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itted to make a general attack on the enemy. Sheridan told him he didn't believe he had ammunition he skirmish-line halted and seemed to waver. Sheridan now began to exhibit those traits which alway Read made famous for all time by his poem of Sheridan's ride. The roads were muddy, the fields swailes without breaking his own neck as well as Sheridan's. This historic horse derived his name from diate front whose legs had not saved him. Sheridan spurred Rienzi up to the angle, and with a boand leaving a gap between the two divisions. Sheridan became exceedingly annoyed at this circumstaniving the general result of the round-up. Sheridan had that day fought one of the most interesting listened attentively to the description of Sheridan's day's work, the general, with scarcely a woch with his division at midnight to reinforce Sheridan and enable him to make a stand against Lee in front. A cheering despatch was also sent to Sheridan, winding up with the words: I think nothing i[24 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 28
nt, and to the evident amusement of those about him. Badeau, in his Military history of Ulysses S. Grant, says in referring to this scene: The bearer of the good news was Colonel Horace Porter, onof the enemy, for that is just the way they would be commenting on his head in their reports. Grant was anxious to have the different commands move against the enemy's lines at once to prevent Lee as I expect, we will have broken through the rebel lines in fifteen minutes from the word go. Grant was highly pleased with the spirit evinced in these messages, and said: I like the way Wright tavigor. Congratulations were rapidly exchanged, and both went to pushing forward the good work. Grant, after taking in the situation, directed both Meade and Ord to face their commands more toward nd from the north side of the James, and with these troops reinforced his extreme right. General Grant dismounted near a farm-house which stood on a knoll, from which he could get a good view of
mounted cavalry had assaulted as soon as they heard the infantry fire open. The natty cavalrymen, with their tight-fitting jackets, and short carbines, swarmed through the pine thickets and dense undergrowth, looking as if they had been especially equipped for crawling through knot-holes. The cavalry commanded by the gallant Merritt made a final dash, went over the earthworks with a hurrah, captured a battery of artillery, and scattered everything in front of them. Here Custer, Devin, Fitzhugh, and the other cavalry leaders were in their element, and vied with each other in deeds of valor. Crawford's division had moved off in a northerly direction, marching away from Ayres, and leaving a gap between the two divisions. Sheridan became exceedingly annoyed at this circumstance, complained that Warren was not giving sufficient personal supervision to the infantry, and sent nearly all his staff-officers to the Fifth Corps to see that the mistakes made were corrected. After the cap
enthusiasm, and having in them a ring of the true soldierly metal. Ord said he would go into the enemy's works as a hot knife goes into buts now sweeping down from the west. All now looks highly favorable. Ord is engaged, but I have not yet heard the result in his front. A che your force from the west to finish up the job on this side. Soon Ord was heard from as having broken through the intrenchments. Humphrey most of the garrison. At 8:30 A. M. a despatch was brought in from Ord saying that some of his troops had just captured the enemy's works swork. Grant, after taking in the situation, directed both Meade and Ord to face their commands more toward the east, and close up toward thdecided that these should be stormed, and about one o'clock three of Ord's brigades swept down upon Fort Gregg. The garrison of 300 men, comstruggle continued, but nothing could stand against the onslaught of Ord's troops, flushed with their morning's victory. By half-past 2 57 o
George H. Steuart (search for this): chapter 28
but a few hours of daylight left us. My cavalry are rapidly exhausting their ammunition, and if the attack is delayed much longer they may have none left. And then another batch of staff-officers was sent out to gallop through the mud and hurry up the columns. At four o'clock the formation was completed, the order for the assault was given, and the struggle for Pickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from left to right as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the right of the line, Munford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher's Run, to guard the trains. I rode to the front, in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. Ayres threw out a skirmish-line and advanced across an open field which sloped down gradually toward the dense woods just north of the White Oak road.
McGonnigle (search for this): chapter 28
n now rushed into the midst of the broken lines, and cried out: Where is my battle-flag? As the sergeant who carried it rode up, Sheridan seized the crimson-and-white standard, waved it above his head, cheered on the men, and made heroic efforts to close up the ranks. Bullets were now humming like a swarm of bees about our heads, and shells were crashing through the ranks. A musket-ball pierced the battle-flag; another killed the sergeant who had carried it; another wounded an aide, Captain McGonnigle, in the side; others struck two or three of the staff-officers' horses. All this time Sheridan was dashing from one point of the line to another, waving his flag, shaking his fist, encouraging, entreating, threatening, praying, swearing, the true personification of chivalry, the very incarnation of battle. It would be a sorry soldier who could help following such a leader. Ayres and his officers were equally exposing themselves at all points in rallying the men; and soon the line wa
Horace Porter (search for this): chapter 28
apping him on the back with my hand, to his no little astonishment, and to the evident amusement of those about him. Badeau, in his Military history of Ulysses S. Grant, says in referring to this scene: The bearer of the good news was Colonel Horace Porter, one of the most abstemious men in the army; but he came up with so much enthusiasm, clapping the general-in-chief on the back, and otherwise demonstrating his joy, that the officer who shared his tent rebuked him at night for indulging too freely in drink at this critical juncture. But Porter had tasted neither wine nor spirits that day. He was only drunk with victory. -Editor. The general, as might have been expected; asked his usual question: How many prisoners have been taken I was happy to report that the prisoners this time were estimated at over five thousand, and this was the only part of my recital that seemed to call forth a responsive expression from his impassive features. After having listened attentively to the d
Ord said he would go into the enemy's works as a hot knife goes into butter. Wright sent word that when he started in he would make the fur fly, and said: If the chly pleased with the spirit evinced in these messages, and said: I like the way Wright talks; it argues success. I heartily approve. The hour for the general assae could give general directions. At a quarter past five a message came from Wright that he had carried the enemy's line in his front and was pushing in. Next cameote a telegram with his own hand to Mr. Lincoln at City Point, as follows: Both Wright and Parke got through the enemy's line. The battle now rages furiously. Sheri several corps as they pushed forward. He urged his horse over the works which Wright's corps had captured, and suddenly came upon a body of 3000 prisoners marching d great curiosity to get a good look at him. Next he came up with a division of Wright's corps, flushed with success, and rushing forward with a dash that was inspiri
onger they may have none left. And then another batch of staff-officers was sent out to gallop through the mud and hurry up the columns. At four o'clock the formation was completed, the order for the assault was given, and the struggle for Pickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from left to right as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the rightw snatched up his musket, and rushed forward a dozen paces before he fell, never to rise again. The line of battle of weather-beaten veterans was now moving right along down the slope toward the woods with a steady swing that boded no good for Pickett's command, earthworks or no earthworks. Sheridan was mounted on his favorite black horse, Rienzi, which had carried him from Winchester to Cedar Creek, and which Buchanan Read made famous for all time by his poem of Sheridan's ride. The roads
A. H. Terry (search for this): chapter 28
rning. We have but a few hours of daylight left us. My cavalry are rapidly exhausting their ammunition, and if the attack is delayed much longer they may have none left. And then another batch of staff-officers was sent out to gallop through the mud and hurry up the columns. At four o'clock the formation was completed, the order for the assault was given, and the struggle for Pickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from left to right as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the right of the line, Munford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher's Run, to guard the trains. I rode to the front, in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. Ayres threw out a skirmish-line and advanced across an open field which sloped down gradually toward the dense woods just north of the W
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