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North Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
he was subjected. In the mean time Jeff Davis was pacing along with a smoothness which made me feel as if I were seated in a rocking-chair. When we reached headquarters the general dismounted in a manner which showed that he was pretty stiff from the ride. As he touched the ground he turned and said with a quizzical look, Well, I must acknowledge that animal is pretty rough. Sheridan had arrived on June 20 at White House, on his return from the expedition to the north side of the North Anna River, upon which he had been sent on the 7th. As soon as Lee learned of Hunter's success he sent Breckinridge's troops to oppose him; and hearing that Sheridan had started, he ordered Hampton's and Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry commands to move against our cavalry. They were to attack Sheridan during the night of the 10th and surprise him; but that officer was not to be caught napping. He advanced promptly toward Trevilian's Station, and in a well-conceived and brilliantly executed battle defeat
) (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
met him. The President soon stepped ashore, and after sitting awhile at headquarters mounted the large bay horse Cincinnati, while the general rode with him on Jeff Davis. Three of us of the staff accompanied them, and the scenes encountered in visiting both Butler's and Meade's commands were most interesting. Mr. Lincoln wore rider; and if distances are to be measured by the amount of fatigue endured, this exertion added many miles to the trip. The general was riding his black pony Jeff Davis. This smooth little pacer shuffled along at a gait which was too fast for a walk and not fast enough for a gallop, so that all the other horses had to move at that of the animal were not always in touch, and he saw that all the party were considerably amused at the jogging to which he was subjected. In the mean time Jeff Davis was pacing along with a smoothness which made me feel as if I were seated in a rocking-chair. When we reached headquarters the general dismounted in a manner
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
then discovered that he had made out his requisition on a corps blank. A hospital had been established at City Point large enough to accommodate 6000 patients, and served a very useful purpose. The general manifested a deep interest in this hospital, frequently visited it, and constantly received verbal reports from the surgeons in charge as to the care and comfort of the wounded. A telegraph-line had been established on the south side of the James which connected by cable across Hampton Roads with Fort Monroe. From that place there was direct telegraphic communication with Washington. This line was occasionally broken, but by dint of great effort it was generally well maintained and made to perform excellent service. The general headquarters had become an intensely interesting spot. Direct communication was kept open as far as possible with the various armies throughout the country, all of which the general-in-chief was directing, and information of an exciting nature
Roanoke Station (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
d to send Wilson's division of cavalry, which had remained with the Army of the Potomac, and four regiments of the cavalry of the Army of the James under Kautz, to the south of Petersburg, with a view to striking both the South Side and the Danville railroads. This cavalry command started out on the morning of June 22. It was composed of nearly 6000 men and several batteries of horse-artillery. It first struck the Weldon, then the South Side Railroad, and afterward advanced as far as Roanoke Station on the Danville road, inflicting much damage. On the 29th, after severe fighting, it found itself confronted and partly surrounded by such a heavy force of the enemy that there was no means of cutting a way through with success; and it was decided to issue all the remaining ammunition, destroy the wagons and caissons, and fall back to the Union lines. The troops were hard pressed by greatly superior numbers, and suffered severely upon their march, but by untiring energy and great gall
Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
l James H. Wilson's raid the staff enlarged On June 21 Butler had thrown a pontoon-bridge across the James, and seized a position on the north side known as Deep Bottom, ten miles below Richmond. General Grant had directed this with a view to divide the attention of the enemy's troops, and to confuse them as to whether to expehad in contemplation some operations on the north side of the James, which he intended to carry out under certain contingencies, in which case the occupation of Deep Bottom might become important. On Tuesday, June 21, a white river-steamer arrived at the wharf, bringing President Lincoln, who had embraced this opportunity to viremarked to Butler: When Grant once gets possession of a place, he holds on to it as if he had inherited it. Orders had been sent to have the pontoon-bridge at Deep Bottom opened for the passage of the President's boat, so that he could proceed some distance beyond that point. His whole conversation during his visit showed the de
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
eneral. He said at once, Why, yes; I'd just as lief swap with you as not ; and threw himself off his pony and mounted my uncomfortable beast, while I put myself astride of Jeff. The general had always been a famous rider, even when a cadet at West Point. When he rode or drove a strange horse, not many minutes elapsed before he and the animal seemed to understand each other perfectly. In my experience I have never seen a better rider, or one who had a more steady seat, no matter what sort of galls, who had distinguished himself by the exhibition of signal ability as chief quartermaster of the Army of the Potomac, was assigned to duty as chief quartermaster upon the staff of the general-in-chief. Grant and he had been classmates at West Point, and were on terms of extreme intimacy. Ingalls was exceedingly popular in the army, and both officially and personally was regarded as an important acquisition to the staff. Lieutenant-colonel M. R. Morgan, an efficient and experienced offi
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
brave fellows who have fought their way down to Petersburg in this wonderful campaign, and I am ready to start at any time. General Grant presented to Mr. Lincoln the officers of the staff who were present, and he had for each one a cordial greeting and a pleasant word. There was a kindliness in his tone and a hearty manner of expression which went far to captivate all who met him. The President soon stepped ashore, and after sitting awhile at headquarters mounted the large bay horse Cincinnati, while the general rode with him on Jeff Davis. Three of us of the staff accompanied them, and the scenes encountered in visiting both Butler's and Meade's commands were most interesting. Mr. Lincoln wore a very high black silk hat and black trousers and frockcoat. Like most men who had been brought up in the West, he had good command of a horse, but it must be acknowledged that in appearance he was not a very dashing rider. On this occasion, by the time he had reached the troops he wa
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ss he didn't mention. That night Mr. Lincoln slept aboard the boat which had brought him to City Point. He had expressed to General Grant a desire to go up the James the next day, to see that portthat all may be accomplished with as little bloodshed as possible. Soon after his return to City Point the President started back to Washington. His visit to the army had been a memorable event. gave Grant and his staff a comfortable lunch, and late in the afternoon our party started for City Point. Owing to the heat and dust, the long ride was exceedingly uncomfortable. My best horse ient military history. In view of the important operations which were to be conducted from City Point, General Grant made some changes in the organization of the staff. General Rufus Ingalls, whod that he had made out his requisition on a corps blank. A hospital had been established at City Point large enough to accommodate 6000 patients, and served a very useful purpose. The general mani
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
reciation of the great task which had been accomplished since he and the general had parted in Washington. The group then went into the after-cabin. General Grant said: I hope you are very well, Mr.le bloodshed as possible. Soon after his return to City Point the President started back to Washington. His visit to the army had been a memorable event. General Grant and he had had so much delit part of the line. The guns of the siege-train which he had ordered now began to arrive from Washington. Meade was told that they would be sent to him immediately, and it was decided to spend the nvantage at several points, and when we returned to headquarters that evening he telegraphed to Washington for five or six additional batteries. From the 4th of May until the end of June there had mpton Roads with Fort Monroe. From that place there was direct telegraphic communication with Washington. This line was occasionally broken, but by dint of great effort it was generally well maintai
Sangamon County (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
much from any other powder that had ever been used. I told him that I happened to have in my tent a specimen which had been sent to headquarters as a curiosity, and that I would bring it to him. When I returned with a grain of the powder about the size of a walnut, he took it, turned it over in his hand, and after examining it carefully, said: Well, it's rather larger than the powder we used to buy in my shooting days. It reminds me of what occurred once in a country meeting-house in Sangamon County. You see, there were very few newspapers then, and the country storekeepers had to resort to some other means of advertising their wares. If, for instance, the preacher happened to be late in coming to a prayer-meeting of an evening, the shopkeepers would often put in the time while the people were waiting by notifying them of any new arrival of an attractive line of goods. One evening a man rose up and said: Brethren, let me take occasion to say, while we're a-waitin‘, that I have j
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