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Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville Our mother and sisters arrive fror five months between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, that is to say, between the middle of De alive. It will be remembered he fell at Chancellorsville. One matter of very great importance ich took shape between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville was the organization of our (Cabell's) baters, by Colonel Cabell himself, prior to Chancellorsville, as above suggested, is very probable, asmatters worthy of note occurring prior to Chancellorsville, it may not be out of place to mention thby the Army of Northern Virginia, that of Chancellorsville stands first as illustrating the consummaSedgwick and Early opposed each other, to Chancellorsville, the position selected by Hooker as the brps, numbering fifty-six thousand men, at Chancellorsville, about ten miles west of Fredericksburg.left against attack from the direction of Chancellorsville, nor did he move southward so as to put h[5 more...]
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ote, and particularly the last clause, to be strongly illustrative of the directness and concentration which rendered her husband oblivious of everything but the one idea at any one time having possession of him. A few days later, but after Jackson's death, my father gave me what I may term the obverse, or face side, of this incident. He was at Jackson's headquarters when the General, as it were in a tone of inquiry, said: Doctor, I understand you have a son in the army? Yes, GJackson's headquarters when the General, as it were in a tone of inquiry, said: Doctor, I understand you have a son in the army? Yes, General, my father answered, I have three of them. One is like you, isn't he? No, sir; I don't know that either of them is specially like me. Then, somewhat impatiently: Well, your oldest son is named Robert, isn't he? Yes, Bob is my eldest son. From what I have heard of him, I think I should like to have him with me. Well, sir, I would be delighted to have him come. But it isn't for you to say, Doctor; he ought to be allowed to decide for himself. Besides, both of
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
as well as from his military history, with which we were familiar, we knew our man. We knew also the atmosphere that surrounded his appointment, but I for one never saw, until long after the war, the remarkable letter of Mr. Lincoln to his appointee, which not only revives and bears out my recollection of the spirit of the times, but fills me with amazement that a self-respectful officer could have accepted an appointment confirmed or accompanied by such a letter: executive mansion, Washington, D. C., January 26, 1863. Major-General Hooker: General:--I have placed you at the head of the Army of the Potomac. Of course I have done this upon what appears to me to be sufficient reasons. And yet I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you. I believe you to be a brave and skilful soldier, which, of course, I like. I also believe you do not mix politics with your profession, in which you are right. You have confide
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville Our mother and sisters arrive from the Norhe right. In the four or five months between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, that is to say, between t very great importance which took shape between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville was the organization of ouh banks of the Rappahannock River, at and below Fredericksburg, both before and after that battle. The communt was twelve miles or more from Deep Run, below Fredericksburg, where Sedgwick and Early opposed each other, te line of hills south of the Rappahannock, near Fredericksburg, was confronted by General Hooker, with the Arm, at Chancellorsville, about ten miles west of Fredericksburg. His purpose was now fully developed to Genera (Couch's) which had been left with Sedgwick at Fredericksburg. It was a critical position for the Confederatext morning we heard firing in the direction of Fredericksburg. It was very foggy, and we could see nothing,
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ismounted in a place of comparative security, just to stretch our limbs and unbend a moment from the awful tension. Leaving his horse, Colonel Cabell walked up to me, color mounting his face and tears filling his eyes, and threw his arms about me, saying in a voice husky with feeling exactly these words: Stiles, if you should dare to get killed, I'd never forgive you. Such was the commanding officer of our battalion. Either at the organization or soon after, Major S. P. Hamilton, of South Carolina, was assigned to duty with the command, and at a later period Major W. H. Gibbes, of the same State, was with us for a few weeks or months. I am not certain as to the date of my first service with the battalion as adjutant. Some of my comrades insist that it was from the inception; but I am sure this is not true, unless, as is possible, I may have been detailed by Colonel Cabell to aid temporarily in arranging matters and getting the new organization in working order. I could not have
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
other and sisters and that Beers had also gotten a furlough to meet them and was in Richmond with us. If so, it was the last time I ever saw the noble fellow alive. It will be remembered he fell at Chancellorsville. One matter of very great importance which took shape between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville was the organization of our (Cabell's) battalion of artillery. It was made up of four batteries-ours, the First Company, Richmond Howitzers, of Virginia; Manly's Battery, of North Carolina; the Troupe Artillery and Frazier's Battery, of Georgia; and it included, at different times, from sixteen to eighteen guns, mostly brass Napoleons. Its commanding officer was Col. H. C. Cabell, a member of the historic and illustrious Virginia family of that name and a man every way worthy of his lineage. For eighteen months of the hottest part of the war I was the adjutant of Colonel Cabell, fighting by his side by day and sleeping by his side by night, eating and drinking often o
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
to meet them and was in Richmond with us. If so, it was the last time I ever saw the noble fellow alive. It will be remembered he fell at Chancellorsville. One matter of very great importance which took shape between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville was the organization of our (Cabell's) battalion of artillery. It was made up of four batteries-ours, the First Company, Richmond Howitzers, of Virginia; Manly's Battery, of North Carolina; the Troupe Artillery and Frazier's Battery, of Georgia; and it included, at different times, from sixteen to eighteen guns, mostly brass Napoleons. Its commanding officer was Col. H. C. Cabell, a member of the historic and illustrious Virginia family of that name and a man every way worthy of his lineage. For eighteen months of the hottest part of the war I was the adjutant of Colonel Cabell, fighting by his side by day and sleeping by his side by night, eating and drinking often out of the same tin cup, lying upon the same oil cloth and c
Deep Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
brilliant genius and audacious courage of Lee and Jackson shone so conspicuously throughout these operations, partly because the plan of their adversary was truly great-far superior to anything that had theretofore been projected against Lee and his staunch soldiers. The battle is of such exceptional interest, and at the same time savors so much of the marvelous, that I ask pardon for making a lengthy quotation from Colonel Taylor's book, premising that it was twelve miles or more from Deep Run, below Fredericksburg, where Sedgwick and Early opposed each other, to Chancellorsville, the position selected by Hooker as the base of his main operations and where he had concentrated the bulk of his army. On pages 83-5 of his Four years with General Lee, Colonel Taylor says: General Lee, with fifty-seven thousand troops of all arms, intrenched along the line of hills south of the Rappahannock, near Fredericksburg, was confronted by General Hooker, with the Army of the Potomac, one h
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
cer should take his battalion in the field. When this feature was developed, for once he flamed into ungovernable rage. It was the only time I ever heard him swear. Stiles, said he, what do these people take me for? Have I given men any reason to consider me a damned sneak and coward and fool? I cannot forbear a trifling incident, revealing in a flash the simplicity and beauty of his nature and of our relations and intercourse. It occurred at the left base of the Bloody Angle at Spottsylvania in 1864, where one or two of his batteries had been ordered to take the place of some of our artillery which had been captured, and to stay the rout. The guns were in column back of the lines, awaiting our return, we having ridden into that gloomy pit of defeat and demoralization to determine exactly where they should be placed. As we came out, before riding back to bring up the guns, we dismounted in a place of comparative security, just to stretch our limbs and unbend a moment from t
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville Our mother and sisters arrive from the North a horse's instinct of locality and direction our artillery battalion and its commander Commerce across the Rappahannock snow-ball battles a commission in engineer troops an appointment on Jackson's staff characteristic interview between General Jackson and my father the Army telegraph President Lincoln's letter Hooker's plan really great, but Lee's audacity and his Army equal to any crisis head of column, to the left or to the right. In the four or five months between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, that is to say, between the middle of December, 1862, and the first of May, 1863, several things occurred of special interest to me personally, as well as several others of more general and public significance. It is not possible now to relate these events in their exact sequence, nor even to be confident that every incident referred to as belonging to this p
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