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William Tatum Wofford (search for this): chapter 20
t of Kershaw; and Clingman's, the left brigade of Hoke and Wofford's, the right brigade of Kershaw gave way, and the Federal lost, and our lines were left in very bad shape. While Wofford was bending back the right of his line to connect with Hoks were shot; but it was already considerably in advance of Wofford's left, with which it was not connected at all, until the s taken in reaching the gun — that is, we went down behind Wofford's left flank, and from that point ran across a field coverThis route afforded the best protection, but after we left Wofford's position the protection amounted to nothing. The sharpsr the little bridge, and were just passing out from behind Wofford's left flank and heading for Kershaw's line, when someone ome conviction and I felt sure I was talking with General Wofford. He positively forbade the attempt, and did not seem disper us almost noiselessly, along the sassafras field toward Wofford's line. In a few moments we reached the goal, returning o
Charles Scott Venable (search for this): chapter 20
logs faced with earth. Thus he had a place where he and his officers could safely confer and at a very short distance from their commands; but it was after all a ghastly place, and very difficult and dangerous of approach. All the roads or paths leading to it were not only swept by an almost continuous and heavy fire of musketry, but I had to keep a force of axe-men almost constantly at work cutting away trees felled across the ammunition roads by the artillery fire of the enemy. Col. Charles S. Venable, reputed to be one of the roughest and most daring riders on General Lee's staff,later, professor of mathematics at the University of Virginia, and chairman of the faculty,--told me he believed this headquarter position of Kershaw's at Cold Harbor was the worst place he was ever sent to. Colonel Cabell was necessarily a great part of the time at these headquarters, and I also, when not engaged at some special work, or with some of the guns, or on the way from one to another. At Col
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
bending back the right of his line to connect with Hoke, who, even with the aid sent him, had not quite succeeded in regaining his original position, Kershaw's old brigade, which had more perfectly recovered from its little contretemps, was pressing and driving the enemy, both advancing and extending its line upon higher and better ground, a feat it would never have been able to accomplish but for the aid of one of Calloway's guns, which, under command of Lieutenant Robert Falligant, of Savannah, Ga., held and carried the right flank of the brigade, coming into battery and fighting fiercely whenever the enemy seemed to be holding the brigade in check, and limbering up and moving forward with it, while it was advancing; and this alternate advancing and firing was kept up until a fresh Federal force came in and opened fire on the right flank, and all of Falligant's horses fell at the first volley. The enemy made a gallant rush for the piece, but they did not get it. It was in battery
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
pter 20: from Spottsylvania to Cold Harbor Another Slide to the east, and another, and another the armies straining like two Coursers, side by side, for the next goal Grant waiting for reinforcements Lee seriously Indisposed one of his three corps commanders disabled by wounds, another by sickness Mickey and the children it Beats a furlough Hollow a baby in battle death of Lawrence M. Keitt and demoralization of his command splendid services of Lieut. Robt. Falligant, of Georgia, with a single gun hot fighting the evening of June 1st building roads and bridges and getting ready June 2d removal of Falligant's lone gun at night. After feeling our lines, feinting several times, and making, on the 18th, what might perhaps be termed a genuine attack, Grant, on the evening of the 20th, slid off toward Bowling Green; but although he got a little the start of Lee, yet, when he reached his immediate objective, Lee was in line of battle at Hanover Junction, directly ac
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
s says in express terms, The 2d of June was spent in getting troops into position for attack on the 3d; and the Official journal of our corps says, under date of June 3d, The expected battle begins early. This journal also notes the weakness of Kershaw's Salient, and that the enemy was aware of it, and was massing heavily in front of it. Three brigades were sent to support Kershaw-Anderson's, Gregg's, and Law's. We also set to work to rectify the lines about this point. Gen. E. M. Law, of Alabama, is probably entitled to the credit of this suggestion, which had so important a bearing upon our success. He laid off the new line with his own hand and superintended the construction of it during the night of the 2d. The record of the 3d might have been a very different one if this change had not been made. Under Colonel Cabell's instructions and with the aid of the division pioneer corps, I opened roads through the woods for the more rapid and convenient transmission of artillery ammu
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Chapter 20: from Spottsylvania to Cold Harbor Another Slide to the east, and another, and another the armies straining like two Coursers, side by side, for the next goal Grant waiting for reinforcements Lee seriously Indisposed one of his three corps commanders disabled by wounds, another by sickness Mickey and the hollow! We almost began to hope that Grant had gotten enough. Even his apparent, yes, real, success at the Salient did not embolden him to attack again at Spottsylvania. He had retired without any serious fighting at Hanover Junction or North Anna, and after feeling our position about Atlee's, he had once more slipped away frs would have retired and given it up long ago. Was he about to do so? The fact is, Grant was waiting for reinforcements. He had been heavily reinforced at Spottsylvania after the 12th of May, but not up to the measure of his desires, or of his needs, either; for he really needed more men-and more, and more. He needed them, he
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
e, and they had waited, and it had become evident she would sing no more-and then a deep sigh from both the spell-bound auditors, and one of them, making use of the strongest figure he could command, exclaimed, from the bottom of a full heart, Well, it beats a furlough hollow! We almost began to hope that Grant had gotten enough. Even his apparent, yes, real, success at the Salient did not embolden him to attack again at Spottsylvania. He had retired without any serious fighting at Hanover Junction or North Anna, and after feeling our position about Atlee's, he had once more slipped away from our front. Where was he going? What did he intend to do? Anyone of his predecessors would have retired and given it up long ago. Was he about to do so? The fact is, Grant was waiting for reinforcements. He had been heavily reinforced at Spottsylvania after the 12th of May, but not up to the measure of his desires, or of his needs, either; for he really needed more men-and more, and mo
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
t Beats a furlough Hollow a baby in battle death of Lawrence M. Keitt and demoralization of his command splendid services of Lieut. Robt. Falligant, of Georgia, with a single gun hot fighting the evening of June 1st building roads and bridges and getting ready June 2d removal of Falligant's lone gun at night. After feeling our lines, feinting several times, and making, on the 18th, what might perhaps be termed a genuine attack, Grant, on the evening of the 20th, slid off toward Bowling Green; but although he got a little the start of Lee, yet, when he reached his immediate objective, Lee was in line of battle at Hanover Junction, directly across the line of further progress. It is the belief of many intelligent Confederate officers that if Lee had not been attacked by disabling disease, the movements of the two armies about the North Anna would have had a very different termination. Grant ran great risk in taking his army to the southern bank of the river with Lee on the s
North Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
aited, and it had become evident she would sing no more-and then a deep sigh from both the spell-bound auditors, and one of them, making use of the strongest figure he could command, exclaimed, from the bottom of a full heart, Well, it beats a furlough hollow! We almost began to hope that Grant had gotten enough. Even his apparent, yes, real, success at the Salient did not embolden him to attack again at Spottsylvania. He had retired without any serious fighting at Hanover Junction or North Anna, and after feeling our position about Atlee's, he had once more slipped away from our front. Where was he going? What did he intend to do? Anyone of his predecessors would have retired and given it up long ago. Was he about to do so? The fact is, Grant was waiting for reinforcements. He had been heavily reinforced at Spottsylvania after the 12th of May, but not up to the measure of his desires, or of his needs, either; for he really needed more men-and more, and more. He needed th
Walter Herron Taylor (search for this): chapter 20
e, seeing the respective commanding officers in person. On the first round I did not find General Lee at his quarters, and was told that he had ridden down the road to the lines. When I reached the lines I heard he had passed out in front. Following him up, I found him in the rain with a single piece of horse artillery, feeling the enemy. My second ride was made largely at night, and, as I remember, every officer I desired to see was asleep, except at Army Headquarters, where I found Colonel Taylor in his tent on his knees, with his prayer-book open before him, and General Lee in his tent, wide-awake, poring over a map stretched upon a temporary table of rough plank, with a tallow candle stuck in a bottle for a light. I remember saying to myself, as I delivered my message and withdrew, Does he never, never sleep? Again General Grant slid to the east, and we moved off upon a parallel line. I think it was during this detour-or it may have been an earlier or a later one--that I w
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