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condition, was naturally disheartening. The men had been made veterans, however, by the fortunes and misfortunes of the day, and as they went into their new places still confident of final success, it was plain to see that they felt a self-confidence inspired by the part they had already played. My headquarters were now established on the Nashville pike, about three miles and a half from Murfreesboroa; my division being aligned to the west of the pike, bowed out and facing almost west, Cleburn's division of the Confederates confronting it. Davis's division was posted on my right, and Walker's brigade of Thomas's corps, which had reported to me, took up a line that connected my left with Johnson's division. Late in the evening General Rosecrans, accompanied by General McCook, and several other officers whose names I am now unable to recall, rode by my headquarters on their way to the rear to look for a new line of battle — on Overall's creek it was said — that would preserve o
Philip H. Sheridan (search for this): chapter 14
been read to the command an order from army headquarters dismissing the four from the service, the scene was brought to a close by drumming the cowards out of camp. It was a mortifying spectacle, but from that day no officer in that division ever abandoned his colors. My effective force in the battle of Stone River was 4,154 officers and men. battle of Stone River (Murfreesboroa), Tenn., December, 1862, January, 1863 Third division: (Right Wing, Fourteenth Army Corps) Brigadier-General Philip H. Sheridan. escort: Second Kentucky Cavalry, Co. L. Lieutenant Joseph T. Forman. first brigade: (1) Brigadier-General Joshua W. Sill. (2) Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second br<
until, under directions from General McCook, I moved to the front from my left flank and attached myself to the right of Negley's division, which up to this hour had been left almost undisturbed by the enemy in the line it had taken up the night befbatteries, and Roberts's and Sill's brigades following. When my division arrived on this new ground, I posted Roberts on Negley's right, with Hescock's and Bush's guns, the brigade and guns occupying a low rocky ridge of limestone, which faced them aefer's brigades in an almost opposite direction to the line we had so confidently taken up the night before, and covered Negley's rear. The enemy, in the meantime, had continued his wheeling movement till he occupied the ground that my batteries anetting projectiles, that rebounded again and again over the thinly covered limestone formation and sped on to the rear of Negley. But all his efforts to dislodge or destroy us were futile, and for the first time since daylight General Hardee was ser
William P. Carlin (search for this): chapter 14
scock's and Houghtaling's batteries had been posted all the morning. The general course of this new position was at right angles with my original line, and it took the shape of an obtuse angle, with my three batteries at the apex. Davis, and Carlin of his division, endeavored to rally their men here on my right, but their efforts were practically unavailing, though the calm and cool appearance of Carlin, who at the time was smoking a stumpy pipe, had some effect, and was in strong contrast Carlin, who at the time was smoking a stumpy pipe, had some effect, and was in strong contrast to the excited manner of Davis, who seemed overpowered by the disaster that had befallen his command. But few could be rallied, however, as the men were badly demoralized, and most of them fell back beyond the Wilkinson pike, where they reorganized behind the troops of General Thomas. At this juncture the enemy's turning-column began advancing again in concert with Cheatham's division, and as the extreme left of the Confederates was directed on Griscom's house, and their right on the Blanto
Luther P. Bradley (search for this): chapter 14
ken ranks, thinned by only its killed and wounded-but few missing. When we came into the open ground, McCook directed Roberts's brigade-now commanded by Colonel Luther P. Bradley--to proceed a short distance to the rear on the Nashville pike, to repel the enemy's threatening attempt at our communications. Willingly and cheerfullyor Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonearrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A. Schmitt. Forty-Second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Fifty-First Illinois (1), Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Fifty-First Illinois(2), Captain Henry F. Wescott. artillery: Captain Henry Hescock. First Illinois Battery, C. Captain Charles Houghtaling. Fourth In
John Weber (search for this): chapter 14
Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A. Schmitt. Forty-Second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Fifty-First Illinois (1), Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Fifty-First Illinois(
W. S. Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 14
ived during the night revealed the fact that Rosecrans intended to attack by throwing his left on t the early assault which was to be made from Rosecrans's left would anticipate and check the design his first attack, I received a message from Rosecrans telling me that he was making new dispositioalmer, and only a desultory contest ensued. Rosecrans, whom I now met in the open ground west of t I had formed to help Wood, I was ordered by Rosecrans to prepare to make a charge should the enemya momentary expression of horror spread over Rosecrans's face; but at such a time the importance ofult he made with Breckenridge on the left of Rosecrans, an assault that really had in view only a dsualties. The ratio of loss in the whole of Rosecrans's army was also high, and Bragg's losses weras concerned the result on the battlefield. Rosecrans seems to have planned the battle with the idederates was not threatened by the design of Rosecrans; and Bragg, without risk to his communicatio[10 more...]
Silas Miller (search for this): chapter 14
colors. My effective force in the battle of Stone River was 4,154 officers and men. battle of Stone River (Murfreesboroa), Tenn., December, 1862, January, 1863 Third division: (Right Wing, Fourteenth Army Corps) Brigadier-General Philip H. Sheridan. escort: Second Kentucky Cavalry, Co. L. Lieutenant Joseph T. Forman. first brigade: (1) Brigadier-General Joshua W. Sill. (2) Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2),
Francis Swanwick (search for this): chapter 14
Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A. Schmitt. Forty-Second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Fifty-First Illinois (1), Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Fifty-First Illinois(2), Captain Henry F. Wescott. artillery: Captain Henry Hescock. First Illinois Battery, C. Captain Charles Houghtaling. Fourth Indiana Battery, Captain Asahel K, Bush. Fir
ke stillness prevailing in the cedars to our front. Shortly after daylight General Hardee opened the engagement, just as Sill had predicted, by a fierce attack on Jothe extreme right of the Union line. Immediate success attending this assault, Hardee extended the attack gradually along in front of Davis, his movement taking the orward in conjunction with the wheeling movement under the immediate command of Hardee. One of the most sanguinary contests of the day now took place. In fulfillmenign no doubt, Cheatham's division attacked on my left, while heavy masses under Hardee, covered by batteries posted on the high ground formerly occupied by my guns, ao dislodge or destroy us were futile, and for the first time since daylight General Hardee was seriously checked in the turning movement he had begun for the purpose d up with the spirit which characterized its beginning the successful attack by Hardee on our right wing-and there seems no reason why he should not have done so-the
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