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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. Search the whole document.

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January, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 14
who also cut from their coats every insignia of rank. Then, after there had been read to the command an order from army headquarters dismissing the four from the service, the scene was brought to a close by drumming the cowards out of camp. It was a mortifying spectacle, but from that day no officer in that division ever abandoned his colors. My effective force in the battle of Stone River was 4,154 officers and men. battle of Stone River (Murfreesboroa), Tenn., December, 1862, January, 1863 Third division: (Right Wing, Fourteenth Army Corps) Brigadier-General Philip H. Sheridan. escort: Second Kentucky Cavalry, Co. L. Lieutenant Joseph T. Forman. first brigade: (1) Brigadier-General Joshua W. Sill. (2) Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel Wil<
December 30th (search for this): chapter 14
in Kentucky, renewed the drooping spirits of the East Tennesseans, and demoralized the disunionists in Middle Tennessee; yet it was a negative victory so far as concerned the result on the battlefield. Rosecrans seems to have planned the battle with the idea that the enemy would continue passive, remain entirely on the defensive, and that it was necessary only to push forward our left in order to force the evacuation of Murfreesboroa; and notwithstanding the fact that on the afternoon of December 30 McCook received information that the right of Johnson's division resting near the Franklin pike, extended only to about the centre of the Confederate army, it does not appear that attack from that quarter was at all apprehended by the Union commanders. The natural line of retreat of the Confederates was not threatened by the design of Rosecrans; and Bragg, without risk to his communications, anticipated it by a counter-attack of like character from his own left, and demolished his adv
During the evening of the 30th, feeling keenly all the solicitude which attends one in anticipation of a battle, I examined my position with great care, inspecting its whole length several times to remedy any defects that might exist, and to let the men see that I was alive to their interests and advantages. After dark, I went back to the rear of my reserve brigade, and establishing my headquarters behind the trunk of a large fallen tree, which would shelter me somewhat from the cold December wind, lay down beside a small camp-fire to get some rest. At 2 o'clock on the morning of the 31st General Sill came back to me to report that on his front a continuous movement of infantry and artillery had been going on all night within the Confederate lines, and that he was convinced that Bragg was massing on our right with the purpose of making an attack from that direction early in the morning. After discussing for a few minutes the probabilities of such a course on the part of the
y behind Duck River to Shelbyville and Tullahoma-and but little endeavor was made to follow him. Indeed, we were not in condition to pursue, even if it had been the intention at the outset of the campaign. As soon as possible after the Confederate retreat I went over the battle-field to collect such of my wounded as had not been carried off to the South and to bury my dead. In the cedars and on the ground where I had been so fiercely assaulted when the battle opened on the morning of the 31st, evidences of the bloody struggle appeared on every hand in the form of broken fire-arms, fragments of accoutrements, and splintered trees. The dead had nearly all been left unburied, but as there was likelihood of their mutilation by roving swine, the bodies had mostly been collected in piles at different points and inclosed by rail fences. The sad duties of interment and of caring for the wounded were completed by the 5th, and on the 6th I moved my division three miles south of Murfreesb
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