day previous, Baird's division; bivouacked for the night at 12 midnight on the railroad within three miles of Kingston. May 19, marched in the rear of Baird into Kingston. Here, at 2.30, I was ordered by Major-General Palmer to move as rapidly as possible to seize a bridge (Gillem's) over the Etowah, south of Kingston, toward which a force of the enemy was supposed to be making, either to secure their retreat or to destroy it. Reaching the bridge at 4 p. m., I found some of Garrard's cavalry, which had passed me, already there. I formed my lines here so as to cover all approaches and remained until morning, seeing nothing of the enemy. May 20, marched by the Cassville road four miles, passing the Confederate saltpeter works, which I caused to be destroyed by my rear
William P. Carlin (search for this): chapter 94
e. Early on the morning of the 9th I advanced Carlin's brigade across Mill Creek to relieve some oft of this officer, I was instructed to advance Carlin's brigade, so as, if possible, to clear the moay, relying confidently on the tried troops of Carlin's brigade, to advance wherever footing could b, by a strong line of skirmishers from some of Carlin's and Scribner's regiments, had verified my ode, I gave orders that Scribner should relieve Carlin's brigade and then strengthen his position by intrenchments, and that Carlin, upon being relieved, should withdraw across the creek to the positio coming on, I consented, at the request of General Carlin and Colonel Scribner, that the movement shosition at the same place. In this affair General Carlin's brigade suffered severely, losing consided so as to relieve Van Derveer's brigade, and Carlin, who had been relieved on the evening previous be the Little Pumpkin Vine Creek. That night Carlin's brigade, which had before been in reserve du[12 more...]
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