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ted to me with twelve hundred mounted men. Having heard during the night that the enemy had halted on the mountain near the University — an educational establishment on the summit — I directed Watkins to make a reconnoissance and find out the value of the information. He learned that Wharton's brigade of cavalry was halted at the University to cover a moderately large force of the enemy's infantry which had not yet got down the mountain on the other side, so I pushed Watkins out again on the 5th, supporting him by a brigade of infantry, which I accompanied myself. We were too late, however, for when we arrived at the top of the mountain Wharton had disappeared, and though Watkins pursued to Bridgeport, he was able to do nothing more, and on his return reported that the last of the enemy had crossed the Tennessee River and burned the railroad bridge. Nothing further could now be done, so I instructed Watkins to rejoin the division at Cowan, and being greatly fatigued by the hard
January 9th (search for this): chapter 15
osure, I doubt if, even with these marks of campaigning, she could have deceived as readily as did her companion. How the two got acquainted I never learned, and though they had joined the army independently of each other, yet an intimacy had sprung up between them long before the mishaps of the foraging expedition. They both were forwarded to army headquarters, and, when provided with clothing suited to their sex, sent back to Nashville, and thence beyond our lines to Louisville. On January 9, by an order from the War Department, the Army of the Cumberland had been divided into three corps, designated the Fourteenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-first. This order did not alter the composition of the former grand divisions, nor change the commanders, but the new nomenclature was a decided improvement over the clumsy designations Right Wing, Centre, and Left Wing, which were well calculated to lead to confusion sometimes. McCook's wing became the Twentieth Corps, and my division conti
where operations against him ceased; for, in consequence of the incessant rains of the season, the streams had become almost impassable. Later, I returned by way of Franklin to my old camp at Murfreesboroa, passing over on this march the ground on which the Confederate General Hood met with such disaster the following year in his attack on Stanley's corps. My command had all returned from the Franklin expedition to Murfreesboroa and gone into camp on the Salem pike by the latter part of March, from which time till June it took part in only the little affairs of outposts occurring every now and then on my own front. In the meanwhile General Rosecrans had been materially reinforced by the return of sick and wounded men; his army had become well disciplined, and was tolerably supplied; and he was repeatedly pressed by the authorities at Washington to undertake offensive operations. During the spring and early summer Rosecrans resisted, with a great deal of spirit and on various
ure was a decided improvement over the clumsy designations Right Wing, Centre, and Left Wing, which were well calculated to lead to confusion sometimes. McCook's wing became the Twentieth Corps, and my division continued of the same organization, and held the same number as formerly — the Third Division, Twentieth Corps. My first brigade was now commanded by Brigadier-General William H. Lytle, the second by Colonel Bernard Laiboldt, and the third by Colonel Luther P. Bradley. On the 4th of March I was directed to move in light marching order toward Franklin and join General Gordon Granger, to take part in some operations which he was projecting against General Earl Van Dorn, then at Spring Hill. Knowing that my line of march would carry me through a region where forage was plentiful, I took along a large train of empty wagons, which I determined to fill with corn and send back to Murfreesboroa, believing that I could successfully cover the train by Minty's brigade of cavalry, wh
aily for the work. Much attention was also given to creating a more perfect system of guard and picket duty — a matter that had hitherto been somewhat neglected in the army, as its constant activity had permitted scant opportunity for the development of such a system. It was at this time that I received my appointment as a majorgeneral of Volunteers. My promotion had been recommended by General Rosecrans immediately after the battle of Stone River, but for some reason it was delayed until April, and though a long time elapsed between the promise and the performance, my gratification was extreme. My scout, Card, was exceedingly useful while encamped near Murfreesboroa, making several trips to East Tennessee within the enemy's lines to collect information as to the condition of the loyal people there, and to encourage them with the hope of early liberation. He also brought back from each trip very accurate statements as to the strength and doings of the Confederate army, fixing
l Hood met with such disaster the following year in his attack on Stanley's corps. My command had all returned from the Franklin expedition to Murfreesboroa and gone into camp on the Salem pike by the latter part of March, from which time till June it took part in only the little affairs of outposts occurring every now and then on my own front. In the meanwhile General Rosecrans had been materially reinforced by the return of sick and wounded men; his army had become well disciplined, and wring the spring and early summer Rosecrans resisted, with a great deal of spirit and on various grounds, these frequent urgings, and out of this grew up an acrimonious correspondence and strained feeling between him and General Halleck. Early in June, however, stores had been accumulated and other preparations made for a move forward, Rosecrans seeming to have decided that he could safely risk an advance, with the prospect of good results. Before finally deciding, he called upon most of his c
headquarters, leading to the conviction that Rosecrans originated the Tullahoma campaign, and the record of his prior performances collaterally sustains the visible evidence then existing. In my opinion, then, based on a clear recollection of various occurrences growing out of our intimacy, he conceived the plan of the Tullahoma campaign and the one succeeding it; and is therefore entitled to every credit that attended their execution, no matter what may be claimed for others. On the 23d of June Bragg was covering his position north of Duck River with a front extending from McMinnville, where his cavalry rested, through Wartrace and Shelbyville to Columbia, his depot being at Tullahoma. Rosecrans, thinking that Bragg would offer strong resistance at Shelbyville — which was somewhat protected by a spur of low mountains or hills, offshoots of the Cumberland Mountains-decided to turn that place; consequently, he directed the mass of the Union army on the enemy's right flank, about
ce and Shelbyville to Columbia, his depot being at Tullahoma. Rosecrans, thinking that Bragg would offer strong resistance at Shelbyville — which was somewhat protected by a spur of low mountains or hills, offshoots of the Cumberland Mountains-decided to turn that place; consequently, he directed the mass of the Union army on the enemy's right flank, about Manchester. On the 26th of June McCook's corps advanced toward Liberty Gap, my division MIDDLE Tennessee or Tullahoma campaign, June 24 to July 5, 1863. Third division: (Twentieth Corps Army of the Cumberland.) Major-General Philip H. Sheridan. first brigade: Brigadier-General William H. Lytle. Thirty-Sixth Illinois, Colonel Silas Miller. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Charles H. Larrabee. Twenty-First Michigan, Colonel William B. McCreery. Second brigade: Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri, Major Arnold Beck. Fifteenth Missouri, Colonel Joseph Conrad. Forty-Fo
position north of Duck River with a front extending from McMinnville, where his cavalry rested, through Wartrace and Shelbyville to Columbia, his depot being at Tullahoma. Rosecrans, thinking that Bragg would offer strong resistance at Shelbyville — which was somewhat protected by a spur of low mountains or hills, offshoots of the Cumberland Mountains-decided to turn that place; consequently, he directed the mass of the Union army on the enemy's right flank, about Manchester. On the 26th of June McCook's corps advanced toward Liberty Gap, my division MIDDLE Tennessee or Tullahoma campaign, June 24 to July 5, 1863. Third division: (Twentieth Corps Army of the Cumberland.) Major-General Philip H. Sheridan. first brigade: Brigadier-General William H. Lytle. Thirty-Sixth Illinois, Colonel Silas Miller. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Charles H. Larrabee. Twenty-First Michigan, Colonel William B. McCreery. Second brigade: Colo
force. As soon as the head of Brannan's column arrived I marched across-country to the left, and encamped that night at the little town of Millersburg, in the vicinity of Liberty Gap. I was directed to move from Millersburg, on Hoover's Gap — a pass in the range of hills already referred to, through which ran the turnpike from Murfreesboroa to Manchester-but heavy rains had made the country roads almost impassable, and the last of my division did not reach Hoover's Gap till the morning of June 27, after its abandonment by the enemy. Continuing on to Fairfield, the head of my column met, south of that place, a small force of Confederate infantry and cavalry, which after a slight skirmish Laiboldt's brigade drove back toward Wartrace. The next morning I arrived at Manchester, where I remained quiet for the day. Early on the 29th I marched by the Lynchburg road for Tullahoma, where the enemy was believed to be in force, and came into position about six miles from the town. By the
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