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Dan McCook (search for this): chapter 14
probabilities of such a course on the part of the enemy, I thought McCook should be made acquainted with what was going on, so Sill and I wenmy ground as long as possible, and until, under directions from General McCook, I moved to the front from my left flank and attached myself toeneral Sheridan, commanding the third and remaining division of General McCook's corps. The enemy's right was strongly posted on a ridge of red and wounded-but few missing. When we came into the open ground, McCook directed Roberts's brigade-now commanded by Colonel Luther P. Bradl Seventythird and Eighty-eighth Illinois had already been placed by McCook. The day had cost me much anxiety and sadness, and I was sorely dision. Late in the evening General Rosecrans, accompanied by General McCook, and several other officers whose names I am now unable to reca; and notwithstanding the fact that on the afternoon of December 30 McCook received information that the right of Johnson's division resting n
l McCook, and several other officers whose names I am now unable to recall, rode by my headquarters on their way to the rear to look for a new line of battle — on Overall's creek it was said — that would preserve our communications with Nashville and offer better facilities for resistance than the one we were now holding. Considerd to be starting its bivouac fires at the moment. The fires and the supposed movements had no weight, therefore, in deciding the proposition to take up a line at Overall's creek, but General Rosecrans, fortunately for the army, decided to remain where he was. Doubtless reflections during his ride caused him to realize that the enemy must be quite as much crippled as himself. If it had been decided to fall back to Overall's creek, we could have withdrawn without much difficulty very likely, but such a retrograde movement would have left to the enemy the entire battle-field of Stone River and ultimately compelled our retreat to Nashville. In the night of
ois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A. Schmitt. Forty-Second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Fifty-First Illinois (1), Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Fifty-First Illinois(2), Captain Henry F. Wescott. artillery: Captain Henry Hescock. First Illinois Battery, C. Captain Charles Houghtaling. Fourth Indiana Battery, Captain Asahel K, Bush. First Missouri Battery, G. Captain Henry Hescock. Battery C was attached to the Third Brigade; Fourth Indiana Battery to the First Brigade; and Battery G, First Missouri, to the Second Brigade. Of this number I lost 1,633 killed, wounded, and missing, or nearly 40 per cent. In the remaining years of the war, though often engaged in most severe contests, I never experienced in any of my commands so high a rate of casualties. The ratio of loss in the whole of Rosecrans's army
William A. Schmitt (search for this): chapter 14
William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A. Schmitt. Forty-Second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Fifty-First Illinois (1), Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Fifty-First Illinois(2), Captain Henry F. Wescott. artillery: Captain Henry Hescock. First Illinois Battery, C. Captain Charles Houghtaling. Fourth Indiana Battery, Captain Asahel K, Bush. First Missouri Battery, G. Captain Henry Hescock. Battery C was attached to the Third Brigade; Fourth Indiana Battery to the First Brigade; and Battery G, First Missouri, to the
ick up about a hundred prisoners. From this time till the evening of January 3 Bragg's left remained in our front, and continued to show itself at intervals by weak demonstrations, which we afterward ascertained were directly intended to cover the desperate assault he made with Breckenridge on the left of Rosecrans, an assault that really had in view only a defensive purpose, for unless Bragg dislodged the troops which were now massing in front of his right he would be obliged to withdraw General Polk's corps behind Stone River and finally abandon Murfreesboroa. The sequel proved this to be the case; and the ill-judged assault led by Breckenridge ending in entire defeat, Bragg retired from Murfreesboroa the night of January 3. General Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboroa on the 4th and 5th, having gained a costly victory, which was not decisive enough in its character to greatly affect the general course of the war, though it somewhat strengthened and increased our hold on Middle Ten
Lovell H. Rousseau (search for this): chapter 14
s, who fell while gallantly attempting to rally his men about opposite the centre of my line. A lull followed the third fierce assault, and an investigation showed that, with the exception of a few rounds in my brigade, our ammunition was entirely exhausted; and while it was apparent that the enemy was reluctant to renew the conflict in my front, yet I was satisfied I could not hold on much longer without the danger of ultimate capture, so I prepared to withdraw as soon as the troops of Rousseau's division, which had been ordered to take up a line on my right, came into position. Schaefer's and Sill's brigades being without a cartridge, I directed them to fix bayonets for a charge, and await any attempt of the enemy to embarrass my retreat, while Roberts's brigade, offering such resistance as its small quantity of ammunition would permit, was pulled slowly in toward the Nashville pike. Eighty of the horses of Houghtaling's battery having been killed, an attempt was made to bring h
William A. Presson (search for this): chapter 14
usel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A
Frederick Schaefer (search for this): chapter 14
ich I was able to take up a new position with Schaefer's and Sill's brigades on the commanding groun a heavy fire we succeeded in this manoeuvre, Schaefer's brigade marching first, then the batteries,tery in the angle. This presented Sill's and Schaefer's brigades in an almost opposite direction tofice of my command, so I informed Roberts and Schaefer that we must be prepared to meet the demand oe up a line on my right, came into position. Schaefer's and Sill's brigades being without a cartrids killed; a little later I lost my fourth-Colonel Schaefer. The difficulties of withdrawing wereight of General Palmer's division; and two of Schaefer's regiments, having obtained ammunition, wererry Wood's position. It was here that I lost Schaefer, who was killed instantly, making my fourth b loss of my brigade commanders-Sill, Roberts, Schaefer, and Harrington-and a large number of regimensha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laib
Henry F. Wescott (search for this): chapter 14
eber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A. Schmitt. Forty-Second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Fifty-First Illinois (1), Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Fifty-First Illinois(2), Captain Henry F. Wescott. artillery: Captain Henry Hescock. First Illinois Battery, C. Captain Charles Houghtaling. Fourth Indiana Battery, Captain Asahel K, Bush. First Missouri Battery, G. Captain Henry Hescock. Battery C was attached to the Third Brigade; Fourth Indiana Battery to the First Brigade; and Battery G, First Missouri, to the Second Brigade. Of this number I lost 1,633 killed, wounded, and missing, or nearly 40 per cent. In the remaining years of the war, though often engaged in most sev
Henry H. Withers (search for this): chapter 14
en in vain. Indeed, the bravery and tenacity of my division gave to Rosecrans the time required to make new dispositions, and exacted from our foes the highest commendations. [extract from report of Lieutenant-General L. Polk.] Major-General Withers's left was opposed to the right of General Sheridan, commanding the third and remaining division of General McCook's corps. The enemy's right was strongly posted on a ridge of rocks, with chasms intervening, and covered with a dense growugh cedars. Being advised of the attack he was to expect by the fierce contest which was being waged on his right, he was fully prepared for the onset, and this notice and the strength of his position enabled him to offer a strong resistance to Withers, whose duty it was to move next. Extract from report of Brigadier-General A. P. Stewart: The force we engaged in this famous cedar brake was composed, at least in part, of regulars. Some of the prisoners and wounded men stated that they belo
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