hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 147 1 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 136 0 Browse Search
Ulysses Simpson Grant 118 0 Browse Search
Jubal Early 118 0 Browse Search
Custis Lee 111 7 Browse Search
Robert Lee 100 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 83 5 Browse Search
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) 80 0 Browse Search
George Brinton McClellan 80 0 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert. Search the whole document.

Found 208 total hits in 61 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
er of men from the neighboring commands gathered, and just as we knelt and my father began his petitions the batteries across the way sent two or three shells entirely too close to our heads to be comfortable — I presume just by way of determining the object of this concourse. I confess my faith and devotion were not strong enough to prevent my opening my eyes and glancing around. The scene that met them was almost too much for my reverence and came near being fatal to my decorum. Our Carolina supports, like the rest of us, had knelt and closed their eyes at my father's invocation and, simple-hearted fellows that they were, felt that it would be little less than sacrilege to rise or to open them until the prayer should be completed; and yet their faith was not quite equal to assuring them of God's protection, or at least they felt it would be wise and well to supplement the protection of heaven by the trees and stumps of earth, if they could find them, and so they were actually g
Westover (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
army to Lee, notwithstanding his successful defense at Malvern Hill. The matter will be found circumstantially set out in Colonel Taylor's book, pages 41-44, substantiated and confirmed by a full extract from General Stuart's manuscript of Reports and notes on the war, and also by extracts from the report of the Committee on the Conduct of the war, and is in outline as follows: Stuart, Lee's chief of cavalry, following up McClellan's movements after Malvern Hill, from the heights above Westover, overlooked the entire Federal army huddled together in the river bottoms of and adjacent to Westover plantation, apparently in a state of utter disorganization and unpreparedness, and he could not resist the temptation of dropping a few shells among them, which produced a perfect stampede among the troops and wagons, but at the same time had the effect of calling the attention of the Federal commanders to the fact that the position of their army was utterly untenable without command of the
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ery, devotedly loved and admired by his commanding general, the pride of the cavalry corps, one of the most dashing and brilliant soldiers in the service, though but twenty-two years of age when he fell. He was knighted by Lee himself in official report as the gallant Pelham. The other, Pegram, was a more serious and a more powerful man, who came of a family of soldiers who had rendered distinguished service, both in the army and navy, prior to the war; an elder brother, a graduate of West Point and a singularly attractive man, rising to the rank of major-general in the Confederate service, and also losing his life in battle. The younger brother, the artillerist, a student when the war began, enlisted as a private soldier in a battery raised in the City of Richmond, which he commanded when the Seven Days battles opened, rendering with it signal and distinguished service. Eventually he rose to the rank and command of colonel of artillery, and was recommended for appointment as br
Iuka (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
olitary march in the morning. That was Malvern Hill day, and when the regiment, on its first charge, stopped ascending that fearful slope of death and turned back, Jud. Smith did not stop. He went right on, never returned and was never seen or heard of again. The family was one of wealth and position in Mississippi, the father an old man, and having only these two boys. When he heard of the loss of both almost in one day he left home, joined Price's army as a private soldier, and at Iuka did just as his eldest son had done at Malvern Hill, which was the last ever seen or heard of him, and the family became extinct. Walking over the field of Malvern Hill the morning after the battle, I saw two young Federal soldiers lying dead, side by side, their heads upon the same knapsack and their arms about each other. They were evidently brothers and enough alike to be twins. The whole pathetic story was plainly evident. One had first been wounded, perhaps killed, and when the ot
John Pegram (search for this): chapter 9
a Confederate victory the Federal artillery fire demoralization of Lee's Army McClellan will be gone by daylight the weight of Lee's sword Stuart Pelham Pegram Extra Billy to battle in a trotting sulky the standard of courage. I have said nothing as yet about Malvern Hill. No Confederate cares to say anything abTom Carter, who never lost the place he made for himself at Seven Pines in the affectionate admiration of the artillery and of the army, were the boy artillerists Pegram and Pelham, both yielding their glorious young lives in the struggle-Pegram at the very end, Pelham but eight months after Malvern Hill. The latter, an Alabamian soldiers in the service, though but twenty-two years of age when he fell. He was knighted by Lee himself in official report as the gallant Pelham. The other, Pegram, was a more serious and a more powerful man, who came of a family of soldiers who had rendered distinguished service, both in the army and navy, prior to the war
Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 9
rations of his friends, and resumed his solitary march in the morning. That was Malvern Hill day, and when the regiment, on its first charge, stopped ascending that fearful slope of death and turned back, Jud. Smith did not stop. He went right on, never returned and was never seen or heard of again. The family was one of wealth and position in Mississippi, the father an old man, and having only these two boys. When he heard of the loss of both almost in one day he left home, joined Price's army as a private soldier, and at Iuka did just as his eldest son had done at Malvern Hill, which was the last ever seen or heard of him, and the family became extinct. Walking over the field of Malvern Hill the morning after the battle, I saw two young Federal soldiers lying dead, side by side, their heads upon the same knapsack and their arms about each other. They were evidently brothers and enough alike to be twins. The whole pathetic story was plainly evident. One had first bee
Virginians (search for this): chapter 9
f the most prominent generals say that it was their belief my father had seen more of the fighting of the Seven Days, from start to finish, than any other one man in or out of the army. I was of course deeply anxious about him, but he could not be controlled, and my belief was then, and is now, that the Federal skirmishers often refrained from firing upon him simply because they did not care at the time to expose their position. Many of our soldiers knew him, especially the Georgians, Virginians and Mississippians. Georgia was his native State. In his early days he had done a great deal of evangelistic work in all parts of it, and many young men and boys in the army had heard their parents speak of him. I remember one evening, after a most impressive sermon to Cobb's or Cummings' brigade, overhearing a lot of soldiers talking at a spring, when one of them, anxious to appear a little more familiarly acquainted with the preacher than the rest, said, I've heard my mother talk of th
Carey Smith (search for this): chapter 9
avy rain. When I recalled the scene and the heroic conduct of General , I remember saying to myself, What is the true standard of courage? There were a number of Yale men in the Twenty-first Mississippi, among others two brothers, Jud. and Carey Smith. We used to call Jud. Indian Smith at Yale. I think it was at Savage Station, when the Seventeenth and Twenty-first Mississippi were put into the woods at nightfall and directed to lie down, that Carey Smith, the younger brother, putting hisCarey Smith, the younger brother, putting his hand in his bosom, found it covered with blood, when he withdrew it, and saying: What does this mean? instantly died. He had been mortally wounded without knowing when. Judson Smith went almost deranged; yes, I think altogether deranged. He bore his dead brother out of the woods. His company and regimental officers proposed to send the body to Richmond in an ambulance and urged Judson to go with it. He refused both propositions. He kept the body folded to his bosom, and all through th
Walter Herron Taylor (search for this): chapter 9
interview described in the preceding chapter, was never drawn. The understanding in the army at the time was that Huger and Holmes were to have drawn it, but that their commands lost their way in the almost trackless forest. In an address on The campaigns of Gen. Robert E. Lee, delivered at Washington and Lee University in 1872, on January 19th, Lee's birthday, Gen. Jubal A. Early says: Holmes' command, over six thousand strong, did not actually engage in any of the battles. But Col. Walter H. Taylor, in his Four years with General Lee, published in 1877, already referred to, repeats three times — on pages 51, 53, and 54-that Holmes' command numbered ten thousand or more; and it is obvious, upon a comparison of the two statements, that Early's figures, over six thousand, did not include Ransom's brigade, which numbered thirty-six hundred. It seems incredible, yet it appears to be true, that General Holmes was very deaf; so deaf that, when heaven and earth were shuddering with
Robert Lee (search for this): chapter 9
oved and trusted next after his great chief, Robert Lee. I quote from an address first delivered by ed Mc-Clellan's surrendering his entire army to Lee, notwithstanding his successful defense at Malv war, and is in outline as follows: Stuart, Lee's chief of cavalry, following up McClellan's moossession of them. Stuart at once informed General Lee and received word that Jackson and Longstrey from Evelington Heights, before informing General Lee of the situation, was apparently the cause anded the world's verdict. When we contemplate Lee's great plan and the qualities of leadership whxplanation, that the prominent impression which Lee invariably seems to make is that of roundness, ed positions. Mayhap old Jubal Early, who knew Lee and knew war as well as any other man on eitherich he had had no previous personal connection, Lee had completely secured its confidence and correpointment as brigadier-general of infantry, General Lee saying he would find a brigade for him just[3 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7