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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. Search the whole document.

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Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 20
tions, and nearly all the medical stores of General Lee's army, which had been moved from Orange Court House either because Lee wished to have them directly in his rear or because he contemplated fad now been executed. They were to break up General Lee's railroad communications, destroy such depderate mounted force. Under him the cavalry of Lee's army had been nurtured, and had acquired suche of his staff entered and spoke of Stuart, General Lee said: I can scarcely think of him without warket that the enemy's cavalry was returning to Lee's Army I started that evening on my return marc particularly as I knew that reinforcements for Lee had come up from the south to Richmond, and tha gone there from Richmond en route to reinforce Lee. In the face of this impediment Custer's missiog parties sent toward Hanover Court House, that Lee had been forced from his position near Spottsylth realizing that our operations in the rear of Lee had disconcerted and alarmed that general so mu[8 more...]
James B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 20
re and right from the field. Gregg meanwhile, with equal success, charged the force in his rear-Gordon's brigade-and the engagement ended by giving us complete control of the road to Richmond. We cas on both sides were quite severe, General Stuart himself falling mortally wounded, and General James B. Gordon, one of his brigade commanders, being killed. After Custer's charge, the Confederatst compel us to return by the same route we had taken in coming, in which case we would run into Gordon's brigade, but the signal repulse of Bragg's infantry dispelled these illusions. Even had it three brigades of veterans and about five thousand irregulars on my front and right flank, with Gordon's cavalry in the rear, and Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry on my left flank, holding the Chickahominy andd the complete repulse of the enemy's infantry, which assailed us from his intrenchments, and of Gordon's cavalry, which pressed Gregg on the Brook road, ended the contest in our favor. The rest of t
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 20
eneral Custer's brilliant charge death of General Stuart removing torpedoes excitement in Richmont March enterprising newsboys the effects of Stuart's defeat and death end of the first expeditioe battle of Yellow Tavern and the death of General Stuart started from the vicinity of Aldrich's towNorth Anna placed beyond doubt. Meanwhile General Stuart had discovered what we were about, and he interpose between my column and Richmond. Stuart had hardly united his troops near Beaver Dam wasualties on both sides were quite severe, General Stuart himself falling mortally wounded, and Genet important of all, however, was the defeat of Stuart. Since the beginning of the war this general effect on the Confederate cause the defeat of Stuart was most disheartening, but his death was eveny. When one of his staff entered and spoke of Stuart, General Lee said: I can scarcely think of himIn this view they were and are in error. When Stuart was defeated the main purpose of my instructio[9 more...]
Russell Jones (search for this): chapter 20
ur wounded were quickly and kindly cared for by his surgeons. Ample supplies, also, in the way of forage and rations, were furnished us by general Butler, and the work of refitting for our return to the Army of the Potomac was vigorously pushed. By the 17th all was ready, and having learned by scouting parties sent in the direction of Richmond and as far as Newmarket that the enemy's cavalry was returning to Lee's Army I started that evening on my return march, crossing the Chickahominy at Jones's bridge, and bivouacking on the 19th near Baltimore crossroads. My uncertainty of what had happened to the army of the Potomac in our absence, and as to where I should find it, made our getting back a problem somewhat difficult of solution, particularly as I knew that reinforcements for Lee had come up from the south to Richmond, and that most likely some of these troops were being held at different points on the route to intercept my column. Therefore I determined to pass the Pamunkey
John S. Cooke (search for this): chapter 20
uired such prestige that it thought itself wellnigh invincible; indeed, in the early years of the war it had proved to be so. This was now dispelled by the successful march we had made in Lee's rear; and the discomfiture of Stuart at Yellow Tavern had inflicted a blow from which entire recovery was impossible. In its effect on the Confederate cause the defeat of Stuart was most disheartening, but his death was even a greater calamity, as is evidenced by the words of a Confederate writer (Cooke), who says: Stuart could be ill spared at this critical moment, and General Lee was plunged into the deepest melancholy at the intelligence of his death. When it reached him he retired from those around him, and remained for some time communing with his own heart and memory. When one of his staff entered and spoke of Stuart, General Lee said: I can scarcely think of him without weeping. From the camp near Gaines's Mills I resumed the march to Haxall's Landing, the point on the James Ri
Thomas C. Devin (search for this): chapter 20
line of battle on that side of the road. Meanwhile the enemy, desperate but still confident, poured in a heavy fire from his line and from a battery which enfiladed the Brook road, and made Yellow Tavern an uncomfortably hot place. Gibbs's and Devin's brigades, however, held fast there, while Custer, supported by Chapman's brigade, attacked the enemy's left and battery in a mounted charge. Custer's charge, with Chapman on his flank and the rest of Wilson's division sustaining him, was brn at full speed rushed at the enemy. At the same moment the dismounted troops along my whole front moved forward, and as Custer went through the battery, capturing two of the guns with their cannoneers and breaking up the enemy's left, Gibbs and Devin drove his centre and right from the field. Gregg meanwhile, with equal success, charged the force in his rear-Gordon's brigade-and the engagement ended by giving us complete control of the road to Richmond. We captured a number of prisoners, an
George H. Chapman (search for this): chapter 20
e but still confident, poured in a heavy fire from his line and from a battery which enfiladed the Brook road, and made Yellow Tavern an uncomfortably hot place. Gibbs's and Devin's brigades, however, held fast there, while Custer, supported by Chapman's brigade, attacked the enemy's left and battery in a mounted charge. Custer's charge, with Chapman on his flank and the rest of Wilson's division sustaining him, was brilliantly executed. Beginning at a walk, he increased his gait to a troChapman on his flank and the rest of Wilson's division sustaining him, was brilliantly executed. Beginning at a walk, he increased his gait to a trot, and then at full speed rushed at the enemy. At the same moment the dismounted troops along my whole front moved forward, and as Custer went through the battery, capturing two of the guns with their cannoneers and breaking up the enemy's left, Gibbs and Devin drove his centre and right from the field. Gregg meanwhile, with equal success, charged the force in his rear-Gordon's brigade-and the engagement ended by giving us complete control of the road to Richmond. We captured a number of pri
W. H. F. Lee (search for this): chapter 20
nless the separate commands in an expedition of this nature are very prompt in movement, and each fully equal to overcoming at once any obstacle it may meet, combinations rarely work out as expected; besides, an engagement was at all times imminent, hence it was specially necessary to keep the whole force well together. As soon as the Ny, Po, and Ta rivers were crossed, each of which streams would have afforded an excellent defensive line to the enemy, all anxiety as to our passing around Lee's army was removed, and our ability to cross the North Anna placed beyond doubt. Meanwhile General Stuart had discovered what we were about, and he set his cavalry in motion, sending General Fitzhugh Lee to follow and attack my rear on the Childsburg road, Stuart himself marching by way of Davenport's bridge, on the North Anna, toward Beaver Dam Station, near which place his whole command was directed to unite the next day. My column having passed the Ta River, Stuart attacked its rear
Henry E. Davies (search for this): chapter 20
permit him to get at least a part of his command in my front; but this scheme was frustrated by Davies's brigade, which I directed to fight as a rear-guard, holding on at one position and then at another along the line of march just enough to deter the enemy from a too rapid advance. Davies performed this responsible and trying duty with tact and good judgment, following the main column steadilyorses were able to obtain a good rest during the night. At 2 o'clock in the morning, May 11, Davies's brigade of Gregg's division marched for Ashland to cut the Fredericksburg railroad. Arriving he head of the enemy's column, which had to pass through this same place to reach Yellow Tavern, Davies drove out a small force occupying the town, burnt a train of cars and a locomotive, destroyed thllow Tavern, Merritt in the lead, Wilson following, and Gregg in the rear. The appearance of Davies's brigade at Ashland in the morning had had the effect of further mystifying the enemy as to my
J. H. Wilson (search for this): chapter 20
North Anna at Anderson's ford, while Gregg and Wilson encamped on the north side, having engaged theAnna. On the morning of the 10th Gregg and Wilson, while crossing the North Anna, were again attthe east of the pike, and I quickly brought up Wilson and one of Gregg's brigades to take advantage m behind their works at Richmond, and attacked Wilson and Gregg. Wilson's troops were driven back iWilson's troops were driven back in some confusion at first; but Gregg, in anticipation of attack, had hidden a heavy line of dismount the enemy to falter, and while still wavering Wilson rallied his men, and turning some of them agai the afternoon I crossed the Chickahominy with Wilson and Gregg, but when we overtook Merritt he had that place; at the same time I sent Gregg and Wilson to Cold Harbor, to demonstrate in the directioridge was made practicable. On the 22d Gregg, Wilson, and Custer returned. The latter had gone on h side of the Chickahominy, but the failure of Wilson's column to get possession of the outwork whic[4 more...]
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