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Robert Lee (search for this): chapter 26
ve and reverence for his profession. It is all clear to me now. I am not a blind enthusiast. I admit that the almost enforced idleness of the camp in time of peace, the absence of women and children and the lack of other refining and elevating influence of home, are blemishes in the life of the soldier. Nevertheless, I think we may, in the light of our analysis, begin to comprehend why great soldiers-Sir Philip Sidney, Henry Havelock, Hedley Vicars, Chinese Gordon, Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lee — have exhibited an almost unrivaled elevation, strength, and perfection of character, both as men and as Christians. The late Dr. T. De Witt Talmage never penned a truer or a stronger paragraph than the following: The sword has developed the grandest natures that the world ever saw. It has developed courage — that sublime energy of the soul which defies the universe when it feels itself to be in the right. It has developed a self-sacrifice which repudiates the idea that our life
Chinese Gordon (search for this): chapter 26
my father's almost passionate love and reverence for his profession. It is all clear to me now. I am not a blind enthusiast. I admit that the almost enforced idleness of the camp in time of peace, the absence of women and children and the lack of other refining and elevating influence of home, are blemishes in the life of the soldier. Nevertheless, I think we may, in the light of our analysis, begin to comprehend why great soldiers-Sir Philip Sidney, Henry Havelock, Hedley Vicars, Chinese Gordon, Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lee — have exhibited an almost unrivaled elevation, strength, and perfection of character, both as men and as Christians. The late Dr. T. De Witt Talmage never penned a truer or a stronger paragraph than the following: The sword has developed the grandest natures that the world ever saw. It has developed courage — that sublime energy of the soul which defies the universe when it feels itself to be in the right. It has developed a self-sacrifice which r
Philip Sidney (search for this): chapter 26
om, nor sympathized, as I should have done, with my father's almost passionate love and reverence for his profession. It is all clear to me now. I am not a blind enthusiast. I admit that the almost enforced idleness of the camp in time of peace, the absence of women and children and the lack of other refining and elevating influence of home, are blemishes in the life of the soldier. Nevertheless, I think we may, in the light of our analysis, begin to comprehend why great soldiers-Sir Philip Sidney, Henry Havelock, Hedley Vicars, Chinese Gordon, Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lee — have exhibited an almost unrivaled elevation, strength, and perfection of character, both as men and as Christians. The late Dr. T. De Witt Talmage never penned a truer or a stronger paragraph than the following: The sword has developed the grandest natures that the world ever saw. It has developed courage — that sublime energy of the soul which defies the universe when it feels itself to be in the
Hedley Vicars (search for this): chapter 26
have done, with my father's almost passionate love and reverence for his profession. It is all clear to me now. I am not a blind enthusiast. I admit that the almost enforced idleness of the camp in time of peace, the absence of women and children and the lack of other refining and elevating influence of home, are blemishes in the life of the soldier. Nevertheless, I think we may, in the light of our analysis, begin to comprehend why great soldiers-Sir Philip Sidney, Henry Havelock, Hedley Vicars, Chinese Gordon, Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lee — have exhibited an almost unrivaled elevation, strength, and perfection of character, both as men and as Christians. The late Dr. T. De Witt Talmage never penned a truer or a stronger paragraph than the following: The sword has developed the grandest natures that the world ever saw. It has developed courage — that sublime energy of the soul which defies the universe when it feels itself to be in the right. It has developed a self-s
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 26
hority. The soldier, however, has very little sympathy with the right of revolution, or any modification of or exception to the law of unquestioning obedience. His theory and practice in this regard find apt illustration in the reply of General Jackson to the brigade commander, who gave excellent reasons for having modified the order of march: Sir, you should have obeyed the order first and reasoned about it afterwards. Consider yourself under arrest. The last lesson of the soldier-lifand elevating influence of home, are blemishes in the life of the soldier. Nevertheless, I think we may, in the light of our analysis, begin to comprehend why great soldiers-Sir Philip Sidney, Henry Havelock, Hedley Vicars, Chinese Gordon, Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lee — have exhibited an almost unrivaled elevation, strength, and perfection of character, both as men and as Christians. The late Dr. T. De Witt Talmage never penned a truer or a stronger paragraph than the following: The s
Custis Lee (search for this): chapter 26
for duty ; absent from duty ; shot to death for absence from duty --how many times, during the four years from 1861 to 1865, do you suppose I read, wrote, uttered, heard these and kindred expressions? Is it not clear that, by his everyday's experience and intercourse, this one great figure-his life a service, its employment duty --is burned in upon the soldier's soul? In the light of these principles, and of his lifelong training, we gain a new conception of that sublime sentence in General Lee's letter to his son, Duty is the sublimest word in the English language; and of that groan of his mighty soul in the crisis and agony of defeat, It is my duty to live. The first lesson of the soldier-life is unquestioning Obedience. No one will deny the justness of the analysis here. Undeniably, the first lesson of the soldier's life, logically and chronologically, is obedience. There is no department, no business, no station, in which instant, implicit, blindfold obedience is so
Henry Havelock (search for this): chapter 26
ed, as I should have done, with my father's almost passionate love and reverence for his profession. It is all clear to me now. I am not a blind enthusiast. I admit that the almost enforced idleness of the camp in time of peace, the absence of women and children and the lack of other refining and elevating influence of home, are blemishes in the life of the soldier. Nevertheless, I think we may, in the light of our analysis, begin to comprehend why great soldiers-Sir Philip Sidney, Henry Havelock, Hedley Vicars, Chinese Gordon, Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lee — have exhibited an almost unrivaled elevation, strength, and perfection of character, both as men and as Christians. The late Dr. T. De Witt Talmage never penned a truer or a stronger paragraph than the following: The sword has developed the grandest natures that the world ever saw. It has developed courage — that sublime energy of the soul which defies the universe when it feels itself to be in the right. It has dev
T. De Witt Talmage (search for this): chapter 26
e camp in time of peace, the absence of women and children and the lack of other refining and elevating influence of home, are blemishes in the life of the soldier. Nevertheless, I think we may, in the light of our analysis, begin to comprehend why great soldiers-Sir Philip Sidney, Henry Havelock, Hedley Vicars, Chinese Gordon, Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lee — have exhibited an almost unrivaled elevation, strength, and perfection of character, both as men and as Christians. The late Dr. T. De Witt Talmage never penned a truer or a stronger paragraph than the following: The sword has developed the grandest natures that the world ever saw. It has developed courage — that sublime energy of the soul which defies the universe when it feels itself to be in the right. It has developed a self-sacrifice which repudiates the idea that our life is worth more than anything else, when for a principle it throws that life away, as much as to say, It is not necessary that I live, but it is ne
the fault is in the telling. And yet I cannot but hope — that, in spite of feeble and inadequate portrayal, the great outlines of the picture have so impressed themselves upon you that you are ready to admit the life of Marse Robert's boys, from 1861 to 1865, to have been a higher and greater life than you had imagined. It would seem as if this must be so, if you have credited the writer with a fair average of intelligence and conscientiousness. I can well understand, however, that, witho ; entered the service ; discharged from the service; promoted for gallant and meritorious service ; duty ; on duty ; off duty ; present for duty ; absent from duty ; shot to death for absence from duty --how many times, during the four years from 1861 to 1865, do you suppose I read, wrote, uttered, heard these and kindred expressions? Is it not clear that, by his everyday's experience and intercourse, this one great figure-his life a service, its employment duty --is burned in upon the soldie
lt is in the telling. And yet I cannot but hope — that, in spite of feeble and inadequate portrayal, the great outlines of the picture have so impressed themselves upon you that you are ready to admit the life of Marse Robert's boys, from 1861 to 1865, to have been a higher and greater life than you had imagined. It would seem as if this must be so, if you have credited the writer with a fair average of intelligence and conscientiousness. I can well understand, however, that, without refleed the service ; discharged from the service; promoted for gallant and meritorious service ; duty ; on duty ; off duty ; present for duty ; absent from duty ; shot to death for absence from duty --how many times, during the four years from 1861 to 1865, do you suppose I read, wrote, uttered, heard these and kindred expressions? Is it not clear that, by his everyday's experience and intercourse, this one great figure-his life a service, its employment duty --is burned in upon the soldier's soul