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, and awaiting developments. On the contrary, he proceeded to maneuver his adversary out of a position from which he could not drive him, and to force him to abandon all idea of further aggressive campaign in Virginia for that year. Early in June, with his army reorganized into three corps, the First under Longstreet, embracing the divisions of Mc-Laws, Picket, and Hood; the Second under Ewell, embracing Early, Rodes, and Jackson; and the Third under A. P. Hill, Anderson, Heth, and Pender,of ordnance, commissary, and quartermaster's stores. The remnant of Milroy's forces took refuge behind the fortifications of Harper's Ferry; but as the reduction of that place had proved a very disturbing element in General Lee's plans for the Maryland campaign of the preceding year, we gave it the go-by this time; Lieutenant-General Ewell with his three divisions, still in the van, crossing the Potomac in the latter part of June, rapidly traversing Maryland and advancing into Pennsylvania.
r Longstreet, embracing the divisions of Mc-Laws, Picket, and Hood; the Second under Ewell, embracing Early, Rodes, and Jackson; and the Third under A. P. Hill, Anderson, Heth, and Pender,--all the corps commanders being lieutenant-generals,--Lee drew away from the line of the Rappahannock, leaving Hill, however, for a short time, to watch Hooker, proceeded northward, by way of Culpeper and the Valley of Virginia,--the Second Corps in advance,--crossed the Shenandoah near Front Royal about June 12th, and, near Winchester, routed and captured a large part of the force which, under Milroy, was holding the Lower Valley. Hill followed Ewell, Longstreet's corps hovering yet a while east of the mountains, to cover their operations. It was about this time that President Lincoln and General Hooker had their famous serpentine telegraphic correspondence: Where is the Rebel army? The advance is at the fords of the Potomac and the rear at Culpeper Court House. If the head of th
Federal invasion. General Lee was a soldier who thoroughly appreciated the value of an offensive defensive. He never allowed his adversary quietly to mature and uninterruptedly to adhere to and carry out his own plan of campaign. Although conducting a defensive struggle, he was yet generally the attacking party. It was so in the Seven Days battles with Mc-Clellan, so in the Manassas campaign with Pope and the Maryland campaign that followed. It was so at Chancellorsville. And even in 1864, after the resources and fighting strength of the Confederacy had been so fearfully reduced, when Grant entered the Wilderness, Lee immediately pressed in after him and closed with him in a death grapple in the very heart of the jungle. But perhaps the most perfect instance and illustration of this characteristic feature of Lee's strategy and tactics, and of the real significance of his two invasions of Northern territory, is what occurred after Chancellorsville. When Hooker retired acro
Richard Heron Anderson (search for this): chapter 14
he initiative to Hooker, and awaiting developments. On the contrary, he proceeded to maneuver his adversary out of a position from which he could not drive him, and to force him to abandon all idea of further aggressive campaign in Virginia for that year. Early in June, with his army reorganized into three corps, the First under Longstreet, embracing the divisions of Mc-Laws, Picket, and Hood; the Second under Ewell, embracing Early, Rodes, and Jackson; and the Third under A. P. Hill, Anderson, Heth, and Pender,--all the corps commanders being lieutenant-generals,--Lee drew away from the line of the Rappahannock, leaving Hill, however, for a short time, to watch Hooker, proceeded northward, by way of Culpeper and the Valley of Virginia,--the Second Corps in advance,--crossed the Shenandoah near Front Royal about June 12th, and, near Winchester, routed and captured a large part of the force which, under Milroy, was holding the Lower Valley. Hill followed Ewell, Longstreet's corps
James H. Beers (search for this): chapter 14
ahannock to the Potomac The engineer troops Jubal Early his ability and devotion his caustic tongue Lee a master of the offensive defensive his Army organized into three corps he turns Northward and maneuvers Hooker out of his position on the Rappahannock the battle of Winchester fine work large captures scenes and incidents of the battle. It is singular that I cannot recall with distinctness anything that occurred during this visit to Richmond, save the burial of poor Beers; and as to that I remember only what I have related. I do not recall much enthusiasm or elation of spirit about my promotion; indeed I felt little, for it severed the strong ties that bound me to my old comrades; it removed me from a branch of the service which I loved and in which I felt competent to do efficient work, and transferred me to another for. which I possessed neither taste nor training. My orders were to report to Major-General Early, in the field, and in connection with th
Henry Coalter Cabell (search for this): chapter 14
ing around with some battery. When my brother told me this, as he did when we next met, I was at once irritated and amused. It was after I had, with General Early's approval, gone back to the old battalion to serve as its adjutant, under Colonel Cabell. I did not happen to meet the general for some time, and meanwhile fortune had smiled upon me in many ways. I was located to my entire satisfaction, had a fine horse, was better dressed and equipped every way, and was feeling generally satiore, a bone of contention between the engineer troops and the artillery. Colonel Talcott would every now and then report my absence from duty and ask that I be ordered back to my post with his regiment, and this application being referred to Colonel Cabell, he would answer that it would be highly detrimental to the service to remove me, just at this time, from my position as acting adjutant of his battalion. As these papers had to pass through army headquarters, and in some instances even to
Jubal Early (search for this): chapter 14
o the Potomac The engineer troops Jubal Early his ability and devotion his caustic tongrom his division. I do not remember where General Early was, but somewhere in the northern or centd decidedly expressed — to the effect that General Early had no idea of losing a musket from his dio assume. I therefore went directly to General Early and had a full talk with him. I did most oment seemed to be entirely satisfactory to General Early, as it was also to Colonel Jones, in one oment seemed to be entirely satisfactory to General Early, and yet in connection with it there occurends of the old battery, while he came over to Early's division of the Second to inquire for me. Hire Morton was in the Secession Convention with Early, as extreme a Secessionist as Early was Unioni to mount a horse and fly. It so happened that Early commanded the vanguard of the Confederate forcte, digging his spurs into his horse's flanks, Early playfully threw a line of troops across the ro[10 more...]
Jubal A. Early (search for this): chapter 14
coming to camp, substantially the following note: headquarters 2d corps, A. No.--Va. To Gen. Jubal A. Early, Commanding Division: General-Gen. Jackson's compliments to Gen. Early, and he would lGen. Early, and he would like to be informed why he saw so many stragglers in rear of your division to-day. Respectfully, A. G. Pendleton, A. A. G. 2d Corps. To which Old Jube promptly dictated and sent the following reply: headquarters Early's division, A. no.--Va. To Col. A. G. Pendleton, A. A. G. 2d Corps: Colonel-General Early's compliments to General Jackson, and he takes pleasure in informing him that heColonel-General Early's compliments to General Jackson, and he takes pleasure in informing him that he saw so many stragglers in rear of my division to-day, probably because he rode in rear of my division. Respectfully, Jubal A. Early, Commanding Division. There was not another officer in thempertinence in sending it would have been met with a laugh. After the war, its memories were Early's religion; his mission, to vindicate the truth of history with regard to it. So long as the old
. Early in June, with his army reorganized into three corps, the First under Longstreet, embracing the divisions of Mc-Laws, Picket, and Hood; the Second under Ewell, embracing Early, Rodes, and Jackson; and the Third under A. P. Hill, Anderson, Heth, and Pender,--all the corps commanders being lieutenant-generals,--Lee drew aw Front Royal about June 12th, and, near Winchester, routed and captured a large part of the force which, under Milroy, was holding the Lower Valley. Hill followed Ewell, Longstreet's corps hovering yet a while east of the mountains, to cover their operations. It was about this time that President Lincoln and General Hooker hadf that place had proved a very disturbing element in General Lee's plans for the Maryland campaign of the preceding year, we gave it the go-by this time; Lieutenant-General Ewell with his three divisions, still in the van, crossing the Potomac in the latter part of June, rapidly traversing Maryland and advancing into Pennsylvania.
Edward Flood (search for this): chapter 14
a rough but very efficient man, who, among his many admirable qualifications, possessed this highly acceptable one, that he had no sort of objection to Old Jube's airing his choice vocabulary of profane rhetoric about him, or his work, or his men whenever he might happen to need relief in that direction. I said further to the general that I thought the pioneer corps might perhaps be regarded as the nucleus of the future company of engineer troops, and while I had no idea of meddling with Flood's work, which he was vastly better qualified to manage than I was, yet I could help him about his requisitions, reports, etc.; but that as we were evidently going into an active and aggressive campaign I thought I would, in action, fight in some battery of Col. Hilary Jones' Battalion, if he thought he could make use of me-standing ready, however, at all times to report back to Division Headquarters for staff duty or for anything I could at any time do for the general. This arrangement s
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