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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Graysville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
Captain : In accordance with military usage, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from the opening of the campaign of the armies under command of Major-General Sherman down to the 13th of June, at which period I was compelled by a disability resulting from injuries received in action to turn over the command to Brigadier-General King: On the 3d of May, pursuant to instructions received from the major-general commanding corps, I moved from Graysville, Ga., to Ringgold, Ga., leaving an outpost of two regiments, the Nineteenth Illinois Infantry and Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry, at Parker's Gap, to hold that pass until the advance of the troops from the direction of Cleveland should cover it. On the day but one following, these regiments having been relieved, were transferred to the brigade of General Turchin, in the Third Division. The 4th, 5th, and 6th of May was spent in bivouac near Ringgold, waiting the concentration of the army an
Etowah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
's division, my left resting on the railroad, my right considerably refused. May 21 and 22, my division lay in bivouac. On the 22d my preparations for the ensuing march were arranged. By stripping my regiment of all baggage, except that which might be carried on the persons of officers or their horses, and sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immediately in rear of Barnett's Mill, and my right on the Cedartown road. On the 24th, at 10 a. m., I moved by my right, crossing Euharlee Creek, not fordable, on the rickety bridge near Widow Smith's house, which, however, it was found necessary to repair before I could pass my artillery over it. Within two miles of this my march was delayed until late in the afternoon by General Stanley's column, which I fo
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
p. m. my line was ordered forward, the enemy was driven from his rifle-pits, and back over a ridge, in which my entire line intrenched itself. July 22, at 2 a. m. my skirmishers and main line --occupied the first line of the enemy's defenses of Atlanta. At 8 a. m. the column was put in motion on the direct road to Atlanta. When near the city a heavy skirmish line was encountered. Instaritly the troops were placed in line of battle, the artillery brought forward, and a heavy fire directed uAtlanta. When near the city a heavy skirmish line was encountered. Instaritly the troops were placed in line of battle, the artillery brought forward, and a heavy fire directed upon the enemy in plain view. The troops at once intrenched themselves. From the 22d July till August 3, the troops were engaged advancing their lines and strengthening their position. August 3, was relieved by Twentieth Corps and transferred to the right of Army of the Tennessee. August 4, King's brigade made a reconnaissance to the right and returned. August 5, moved out to the Sandtown road, thence to the left, and came up in rear of Davis' division, forming the reserve of the line. L
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
my supply of ammunition, issued rations, and got my troops under arms ready to march, but owing to the crowded condition of the only road from our position into Sugar Valley, it was nearly noon before we got fairly in motion. I moved out on the Resaca road about one mile, and then, under the direction and personal supervision of the major-general commanding corps, formed to the left of this road in double line, Carlin's brigade on the right, King's on the left, and Scribner's in reserve (then Sharp skirmishing was kept up all day on my line, from which both my own troops and the enemy's suffered slightly. My artillery (twelve pieces) played all day with precision and, I have good reason to think, effect. Monday, May 16, I marched to Resaca and bivouacked in rear of the village. May 17, crossed the Oostenaula and marched by Damascus Church through Calhoun toward Adairsville; bivouacked at 11.30 p. m. about seven miles south of Calhoun, on the left of General Baird's division. May
Howell's Ferry (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
l. A. G. McCook) was formed on the left of the Third, and King's brigade was formed in reserve with the artillery. At 4 p. m. Colonel Moore advanced his line southeast on the Buck Head road, over a veryTough and rugged country, to Nancy's Creek, where he bivouacked for the night. July 18, at 7 a. m. I directed McCook to take the advance; skirmishing commenced at 9 a. m. and continued, the enemy falling back slowly until about 2 p. m., when line of battle was formed on the Buck Head and Howells Ferry road. A heavy line of skirmishers were thrown forward to drive the enemy beyond Peach Tree Creek. On retiring beyond the creek the bridge was destroyed by the rebels, and they opened up a vigorous fire with shell and case-shot upon the reserves. July 19, bridges were constructed to cross the command, and on July 20 the creek was crossed, the troops thrown in line, and temporary breast-works constructed. About 3 p. m. a heavy fire began along the whole line of the Twentieth Corps, gra
Cassville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
re, at 2.30, I was ordered by Major-General Palmer to move as rapidly as possible to seize a bridge (Gillem's) over the Etowah, south of Kingston, toward which a force of the enemy was supposed to be making, either to secure their retreat or to destroy it. Reaching the bridge at 4 p. m., I found some of Garrard's cavalry, which had passed me, already there. I formed my lines here so as to cover all approaches and remained until morning, seeing nothing of the enemy. May 20, marched by the Cassville road four miles, passing the Confederate saltpeter works, which I caused to be destroyed by my rear guard, and formed on the right of Baird's division, my left resting on the railroad, my right considerably refused. May 21 and 22, my division lay in bivouac. On the 22d my preparations for the ensuing march were arranged. By stripping my regiment of all baggage, except that which might be carried on the persons of officers or their horses, and sending back the surplus, I was able to prov
Villanow (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
er in the day, General Davis having driven the enemy out of Tunnel Hill and within their works at Buzzard Roost Pass, I advanced my line, swinging to the left to conform to the movement of Davis' troops, and again formed line of battle as before, upon his right, my right brigade covering the Trickum road, near Widow Rogers' house. In this position my troops bivouacked for the night, strong pickets being thrown out to a considerable distance on all the roads in the direction of Trickum and Villanow. The 8th was occupied in maneuvering in front of Buzzard Roost, my final position being with my left resting near the high knob, known to us as Signal Hill, and my line stretching southwardly, so as to command and practically close up all roads leading out of Buzzard Roost Gap to the west and southwest. Toward evening I caused a section to be placed in position on the ridge which terminated the open field to the westward of the gap, and opened upon a line of the enemy's works beyond the p
Chattoogata Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
in line. Early on the morning of the 9th I advanced Carlin's brigade across Mill Creek to relieve some of the regiments of Wood's brigade, which had been thrown in there on the evening previous, and was occupying the ground at the base of Chattoogata Mountain. About 11 a. m. I was, by direction of Major-General Palmer (he having gone to his headquarters in the rear sick), at department headquarters, to receive instructions, and heard it reported to Major-General Thomas, by an officer of Genera's and Scribner's regiments, had verified my own previous observations and the report of Brigadier-General Carlin, I ordered the attempt to be given up. My loss from the enemy's artillery in this affair was unusually heavy, the battery on Chattoogata Mountain and one near their left, and which I judge to be on the eastern slope of Rocky Face, burst their shell among us with remarkable accuracy. May 10, we remained in the position in which the previous night had left us, skirmishing being ke
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
p. m., in the midst of a driving rainstorm, which lasted until 11 p. m., I went into bivouac on the Raccoon Creek. The 25th was spent in clearing the way for our trains by assisting the wagons of the Twentieth Corps over the difficult hills which border Raccoon Creek. By 10.30 o'clock that night all of my wagons were across and in park beyond my troops, toward Burnt Hickory. At 1 a. m. of the 26th I marched again, reaching Burnt Hickory before break of day. Two miles south of this, on the Dallas road; at 7 a. m., under instructions from Major-General Palmer, I halted in order to enable him to communicate with Major-General Thomas. At 11.30 a. m. we renewed the march, and early in the afternoon I formed my troops in rear of the Fourth Corps, about three miles east of Pumpkin Vine Creek, which we crossed by the bridge near Owen's Mill. On the 27th two brigades of my division participated in the assault upon the enemy's right, being in support to the division of Brigadier-General Wo
Euharlee Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 94
sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immediately in rear of Barnett's Mill, and my right on the Cedartown road. On the 24th, at 10 a. m., I moved by my right, crossing Euharlee Creek, not fordable, on the rickety bridge near Widow Smith's house, which, however,Euharlee Creek, not fordable, on the rickety bridge near Widow Smith's house, which, however, it was found necessary to repair before I could pass my artillery over it. Within two miles of this my march was delayed until late in the afternoon by General Stanley's column, which I found passing into the same road from the left, in front of me. I did not make more than two miles beyond this, the road being very difficult and blocked with the wagons, ambulances, and artillery of the troops which had preceded me. At 8 p. m., in the midst of a driving rainstorm, which lasted until 11 p. m.,
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