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Lew Wallace (search for this): chapter 28
aylight left us. My cavalry are rapidly exhausting their ammunition, and if the attack is delayed much longer they may have none left. And then another batch of staff-officers was sent out to gallop through the mud and hurry up the columns. At four o'clock the formation was completed, the order for the assault was given, and the struggle for Pickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from left to right as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the right of the line, Munford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher's Run, to guard the trains. I rode to the front, in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. Ayres threw out a skirmish-line and advanced across an open field which sloped down gradually toward the dense woods just north of the White Oak road. He soon met with a f
The movement against five Forks the battle of five Forks carrying the news of five Forks to Grant Grant Prepares to assault the Petersburg lines capturing the works at Petersburg Grant Writespatches under fire capture of forts Gregg and Whitworth Early the next morning (April 1) General Grant said to me: I wish you would spend the day with Sheridan's command, and send me a bulletin eA few minutes before noon Colonel Babcock came over from headquarters, and said to Sheridan: General Grant directs me to say to you that if, in your judgment, the Fifth Corps would do better under onion commanders, you are authorized to relieve General Warren and order him to report to him [General Grant] at headquarters. General Sheridan replied in effect that he hoped such a step as that mighched headquarters at Dabney's Mill before the arrival of the last courier I had despatched. General Grant was sitting, with most of the staff about him, before a blazing camp-fire. He wore his blue
E. Babcock (search for this): chapter 28
ind his intrenchments at Five Forks, which seemed likely. While we were talking, General Warren, who had accompanied Crawford's division, rode up and reported in person to Sheridan. It was then eleven o'clock. A few minutes before noon Colonel Babcock came over from headquarters, and said to Sheridan: General Grant directs me to say to you that if, in your judgment, the Fifth Corps would do better under one of its division commanders, you are authorized to relieve General Warren and orderated by his successes of the morning, and loudly demanded to be permitted to make a general attack on the enemy. Sheridan told him he didn't believe he had ammunition enough. Said Devin: I guess I've got enough to give 'em one surge more. Colonel Babcock now left us to return to headquarters. About one o'clock it was reported by the cavalry that the enemy was retiring to his intrenched position at Five Forks, which was just north of the White Oak road and parallel to it, his earthworks runn
and met Sheridan about 10 A. M. on the Five Forks road not far from J. Boisseau's house. Ayres had his division on this road, having arrived about daylight; and Griffin had reached J. Boisseau's between 7 and 8 A. M. I had a full conference with Sheridan, in which he told me that the force in front of him had fallen back early in corps to move up the Gravelly Run Church road to the open ground near the church, and form in order of battle, with Ayres on the left, Crawford on his right, and Griffin in rear as a reserve. The corps was to wheel to the left and make its attack upon the angle, and then, moving westward, sweep down in rear of the enemy's intrenc preparations to protect his own detached command from a possible attack by Lee's army in the morning. He said to me that he had just relieved Warren, and placed Griffin in command of the Fifth Corps. I had been sending frequent bulletins to the general-in-chief during the day, and now despatched a courier announcing the change o
Alexander Hays (search for this): chapter 28
own from the west. All now looks highly favorable. Ord is engaged, but I have not yet heard the result in his front. A cheering despatch was also sent to Sheridan, winding up with the words: I think nothing is now wanting but the approach of your force from the west to finish up the job on this side. Soon Ord was heard from as having broken through the intrenchments. Humphreys, too, had been doing gallant work. At half-past 7 the line in his front was captured, and half an hour later Hays's division of his corps had carried an important earthwork, with three guns and most of the garrison. At 8:30 A. M. a despatch was brought in from Ord saying that some of his troops had just captured the enemy's works south of Hatcher's Run. The general and staff now rode out to the front, as it was necessary to give immediate direction to the actual movements of the troops, and prevent confusion from the overlapping and intermingling of the several corps as they pushed forward. He urge
We have but a few hours of daylight left us. My cavalry are rapidly exhausting their ammunition, and if the attack is delayed much longer they may have none left. And then another batch of staff-officers was sent out to gallop through the mud and hurry up the columns. At four o'clock the formation was completed, the order for the assault was given, and the struggle for Pickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from left to right as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the right of the line, Munford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher's Run, to guard the trains. I rode to the front, in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. Ayres threw out a skirmish-line and advanced across an open field which sloped down gradually toward the dense woods just north of the White Oa
. on the Five Forks road not far from J. Boisseau's house. Ayres had his division on this road, having arrived about daylighn ground near the church, and form in order of battle, with Ayres on the left, Crawford on his right, and Griffin in rear as ront, in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. Ayres threw out a skirmAyres threw out a skirmish-line and advanced across an open field which sloped down gradually toward the dense woods just north of the White Oak roae galloping back to join in the general scrimmage. Soon Ayres's men met with a heavy fire on their left flank, and had tobe a sorry soldier who could help following such a leader. Ayres and his officers were equally exposing themselves at all poadied, for such troops could suffer but a momentary check. Ayres, with drawn saber, rushed forward once more with his vetera had moved off in a northerly direction, marching away from Ayres, and leaving a gap between the two divisions. Sheridan bec
nts at Five Forks, which seemed likely. While we were talking, General Warren, who had accompanied Crawford's division, rode up and reported r one of its division commanders, you are authorized to relieve General Warren and order him to report to him [General Grant] at headquarters.t of his line to protect that flank. Orders were at once given to Warren's corps to move up the Gravelly Run Church road to the open ground uard the trains. I rode to the front, in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. Ayres tan became exceedingly annoyed at this circumstance, complained that Warren was not giving sufficient personal supervision to the infantry, andre. I went in the direction of Crawford's division, on our right. Warren, whose personal gallantry was always conspicuous, had had his horseLee's army in the morning. He said to me that he had just relieved Warren, and placed Griffin in command of the Fifth Corps. I had been send
Get right along, now. Oh, drop your guns; you'll never need them any more. You'll all be safe over there. Are there any more of you? We want every one of you fellows. Nearly 1500 were captured at the angle. An orderly here came up to Sheridan, saluted, and said: Colonel Forsyth of your staff is killed, sir. It's no such thing! cried Sheridan. I don't believe a word of it. You'll find Forsyth's all right. Ten minutes later Forsyth rode up. He had been mistaken for the gallant General Winthrop, who had fallen in the assault. Sheridan did not even seem surprised when he saw Forsyth, and merely said: There; I told you so. This incident is mentioned as illustrative of a peculiar trait of Sheridan's character, which never allowed him to be disturbed by camp rumors, however disastrous. The dismounted cavalry had assaulted as soon as they heard the infantry fire open. The natty cavalrymen, with their tight-fitting jackets, and short carbines, swarmed through the pine thicket
ch of staff-officers was sent out to gallop through the mud and hurry up the columns. At four o'clock the formation was completed, the order for the assault was given, and the struggle for Pickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from left to right as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the right of the line, Munford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher's Run, to guard the trains. I rode to the front, in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. Ayres threw out a skirmish-line and advanced across an open field which sloped down gradually toward the dense woods just north of the White Oak road. He soon met with a fire from the edge of these woods, a number of men fell, and the skirmish-line halted and seemed to waver. Sheridan now began to exhibit those traits which a
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