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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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No. 90. report of Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-June 13 and July 13-August 7. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August--, 1864. Captain : In accordance with military usage, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from the opening of the campaign of the armies under command of Major-General Sherman down to the 13th of June, at which period I was compelled by a disability resulting from injuries received in action to turn over the command to Brigadier-General King: On the 3d of May, pursuant to instructions receiveissary of subsistence; Lieut. John Bohan, acting assistant quartermaster, for the uniform fidelity and intelligence with which they have discharged their duties. June 13, I was compelled to leave my command on account of injuries received in battle, and was absent until July 13, when I resumed command of my division. July 14, 15,
ard Burnt Hickory. At 1 a. m. of the 26th I marched again, reaching Burnt Hickory before break of day. Two miles south of this, on the Dallas road; at 7 a. m., under instructions from Major-General Palmer, I halted in order to enable him to communicate with Major-General Thomas. At 11.30 a. m. we renewed the march, and early in the afternoon I formed my troops in rear of the Fourth Corps, about three miles east of Pumpkin Vine Creek, which we crossed by the bridge near Owen's Mill. On the 27th two brigades of my division participated in the assault upon the enemy's right, being in support to the division of Brigadier-General Wood. General Wood's division was formed in column by brigade, each brigade being in two lines. General King's brigade was formed in the same manner in rear of Wood's, and Scribner's at first on the left of King's; before the assault finally commenced, however, he was advanced to the left of Wood's center brigade, and in this position advanced with the column.
for the assault, a short distance to the south of Pickett's Mills, on what I understand to be the Little Pumpkin Vine Creek. That night Carlin's brigade, which had before been in reserve during the day, was placed in position on the extreme left. My line was an exceedingly bad one, but it seemed impracticable to correct it. Here the division remained, skirmishing heavily with the enemy at periods and suffering considerable loss, until the evacuation by the enemy of their position on the 5th of June. From the morning of May 29 to the morning of June 6, I was unfitted for duty by the injuries before alluded to, and during this time the division was in command of Brigadier-General King. For the operations of this period I must, therefore, refer to his report. On the morning of the 6th of June I marched, following Baird's division toward Acworth. At dark I found my lines connecting with General Hooker's corps on my right and General Baird's division on the left, and bivouacked
ble to correct it. Here the division remained, skirmishing heavily with the enemy at periods and suffering considerable loss, until the evacuation by the enemy of their position on the 5th of June. From the morning of May 29 to the morning of June 6, I was unfitted for duty by the injuries before alluded to, and during this time the division was in command of Brigadier-General King. For the operations of this period I must, therefore, refer to his report. On the morning of the 6th of Ju6th of June I marched, following Baird's division toward Acworth. At dark I found my lines connecting with General Hooker's corps on my right and General Baird's division on the left, and bivouacked near John Pritchard's house. At this place we rested during the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On the morning of the 10th we marched, passing by Denham's house, and thence to Owen's Mill. Just in front of Newton's house, one mile south of Owen's, I was put into position, by a staff officer of Major-General Palmer, o
uacked for the night. July 18, at 7 a. m. I directed McCook to take the advance; skirmishing commenced at 9 a. m. and continued, the enemy falling back slowly until about 2 p. m., when line of battle was formed on the Buck Head and Howells Ferry road. A heavy line of skirmishers were thrown forward to drive the enemy beyond Peach Tree Creek. On retiring beyond the creek the bridge was destroyed by the rebels, and they opened up a vigorous fire with shell and case-shot upon the reserves. July 19, bridges were constructed to cross the command, and on July 20 the creek was crossed, the troops thrown in line, and temporary breast-works constructed. About 3 p. m. a heavy fire began along the whole line of the Twentieth Corps, gradually approaching us, and finally involving my First Brigade (McCook's), which repulsed every attack made upon it, with slight loss. My efficient and gallant assistant adjutant-general, E. T. Wells, was severely wounded. July 21, about 3 p. m. my line was o
s which run in every direction, in deep woods. The Third Brigade (Colonel Moore commanding) was formed on the left of General Davis; his skirmishers were advanced; the enemy retired slowly. The First Brigade (Col. A. G. McCook) was formed on the left of the Third, and King's brigade was formed in reserve with the artillery. At 4 p. m. Colonel Moore advanced his line southeast on the Buck Head road, over a veryTough and rugged country, to Nancy's Creek, where he bivouacked for the night. July 18, at 7 a. m. I directed McCook to take the advance; skirmishing commenced at 9 a. m. and continued, the enemy falling back slowly until about 2 p. m., when line of battle was formed on the Buck Head and Howells Ferry road. A heavy line of skirmishers were thrown forward to drive the enemy beyond Peach Tree Creek. On retiring beyond the creek the bridge was destroyed by the rebels, and they opened up a vigorous fire with shell and case-shot upon the reserves. July 19, bridges were construc
ent; as also to the officers of my staff, particularly Surg. S. Marks, medical director; Capt. E. F. Deaton, commissary of subsistence; Lieut. John Bohan, acting assistant quartermaster, for the uniform fidelity and intelligence with which they have discharged their duties. June 13, I was compelled to leave my command on account of injuries received in battle, and was absent until July 13, when I resumed command of my division. July 14, 15, and 16, quiet,with occasional artillery firing. July 17, crossed the Chattahoochee and found General Davis in line, about 500 yards in front, upon one of a series of ridges which run in every direction, in deep woods. The Third Brigade (Colonel Moore commanding) was formed on the left of General Davis; his skirmishers were advanced; the enemy retired slowly. The First Brigade (Col. A. G. McCook) was formed on the left of the Third, and King's brigade was formed in reserve with the artillery. At 4 p. m. Colonel Moore advanced his line southeas
to the south of Pickett's Mills, on what I understand to be the Little Pumpkin Vine Creek. That night Carlin's brigade, which had before been in reserve during the day, was placed in position on the extreme left. My line was an exceedingly bad one, but it seemed impracticable to correct it. Here the division remained, skirmishing heavily with the enemy at periods and suffering considerable loss, until the evacuation by the enemy of their position on the 5th of June. From the morning of May 29 to the morning of June 6, I was unfitted for duty by the injuries before alluded to, and during this time the division was in command of Brigadier-General King. For the operations of this period I must, therefore, refer to his report. On the morning of the 6th of June I marched, following Baird's division toward Acworth. At dark I found my lines connecting with General Hooker's corps on my right and General Baird's division on the left, and bivouacked near John Pritchard's house. At t
fficient and gallant assistant adjutant-general, E. T. Wells, was severely wounded. July 21, about 3 p. m. my line was ordered forward, the enemy was driven from his rifle-pits, and back over a ridge, in which my entire line intrenched itself. July 22, at 2 a. m. my skirmishers and main line --occupied the first line of the enemy's defenses of Atlanta. At 8 a. m. the column was put in motion on the direct road to Atlanta. When near the city a heavy skirmish line was encountered. Instaritly the troops were placed in line of battle, the artillery brought forward, and a heavy fire directed upon the enemy in plain view. The troops at once intrenched themselves. From the 22d July till August 3, the troops were engaged advancing their lines and strengthening their position. August 3, was relieved by Twentieth Corps and transferred to the right of Army of the Tennessee. August 4, King's brigade made a reconnaissance to the right and returned. August 5, moved out to the Sandtown
ase-shot upon the reserves. July 19, bridges were constructed to cross the command, and on July 20 the creek was crossed, the troops thrown in line, and temporary breast-works constructed. About 3 p. m. a heavy fire began along the whole line of the Twentieth Corps, gradually approaching us, and finally involving my First Brigade (McCook's), which repulsed every attack made upon it, with slight loss. My efficient and gallant assistant adjutant-general, E. T. Wells, was severely wounded. July 21, about 3 p. m. my line was ordered forward, the enemy was driven from his rifle-pits, and back over a ridge, in which my entire line intrenched itself. July 22, at 2 a. m. my skirmishers and main line --occupied the first line of the enemy's defenses of Atlanta. At 8 a. m. the column was put in motion on the direct road to Atlanta. When near the city a heavy skirmish line was encountered. Instaritly the troops were placed in line of battle, the artillery brought forward, and a heavy fi
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