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Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1
Preface The object aimed at in this narrative is to recount the daily acts of General Grant in the field, to describe minutely his personal traits and habits, and to explain the motives which actuated him in important crises by giving his criticisms upon events in the language employed by him at the time they took place. The chief effort of the author has been to enable readers to view the Union commander near by, and to bring them into such intimate contact with him that they may know him as familiarly as those who served by his side. It has been no part of the author's purpose to give a detailed history of the campaigns referred to, but to describe the military movements only so far as necessary to show General Grant's intentions and plans and the general results of his operations. Mention of particular commands, subordinate commanders, and topographical features, therefore, had to be in large measure omitted. While serving as a personal aid to the general-in-chief
g several telegrams and giving some directions to his staff, he began to describe the probabilities of the chances of the expedition down the river, expressing a confident belief in its success. General W. F. Smith, who had been so closely identified with the project, was given command of the movement. At midnight he began his march down the north bank of the river with 2800 men. At three o'clock on the morning of the 27th, Hazen started silently down the stream, with his pontoons carrying 1800 men; at five he made a landing at Brown's Ferry, completely surprising the guard at that point, and taking most of them prisoners; at seven o'clock Smith's force had been ferried across, and began to fortify a strong position; and at ten a bridge had been completed. Hooker's advance, coming up from Bridgeport, arrived the next afternoon, the 28th, at Brown's Ferry. The river was now open from Bridgeport to Kelley's Ferry, and the wagon road from that point to Chattanooga by way of Brown's F
by lifting his hat, the guard was then dismissed, and he continued his ride toward our left. We knew that we were engaged in a civil war, but such civility largely exceeded our expectations. In company with General Thomas and other members of his staff, I was brought into almost daily contact with General Grant, and became intensely interested in the progress of the plans he was maturing for dealing with the enemy at all points of the theater of war lying within his command. Early in November instructions came from the Secretary of War calling me to Washington, and in accordance therewith General Thomas issued an order relieving me from duty with his army. General orders, no. 261.Headquarters, Department of the Cumberland, Chattanooga, Tenn., November 5, 1863. 1. Captain Thomas G. Baylor, ordnance corps, having, pursuant to orders from the Secretary of War, relieved Captain Horace Porter from duty at these headquarters, is announced as chief of ordnance for this army, an
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 2
the War Department, beginning with the words, Grant arrived last night, wet, dirty, and well. On the 19th of October General Grant's command had been enlarged so as to cover the newly created mid the appearance of the autumn storms. General Grant, upon assuming the responsibilities of hisy, I will hold the town till we starve. General Grant had started, the day before the incident I such trying circumstances. As soon as General Grant had partaken of a light supper immediatelye off one spur before going to bed. At General Grant's request, General Thomas, General Williamops, and described the general situation. General Grant sat for some time as immovable as a rock ad when this recommendation was reported to General Grant he laughed heartily at the humor of the sus sentinels cried out, Turn out the guard--General Grant! The confederate guard took up the joke, g of the 5th of November I was sent for by General Grant to come to his headquarters. On my arriva[8 more...]
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 2
st meeting with General Grant a conference at Thomas's headquarters Grant's manner of writing desp an orderly brought me a message from General George H. Thomas, Commander of the Army of the Cumberlers and top-boots were spattered with mud. General Thomas approached this officer, and, turning to might supper immediately after his arrival, General Thomas had sent for several general officers and xceedingly interesting group. A member of General Thomas's staff quietly called that officer's atteds were usually no respecters of persons. General Thomas's mind had been so intent upon receiving t departed he had made an appointment with Generals Thomas and Smith and several staff-officers to aeded our expectations. In company with General Thomas and other members of his staff, I was brouto Washington, and in accordance therewith General Thomas issued an order relieving me from duty wit It was a subject of much regret to leave General Thomas, for I had become greatly attached to him,[4 more...]
he scattered sheets, read them over rapidly, and arranged them in their proper order. Turning to me after a time, he said, Perhaps you might like to read what I am sending. I thanked him, and in looking over the despatches I found that he was ordering up Sherman's entire force from Corinth to within supporting distance, and was informing Halleck of the dispositions decided upon for the opening of a line of supplies, and assuring him that everything possible would be done for the relief of Burnside in east Tennessee. Directions were also given for the taking of vigorous and comprehensive steps in every direction throughout his new and extensive command. At a late hour, after having given further directions in regard to the contemplated movement for the opening of the route from Bridgeport to Chattanooga, and in the mean time sending back to be foraged all the animals that could be spared, he bid those present a pleasant good night, and limped off to his bedroom. I cannot dwell
Charles A. Dana (search for this): chapter 2
turning to me and mentioning me by name, said, I want to present you to General Grant. Thereupon the officer seated in the chair, without changing his position, glanced up, extended his arm to its full length, shook hands, and said in a low voice, and speaking slowly, How do you do? This was my first meeting with the man with whom I was destined afterward to spend so many of the most interesting years of my life. The strange officers present were members of General Grant's staff. Charles A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, who had been for some time with the Army of the Cumberland, had also entered the room. The next morning he sent a despatch to the War Department, beginning with the words, Grant arrived last night, wet, dirty, and well. On the 19th of October General Grant's command had been enlarged so as to cover the newly created military division of the Mississippi, embracing nearly the entire field of operations between the Alleghanies and the Mississippi River, and
l sat at a table, smoking, and writing despatches. After finishing several telegrams and giving some directions to his staff, he began to describe the probabilities of the chances of the expedition down the river, expressing a confident belief in its success. General W. F. Smith, who had been so closely identified with the project, was given command of the movement. At midnight he began his march down the north bank of the river with 2800 men. At three o'clock on the morning of the 27th, Hazen started silently down the stream, with his pontoons carrying 1800 men; at five he made a landing at Brown's Ferry, completely surprising the guard at that point, and taking most of them prisoners; at seven o'clock Smith's force had been ferried across, and began to fortify a strong position; and at ten a bridge had been completed. Hooker's advance, coming up from Bridgeport, arrived the next afternoon, the 28th, at Brown's Ferry. The river was now open from Bridgeport to Kelley's Ferry, an
October 19th (search for this): chapter 2
you do? This was my first meeting with the man with whom I was destined afterward to spend so many of the most interesting years of my life. The strange officers present were members of General Grant's staff. Charles A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, who had been for some time with the Army of the Cumberland, had also entered the room. The next morning he sent a despatch to the War Department, beginning with the words, Grant arrived last night, wet, dirty, and well. On the 19th of October General Grant's command had been enlarged so as to cover the newly created military division of the Mississippi, embracing nearly the entire field of operations between the Alleghanies and the Mississippi River, and the Army of the Cumberland had thus been placed under his control. About a month before, that army, after having fought at Chickamauga one of the most gallantly contested and sanguinary battles in the annals of warfare, had fallen back and taken up a defensive position on t
ing nearly the entire field of operations between the Alleghanies and the Mississippi River, and the Army of the Cumberland had thus been placed under his control. About a month before, that army, after having fought at Chickamauga one of the most gallantly contested and sanguinary battles in the annals of warfare, had fallen back and taken up a defensive position on the south side of the Tennessee River, inclosing within its lines the village of Chattanooga. The opposing forces, under General Bragg, had invested this position, and established such a close siege that the lines of supply had been virtually cut off, rations and forage were about exhausted, and almost the last tree-stump had been used for fuel. Most of the men were without overcoats, and some without shoes; ten thousand animals had died of starvation, and the gloom and despondency had been increased by the approach of cold weather and the appearance of the autumn storms. General Grant, upon assuming the responsib
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